Daily Stuff 7-23-17 Loch Ness Monster

Hi, folks!

Minus Tide at 7:20 AM of -2.1 feet. House Capuchin Project Day noon to 6pm.

It’s windy today! 10mph in town with the gusts hitting 17 and down on the beaches it’s over 20 in places. The evergreens were making the rushing water sound. as I walked up from the apartment. I love that pathway. There are different scents with every step. It’s 63F with 73% humidity.

Tempus had to run back to the yard sale, since we didn’t get the knobs and washers for the rock tumbler drums. I sat at my desk and wheezed. They didn’t know where they were, but at least they know they’re missing.

We were busy in the early part of the day. Lots of customers through and saw Arrhiannon and her husband. 40th anniversary trip!

Trying to make more pincushion filling we discovered that the herb grinder we’ve been using wasn’t just stuck, it was blown out, so Tempus went out to the flea market to see what he could find and then spent a long time using the one he brought back. I was mostly doing paperwork between customers and stuffing/headering herbs, slowly.

We eventually had a whole bottle of pincushion filling, then had supper, then headed home.

Tempus has been busy loading our landlady’s car and watering. He let me sleep. 🙂 I have more “stuffing” to do today and some ironing, if he gets the pincushions stuff put away and then the House Capuchin people should be by this afternoon.

10463885_10152677779917228_3842373100698473051_n

Hoaxed_photo_of_the_Loch_Ness_monsterToday’s Feast is in honor of the Loch Ness Monster. Yesterday was the anniversary of the date in 1933 when interest was roused in the larger public, although stories about it seem to exist back to the 6th century, or were those attached to Nessie later? There are photos and films, sonar investigations and all kinds of evidence of something, but what is it? The monster is a cryptid, a critter that no one is sure exists! Some people believe it is a real creature. Some folks will tell you it’s all a hoax. <shrug> If I see it, I’ll tell you! There’s a lovely long article here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loch_Ness_Monster

Today’s plant is Ocean SprayHolodiscus discolor – Allows old grief and sorrow to surface and be released. Will support living in the here and now. Helpful for deep skin issues, like eczema, or respiratory problems and other healing uses. Medicinally has been used as a tonic and for various topical applications for skin healing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodiscus_discolor

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am.  Dark of the Moon, End of the cycle In the time leading up to the “New Moon” you may do banishings and other baneful magicks and healings that require blasting a disease away, as well as using the time for introspection and self-work. Do scrying, now. Good for reversing circumstances. God/dess Aspect: The One Beyond, the Watchers in the Outer Dark, psychopomps – Associated God/desses: Hecate, Kali, Arianhrod, Anja, Kore in the Underworld, Ereshkigal who was Inanna, Set/Seth, Hades, Osiris. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am. New Moon – The beginning of a new cycle. Keywords for the New phase are: beginning, birth, emergence, projection, clarity. It is the time in a cycle that you are stimulated to take a new action. During this phase the new cycle is being seeded by your vision, inner and outer. Engage in physical activity. Spend time alone. VISUALIZE your goals for the 29.6-day cycle ahead. The new moon is for starting new ventures, new beginnings. Also love and romance, health or job hunting. God/dess aspect: Infancy, the Cosmic Egg, Eyes-Wide-Open – Associated God/dess: Inanna who was Ereshkigal. Phase ends at 2:46pm on 7/24. Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 8/7 at 11:11am. 

In bright twilight, look low and use the Moon to find your way to Mercury and Regulus. Mercury moves fast with respect to the background stars; the pair is drawn here for the 24th. On the 25th, Mercury will be closer to Regulus’s lower left.
The tail of Scorpius curves low to the lower left of the Scorpion’s bright head and main body. How low depends on how far north or south you live: the farther south, the higher. Look for the two stars especially close together in the tail. These are Lambda and fainter Upsilon Scorpii, known as the Cat’s Eyes. They’re canted at an angle; the cat is tilting his head and winking. The Cat’s Eyes point west (right) by nearly a fist-width toward Mu Scorpii, a much tighter pair known as the Little Cat’s Eyes. Can you resolve Mu without using binoculars? It takes very sharp vision!

New Moon (exact at 2:46 a.m. July 23rd PDT).
Mercury (magnitude 0) is low above the west-northwest horizon 30 or 40 minutes after sunset. Catch it while you can.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Leo
Moon in Cancer enters Leo at 1:34am.
New Moon exact 2:46am
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Amber

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
Su  23     High  12:20 AM     8.8   5:54 AM    Rise  6:17 AM      0
~    23      Low   7:20 AM    -2.1   8:51 PM     Set  9:09 PM
~    23     High   1:48 PM     7.0
~    23      Low   7:18 PM     1.7

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Don’t push the river, just let it flow.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What would you? – What would you do if you had all the money in the world?

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Quotes  

~  The real measure of your wealth is how much you’d be worth if you lost all your money. – Bernard Meltzer (1914-) American Law Professor
~  The road to a better tomorrow starts at the intersection of fear and faith. Take a deep breath and put the courage pedal to the metal! – David Roppo
~  The wise man does not show, he shines. He does not impose, he is noticed. He does not pretend, people see the result of his actions. He does not force himself, he progresses. – Lao Tzu
~  There is a big difference between a religion of belief and a spirituality based on understanding. – J.M.Greer

Knelt before power absolute, I close my eyes to see a path invisible to my sight. With light to guide me, my path will be of truth… courage… and love. My prayer is to no one, and to everything. Let fate lead me, always. My son, let these words lead you to a greater life. – Chronicles of the Jedi: Frostborn, forthcoming, Raun Beorson

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Lughnasadh Magick – The Rye-Wolf: Faerieworlds 2013 Opening Ceremony Poetry

August 1, 2013 at 10:21am

The rye-wolf is walking amongst the grass,
the blade of autumn rising.
Days of spring have come to pass,
the reapers greet the ripening.
Whence fields grow heavy in the ear,
and pale turn sheaves of ripened rye.
The seeds in springtimes furrows cast,
crown first harvest hour sky.

Hear we offer
summer’s first fruit,
upon the altar
of a meadow bright.
Hear we share
summer’s first grain,
within the temple
of ancient light.

Oh gather thy sheaves,
raise thy sickle to the grains,
hear the season call your name.
A golden wreath,
the crown of summer’s day,
hear the season call your name.
Tears of joy,
tears of sorrow,
hear the call, come home again.
A golden wreath,
the crown of summer’s day,
hear the season call your name.

The wheat-wolf is rushing over the field,
windy steps mark summer blades.
The dogs of harvest howl and wail,
at the last stroke of the summer’s flail.
Whence the sheaves have all been chopped to straw,
the reapers march and sing their song,
the grains in springtime’s furrows cast,
rise to crown the sky once more.

Hear we offer
summer’s first bread,
upon the altar
of fading day.
Hear we share
summer’s first wine,
within the temple
of golden rays.

Oh gather thy sheaves,
raise thy sickle to the grains,
hear the season call your name.
A golden wreath,
the crown of summer’s day,
hear the season call your name.
Tears of joy,
tears of sorrow,
hear the call, come home again.
A golden wreath,
the crown of summer’s day,
hear the season call your name.

The corn-wolf’s hour is growing short,
soon barley meets the threshing floor.
The seed is seperated from the chaff,
as autumn raises her blade once more.
The fields of grain will soon be razed,
and the wolf will have no place to hide.
Our hope’s in springtimes furrows cast,
shall bid the rye-wolf at last goodbye.

Hear we offer
summer’s first harvest,
upon the altar
of golden earth.
Hear we share
a horn of plenty,
a grateful blessing
of joy and mirth.

Oh gather thy sheaves,
raise thy sickle to the grains,
hear the season call your name.
A golden wreath,
the crown of summer’s day,
hear the season call your name.
Tears of joy,
tears of sorrow,
hear the call, come home again.
A golden wreath,
the crown of summer’s day,
hear the season call yourname.

******

motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Bumper Snickers – The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard

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Daily Stuff 7-22-17 Neptunalia

Hi, folks!

Minus Tide at 6:32 AM of -1.9 feet. Herbs at 11am. Sewing at 3pm.

The sky is completely cloudless unlike yesterday’s fog that lingered well into the afternoon. The marine layer has pulled way back, too, almost to the horizon. Temps in the area range from 59 to 72F, and we’re right at 65. There’s very little wind, only enough to make tender plants tremble. 75% humidity, just enough to obscure distances. …and the days are getting shorter by 2 minutes, now. The Wheel is Turning!

I spent the early part of the day yesterday alternating between customers and newsletter files. I’m not trying to fill in for months ahead, just trying to keep abreast of the immediate. Tempus was still working on the route sheet and he dug into his birthday book, a little, well…. 35 pages worth. I bought him a copy of Beren and Luthien…. and no, his birthday isn’t until September, but neither one of us can wait that long to read it! 🙂

After that I sorted fabrics. I have some ironing to do, since one of the washed fabrics decided to dry in long wrinkles. I also sorted the canned foods that I can’t eat out of the rest of the stuff and put it all into a tote….and then sorted the shelves and then started putting things away. It took several go-rounds since that was a lot of bending.

Tempus went into Newport to run some errands at around 2:30. He had a few specialty groceries to get and to stop at a specific yard sale, along with picking up his check. …and I got several phone calls checking on what I was specifically looking for.

When he got back he sat down and snoozed. Amy came by and I sewed while she took a look at some decorative knotting. After she headed home, Tempus started supper while I did some writing. We had chops and peas for supper and it was very good.

We headed home right before 10pm and I was asleep before long, but Tempus was up for quite awhile, working on his computer. We were up early this morning, since there was an estate sale we wanted to hit. We came back with a rock tumbler and an asthma attack. Ugh, so I’m sitting here wheezing.

We haven’t had a good tumbler at the shop for several years, so the pieces that have been waiting will get going. We’re going to need more grit, though.

There was a fishing heron in the bay when we went past and a lady down on the reef looking for stones.

So today is…. Saturday… it’s the usual things going on today. Fun!

Plato teach kids wise

350px-Sousse_neptuneToday’s Feast is the Neptunalia, celebrated by the Romans in honor of Neptune, god of the sea and Salacia, goddess of the wide-open waters and salt springs. Oddly, no one seems to know much about the festival other than a hint about games, except for the building of leafy canopies to party under.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptunalia and  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune_(god)

plant pic geumToday’s Plant is the Large-Leaved AvensGeum macrophyllum. They’re a beautiful plant in the woods and garden and a food for many butterflies.- Masculine, Jupiter Fire – These plants are used in exorcism mixes, whether incense, amulet or “sprinkle” and for purification, as the live plants can chase nasty influences. If you hate having traveling salesmen or evangelists at your door, plant these along with mint by the pathways. North American species are used in love blends, too. More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geum_macrophyllum More on the family at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geum

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am.  Dark of the Moon, End of the cycle In the time leading up to the “New Moon” you may do banishings and other baneful magicks and healings that require blasting a disease away, as well as using the time for introspection and self-work. Do scrying, now. Good for reversing circumstances. God/dess Aspect: The One Beyond, the Watchers in the Outer Dark, psychopomps – Associated God/desses: Hecate, Kali, Arianhrod, Anja, Kore in the Underworld, Ereshkigal who was Inanna, Set/Seth, Hades, Osiris. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am. 

Coming up! – In bright twilight, look low and use the Moon to find your way to Mercury and Regulus. Mercury moves fast with respect to the background stars; the pair is drawn here for the 24th. On the 25th, Mercury will be closer to Regulus’s lower left.
We’re only a third of the way through summer, but already W-shaped Cassiopeia, a constellation better known for fall and winter evenings, is climbing up in the north-northeast as evening grows late. And the Great Square of Pegasus, emblem of fall, comes up to balance on one corner just over the eastern horizon..
The Big Dipper, still high in the northwest after dark, is turning around to “scoop up water” through the evenings of summer and early fall.
Starry Scorpius is sometimes called “the Orion of Summer” for its brightness and its prominent red supergiant (Antares in the case of Scorpius, Betelgeuse for Orion). But Scorpius is a lot lower in the south than Orion for those of us at mid-northern latitudes. That means Scorpius has only one really good evening month: July. Catch Scorpius due south right after nightfall, before it starts to tilt lower toward the southwest. It’s full of deep-sky objects for binoculars or a telescope — if you have a detailed star atlas to find them with. (See the Pocket Sky Atlas below.)
Uranus (magnitude 5.8, in Pisces) and Neptune (magnitude 7.9, in Aquarius) are high in the southeastern side of the sky before the beginning of dawn. Finder charts

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer enters Leo at 8:15am
Moon in Cancer
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Indigo

Planting 7/21-22 (root veg and short season pumpkins!)

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

******

Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
Sa  22      Low   6:32 AM    -1.9   5:53 AM    Rise  5:09 AM      3
~    22     High   1:01 PM     6.6   8:52 PM     Set  8:20 PM
~    22      Low   6:25 PM     1.9

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – No intention of ours, no matter how noble it may be, is any better or stronger than our ability to remember it!

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Personal Interests and Experiences – List the three most important people you know. Then explain why these people are important (or important to you).

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Quotes  

~  Language is the biggest barrier to human progress because language is an encyclopedia of ignorance. Old perceptions are frozen into language and force us to look at the world in an old fashioned way. Edward De Bono
~  Leap, and the net will appear. – Julia Cameron
~  Man is the only Animal that blushes. Or needs to. – Mark Twain
~  Peace if possible, truth at all costs. – Martin Luther

Deep in the greens of summer sing the lives
I’ve come to love. A vireo whets its bill.
The great day balances upon the leaves;
My ears can hear the bird when all is still. –Theodore Roethke (1908–63)

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Lughnasadh Magick – Crafts

Indian Corn Mosaics – These colorful corn mosaics will add a bright touch to your house! You’ll need to buy a jar of colored popcorn kernels. Draw a seasonal design on a piece of construction paper. Then glue the colorful kernels onto the design. Allow to dry and then hang!

Corn Collage

This project is rated EASY
This project was contributed by:
Madene WalkerWhat

You Need
Scissors
Glue
Popcorn kernels
Popped popcorn
Yellow and green construction paper or printed pattern and crayons to color it

Step 1 – Make the Corn Picture

Cut out a corn cob shape from yellow construction paper and cut out some leaves from green construction paper. You might find it easiest to cut out the corn cob, then lay it on the green paper, then draw the leaves, then cut them out. You can glue the finished shape to thin cardboard if you want to make it sturdier.
Step 2 – Attach the corn
Put glue all over the corn cob section, the glue unpopped or popped corn (or both) to the cob.

You’re Done!
Let the glue dry, then enjoy your decoration. Be sure to hang it up inside, where it won’t get wet!

Corn Magnets (Anja ©2013 M. Bartlett)

Materials
 Sculpey or other oven-bake clay, in green, yellow, gold/ochre and brown. If you’re going to include other representations of the God you’ll also need blue and black.

Rolling pin or flat-sided bottle
Cookie cutters, presses, clay tools or just a small knife and a ruler
Baking sheet
Something to poke a hole with… a skewer, an awl, a ball-point pen…..
Oven
craft magnets, the heavy-duty ones (AS&S has them http://www.sciplus.com/ http://www.sciplus.com/s/c_13/sf_125)
Glue that will stick both metal and plastic, like E-6000.

To make an ear of corn (maize)

  • roll a small “worm” about 2 inches long of yellow.
  • Partially flatten it, maybe I should say “squash down” instead of flatten?
  • Squash one end flat, shoving it back up into the worm. This is the bottom of your “ear”
  • Use your knife to make lines (just press down) longways and then widthways to make it resemble kernels on a cob.
  • Roll out a flat sheet of green and cut two leaf shapes, no longer than your “worm”.
  • Place them on the worm so that they meet on the bottom of the ear and cover the sides, but not the front.
  • Roll the edges back, particularly at the top, to make it look like the leaves.
  • Squish the bottom of the green together to make it look like the start of a stem.
  • You may be done at this point, but it you want to go a little farther with it, take a tiny bit of the ochre and add a bit at the top shaped to look like the silk.
  • Bake on the cookie sheet according to clay directions (they’re different for different brands!)
  • When cool use the glue to stick the magnet to the back of the ear and let dry.

You can make wheat with this process, as well.

  • Roll out a flat irregular sheet of green about 2 x2 inches
  • Roll a very skinny worm of the ochre(less than 1/16 inch and two inches long) and place along the longest part of the green.
  • Trim the green to an egg shape with the worm aligned along the axis. The large end is the bottom.
  • Roll a 1/16 diameter ball of the ochre and put it about ½ inch in from the edge on the long worm. Squash flat.
  • Now, you’re going to make the grains. You’re going to make worms and balls for these. Each worm is the length from the original worm to the edge the green. Roll the tip very small with your finger, measure and then cut.
  • Roll a ball and smash it onto the worm, so that it just is a touch longer than the measurement.
  • Lay these alternating, starting near the top and slightly overlapping the center worm. The worms are the “beards” and the balls are the “grains”.
  • When you get to the bottom make one last ball, squash and add to just cover the bottom of the “worm”.
  • Bake on the cookie sheet according to directions.
  • Let cool.
  • Glue a magnet to the back as before.

You can make many more shapes for these. If you have red or orange, you can make poppies, for instance, brown for bread loaves, etc.

To add the Youth and the Sage to the Grain God, take the original shape before baking. Make two 1 inch flat circles and place them under and to either side of the ear. Make sure they adhere to the original ear before baking.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness

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Daily Stuff 7-21-17 Damo

Hi, folks!

Minus Tide at 5:42 AM of -1.4 feet.

There was a lot of fog as we were coming in this morning. Mostly it was hanging in the treetops, but there was a huge wad on the town end of the bridge. Made it look a bit like Brigadoon…. but it’s clearing away, even as I type. It’s 60F with 84% humidity. You can tell where the fog has lifted. That number is more like 65% there and there’s a spot in South Beach that’s still at 94%.

Yesterday was just one long slog. I was tired. Tempus was working on his route list so he can have someone sub for him so we can get to Arthur’s wedding. It was rather slow for a Thursday, but everyone was saying yesterday that it was slow. I’m hoping folks aren’t saving up for the eclipse weekend. That’s going to be a zoo.

I got over to the fabric store and talked to Rose for a bit. All of us Shop Waldport members are going to have open house during Cruising for Crab. One more thing to go batty over. September 23. I got my fabric, too.

I worked on that during the evening at home. I watched a couple of Townsend and Son videos, did some sewing, did some reading….the usual. I ended up not being on the computer much, though, and I had hoped to get going on a monthly shopping list.

Tempus had a good run with a bobble right at the end. He missed tossing one paper, so had to figure out which one he missed and then go back and fix it, so he got in around 6:30. He told me that he saw a deer when he was on the Bayview loop.

Today I have some stuff on the work table to get put away. I was sorting canned goods. I have to sort my sewing out, too, since I have some cut fabric to get to the right places, my “pincushion stack”. I thought maybe we’d be bottling some wine tonight, but no one else came make it, so we’re going to put that off.

Do happy turtle wise

feast 0721 Bronnikov_gimnpifagoreizevToday’s Feast is that of Damo, daughter of Pythagoras. The story goes that he willed her all his writings and knowing their worth, she taught from them instead of selling them.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damo_(philosopher) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagoreanism

Today’s plant is Wild gingerAsarum caudatum – This is a different plant from the one usually used in magick, but has only slightly different properties. This is related to black pepper, kava and birthwort. –Masculine, Mars, Fire – This is used for “heating up” spells. While standard ginger is used in money, love, success and power spells, Wild Ginger is mostly used to add power, rather than on its own.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asarum_caudatum

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am.  Hecate’s Brooch – 3-5 days before New Moon – Best time for Releasing Rituals. It’s the last few days before the new moon, the time of Hecate’s Brooch. This is the time that if you’re going to throw something out, or sweep the floors, or take stuff to Good Will, do it! Rid yourself of negativity and work on the letting go process. Release the old, removing unwanted negative energies, addictions, or illness. Do physical and psychic cleansings. Good for wisdom & psychic ability. Goddess Aspect: Crone – Associated God/desses: Callieach, Banshee, Hecate, Baba Yaga, Ereshkigal, Thoth. Phase ends at the Dark on 7/21 at 2:46pm. Dark of the Moon, End of the cycle In the time leading up to the “New Moon” you may do banishings and other baneful magicks and healings that require blasting a disease away, as well as using the time for introspection and self-work. Do scrying, now. Good for reversing circumstances. God/dess Aspect: The One Beyond, the Watchers in the Outer Dark, psychopomps – Associated God/desses: Hecate, Kali, Arianhrod, Anja, Kore in the Underworld, Ereshkigal who was Inanna, Set/Seth, Hades, Osiris. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am. 

Crescent Moon with Venus early in the dawn of Thursday the 20th.
Starry Scorpius is sometimes called “the Orion of Summer” for its brightness and its prominent red supergiant (Antares in the case of Scorpius, Betelgeuse for Orion). But Scorpius is a lot lower in the south than Orion for those of us at mid-northern latitudes. That means Scorpius has only one really good evening month: July. Catch Scorpius due south just after dark now, before it starts to tilt lower toward the southwest. It’s full of deep-sky objects for binoculars or a telescope — if you have a detailed star atlas to find them with (see below).
Saturn (magnitude +0.2, in the legs of Ophiuchus) glows steadily in the south during and after dusk. Fiery Antares, less bright, twinkles 13° to Saturn’s lower right. Delta Scorpii, the third brightest object in the area, catches the eye half that far to the right or upper right of Antares.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Gemini enters Cancer at 1:04pm
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: rose

Planting 7/21-22 (root veg and short season pumpkins!)

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
F   21      Low   5:42 AM    -1.4   5:52 AM    Rise  4:07 AM      9
~    21     High  12:10 PM     6.2   8:53 PM     Set  7:24 PM
~    21      Low   5:28 PM     2.1
~    21     High  11:27 PM     8.7

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Do we take for granted? I would say a lot of people do. You have to love what’s in front of you, and keep memories of the ones we have lost. Unfortunately we all grow older every day, and life can be short, I know, I have lost friends, family, and I think, what was the last thing I said to them and I hope I made some kind of impact on their life, even if it was a smile. So to all my friends and family, to those that care and love us, I do thank you, for your love, a smile, a thank you, or even a good laugh. I have a lot of special people in my life, and thank you for being a part of it.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Multicultural Connections – If you could learn one foreign language, which one would you choose? Explain your answer.

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Quotes  

~  The chief danger in life is that you may take too many precautions. – Alfred Adler
~  The ego-self is the root that causes our pain. Our pains are all because of something that has to do with “I”. The less any happenings affect me, the less intense the pain. Desire is the most difficult fire for human beings to control. – Tsai Chih
~  The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with Nature. – Joseph Campbell
~  The greatest gift you can give another is the purity of your attention. – Richard Moss

To bring about a society that is not repetitive, nor static, a society that is constantly alive, it is imperative that there should be a revolution in the psychological structure of the individual, for without inward, psychological revolution, mere transformation of the outer has very little significance. – J. Krishnamurti

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Lughnasadh Magick – http://www.wilsonsalmanac.com/lammas.html (site is defunct) 

Our road starts where they say all roads end: Rome.

The Roman Catholic church claimed to have in its possession one of the chains with which the Apostle Peter was bound, and from which the angel delivered him. The empress Eudocia brought the two chains in 439 from Jerusalem, sending one to Constantinople and the other to Rome. Over many years, the popes sent miracle-performing filings of it to devout princes. August 1 is known as the Feast Day of the Chains of St Peter – in Latin, Peter ad Vincula.

The month of August was the first in the Egyptian calendar, and called Gule, which when Latinized makes Gula, which in Latin signifies throat. Seeing the word at the head of the month’s calendar, the Roman Catholic Church made the day a feast to the Christian daughter of the Roman tribune Quirinus, who was cured of a throat disease by kissing the chain of Peter on the day of its festival. “Forcing the Gule of the Egyptians into the throat of the tribune’s daughter, they instituted a festival to Gule upon the festival-day of St Peter ad Vincula.”  (Every-day Book, William Hone 1878)

We are also celebrating Lammas, or Lughnasadh; however, the modern date for Lughnasadh, as for the other great Celtic festivals, Imbolc, Beltane and Samhain, is only an approximation made necessary by a solar calendar. In Ireland, the festival began in mid-July, and lasted till mid-August, but its main focus was August 1. In the Asatru tradition, that day is sacred to the Norse deities Odin and Frigg; celebrants used to ascend the spiral path of the Lammas hill, on way to Lammas festivities.

What is it?

In the Northern Hemisphere, halfway between the Summer Solstice and the Autumn Equinox, comes the ancient Celtic pagan festival of Lughnasadh, also called Lughnasa (or the modern Irish spelling, Lúnasa) and Lammas, one of the eight Sabbats – one of the High Holidays, or four Greater Sabbats – of the Celtic Wheel of the Year. (This is the least known of the four seasonal cross-quarter days. Certainly, Samhain (Halloween) and Beltane (May Day) get more press in our age.) In the Southern Hemisphere, some neo-pagans call this time Imbolc, after the station of the year directly opposite Lammas on the Wheel.

Lammas comes from Old English hlaf maesse, meaning ‘loaf mass’, the Christian holy repast at which bread baked from the first wheat of the season was blessed. Many cultures have the ceremony of the first of the harvest being sacrificially given to the gods, or god; the ancient Hebrews offered their ‘first fruits’ to Jehovah, just as the Bemanti clan of Swaziland offer theirs to their king during December’s full moon, in the Ncwala ceremony. When Christianity came to the Celtic lands, most ancient festivals such as Lughnasadh were imbued by the Church with Christian symbolism, so loaves of bread were baked from the first of the harvested grain and consecrated on the church altar on the first Sunday of August, a tradition still enacted in many churches.

Some have claimed that the word is from Lamb-Mass, “because on that day the tenants who held lands under the cathedral church in York, which is dedicated to St Peter ad Vincula, were bound by their tenure to bring a live lamb into the church at high mass; others derive it from a supposed offering or tything of lambs at this time” (Hone 1878).

The similarity of the pre-Christian name Lughnasadh to the Christian name Lammas might be more than coincidental, but it is a contended matter. The etymology might go something like this: the Celtic word nasadh meant ‘commemoration’, or ‘to give in marriage’; the Anglo-Saxons called this festival Lughmass; because it took place between the hay harvest and the corn harvest, the name was later confused with hlaf maesse; hence ‘Lammas’. We might, however, as easily assume that ‘Lughnasadh’ means the ‘Marriage of Lugh, as ‘Lugh’s Mass’, a rather common interpretation.

Lugh, Celtic sun god

The god associated with the season is a Celtic sun god, Lugh, whose name is related to the Latin lux, or, ‘light’, and means ‘the shining one’.

He was handsome, perpetually youthful, and full of vivacity and energy. Poet and author Robert Graves proposed that his name came from the Latin lucus (‘grove’), and even perhaps lu, Sumerian for son. Lugh was a deity cognate to Hercules or Dionysus, the Romans’ version of the Greek god Apollo. Another name for him was ‘Lugh the Long Handed’. In Wales, he was called Lleu, or Lleu Llaw Gyffes, meaning ‘Lion with the Steady Hand’. Lleu means lion, related to the Latin leo. (Note that the Zodiacal sign of Leo is now in the sun.)

Although we are uncertain whether the Gauls’ name of this Celtic deity was Romanised to Lugus/Lugos, (whom they identified with the god Mercury), or vice versa, we do know that the impact of both the name and the deity were widespread. Lyons in France, for example, was originally called Lugudunum, or the Fort of Lugus, and a festival formerly held there on August 1 was later renamed after Caesar Augustus who had assumed major deity authority. The European towns of Laon, Leyden and Carlisle (originally Caer Lugubalion) also were all named after Lugh, and the modern name Hugh also derives from the deity.

Let the games begin!

Several important and hugely attended assemblies, all involving Olympics-like games, took place during Lughnasadh in Ireland, and there is growing evidence of such games throughout Europe, because Celtic culture took root from Ireland to as far as Galatia, the Middle Eastern town mentioned in the Bible (Paul’s Epistle to the Galatians – the word is etymologically related to ‘Celtia’).

Lammas and athletic contests go hand in hand. Ranggeln, an ancient style of wrestling from which the terms ‘wrangle’ and thus ‘Wrangler jeans’ derive, is still practised in Austria. The St Jacob’s Day (July 29) Ranggeln festival at the summit of Mt Hundstein harks back to pre-Christian Celtic Lughnasadh festivities.

The Oenach Tailten was the assembly of Tailte, held at Talten or Teltown, a mountain in Meath, for the fifteen days on either side of August 1. Fostering was a Celtic practice that survived into early 18th century Scotland, and the goddess Tailte (Tailtiu), for whom the Oenach Tailten were held and the games played, was Lugh’s foster-mother, a female chieftain of the Fir-Bolg. After she and her people were vanquished by the Tuatha De Dannan, she was ordered by them to clear a large forest for the purpose of planting a field of grain, and Tailte died of exhaustion in the attempt.  The legend tells us that she was buried beneath a large mound named for her, at the place where the first feast of Lughnasadh was held in Ireland, the hill of Tailte. Lugh’s birth mother was Ethnea Ní Bhaloir. Lughnasadh also commemorated Lugh’s two wives, Nas and Bui, so a strong feminine aspect can be seen in Lughnasadh, as well as its primary masculine theme of the solar deity.

Fun, fun, fun, including divorce

When ancient Celts went to a Lughnasadh celebration, they could expect to find many features of a modern fair or market day, not just sports and sacrality. Crafts (probably including ‘corn dollies’, which are still a Lammas tradition), preserves, all kinds of foods and local produce would certainly have been displayed and sold at the games, so it must have been a fun and colourful affair.

One ancient custom still associated with cross-quarter days, and in particular Lughnasadh, was for a large wagon wheel to be dragged to the top of a hill, covered with tar, and set on fire; then it was blazingly rolled down the hill – perhaps recalling the end of summer, with the flaming disk representing the declining sun deity. This, in Christian times, evolved into the popular firework, the Catherine wheel, since St Catherine of Alexandria (who was intended to be martyred on a wheel but survived miraculously), was commemorated on her feast day at Lammas (though the Church has moved it several times) and the wheel rolling continued as part of her day.

Lughnasadh was seen as a propitious season in which to marry, as food was abundant between the two harvests for the ‘honey moon’, and leisure time was available once the harvest was in. At the Oenach Tailten began a widespread custom called a Tailtean (or Teltown) marriage, similar to neo-Pagan ‘handfasting’, and it only took place at Lughnasadh. Such a marriage lasted only a ‘year and a day’ and could only be dissolved if both parties returned to the Lughnasadh fair. To divorce, the spouses stood back-to-back, then one spouse walked to the north and the other south. This custom carried on well into the 16th century and, like bundling (‘[occupying] the same bed without undressing – said of a man and woman, especially during courtship’ – Webster), which was known even later and certainly in colonial America, was considered proper, even by the Christian Church.

Another of these great Lughnasadh festivals was the Oenach Carmain, the assembly of Carmán the evil sorceress. She, like the Fomorians (evil giants; the people of the other world) came to Ireland from Athens, accompanied by her three ferocious sons. The people of Leinster province, at Carman or Wexford held the Oenach Carmain, once every three years, beginning on Lughnasadh and ending on the sixth, believing that by holding it they would receive various blessings, such as prosperity, and corn, milk, and fruit in abundance, as well as protection from incursions by other provinces. There also were racing, poetic competition, satirical drama, and history, with a strong role played by women, who had political meetings called aireachts. Probably due to the influence of the patriarchal Christian Church, the Oenach Carmain only lasted until the 11th Century.

As well as the sports played at this event, there were marriage contracts made in the ‘Marriage Hollow’. In Europe, the festival of Lughnasadh was also associated with the myth of the marriage of Lugh to Bloddeuedd. This goddess, whose name means ‘face of flowers’, was conjured up out of flowers of oak, broom, and meadowsweet, by Lugh’s uncle, King Math, to be Lugh’s consort. When she later turned out to be an unfaithful wife, she was cursed by Gwydion, brother of the moon goddess Arianrhod, to be forever disturbed by sunlight, and she experienced a shapeshift into an owl, a creature said to be hated by all other birds.

At gatherings of Lammastide, villagers placed offerings of blackberries, acorns, and crab apples in the lap of a maiden dressed in white, seated on the top of a hill, and a dance and procession home would then be held.

Was King William Rufus a pagan sacrifice?

The Celts celebrate the main part of the festival of Lughnasadh from sunset on August 1 until sunset on August 2. On August 2, 1100 English King William Rufus was killed when shot through the eye by an arrow while hunting in the New Forest. Rufus (‘the Red’) was a son of William the Conqueror, and his elder brother, Richard, had also died in the New Forest. Rumours probably abounded that Richard and Rufus were victims of heathen ill will, for William the Conqueror had expelled the dwellers of the New Forest. These were the pagans, for that is what the word pagan originally meant.

\Pagan\ (p[=a]”gan), n. [L. paganus a countrymanpeasant, villager, a pagan, fr. paganus of or pertaining to the country, rustic, also, pagan, fr. pagus a districtcanton, the country, perh. orig., a district with fixed boundaries: cf. pangere to fasten. Cf. {Painim}, {Peasant}, and {Pact}, also {Heathen}.] Source

Pagans were thus the dwellers in the forest/countryside, whose old religions were at odds with, and ruthlessly suppressed by, monotheistic religions like Christianity and Islam, the hegemonies of which led to the longstanding pejorative connotations of the term.

The legend says that on the night of August 1, Rufus dreamt of his blood reaching to heaven, darkening the sky. The same night, an English monk dreamt that King William Rufus entered a church and picked up a crucifix; he gnawed at Christ’s arm, then the figure kicked him, making him fall backwards, and smoke and flames came out of his mouth. Rufus heard about this dream but dismissed it. The a third dream occurred, and on August 2 a messenger brought Rufus a letter from Abbot Serlo in Gloucester, saying a parishioner had dreamt on the same night of a virgin (the Church) pleading at the feet of Christ to be freed from her oppressor (Rufus), and Jesus had assured her he would. William, who had many enemies, for he was known as an oppressor of England, taxing the people heavily, took no heed of all these prescient warnings.

It’s possible that William the Red was killed by his younger brother who was with him on that hunting trip and was crowned King Henry I almost immediately. Tradition has it that William’s bleeding body was taken by a charcoal burner named Purkiss, to Winchester Palace, and for his kindness he was rewarded with an acre or two of land. (It is interesting to note that a charcoal-burning family named Purkiss still lived on the same land at least as late as the 1880s.)

Sacrificial kingship

It’s widely believed amongst neo-Pagans that William and other kings who died violent deaths on or near Celtic cross-quarter days, such as this one, were actually victims of sacrificial kingship. This ritual of pre-Christian times in Europe was related to giving thanks to the sun for a good harvest. Such sacrifice was also practised in ancient Greece, and the Celts might have acquired the practice from there.

Lughnasadh would be the time for the king to reaffirm his sacred ‘marriage’ to the prosperity of the kingdom. One notes that both the murder of King Olaf of Norway, and his feast day, are close to Lammastide (July 29); sacrificial kingship is also known in other parts of Europe. Also, apparently it is known in Africa: Walby, Celestin, ‘The African Sacrificial Kingship Ritual and Johnson’s Middle Passage’, African American Review 29.4 (1995): 657-669. It has strong connections with the self-sacrifice of Odin in Norse mythology, and to the Christian myth of the Crucifixion and Resurrection.

William Rufus might have been the last pagan sacrifice of a king, and his death disguised for the Christian authorities as a hunting accident. Some of the clergy, by the way, hated Rufus and saw his death as divine judgment, while some contemporary accounts said he was accidentally shot by his friend William Tirel.

Harvest, death and rebirth

Despite its marital associations, Lughnasadh was also a mourning feast. A long tradition of a symbolic funeral procession during Lammas continues today in Lancashire, England’s Wakes Week, and long wake processions such as one across the Yorkshire moors, called the Lyke Wakes Walk.

To this day, young men carry an empty coffin about 60 km (about 40 miles) along an ancient track. We must bear in mind that while Lughnasadh is Lugh’s marriage, when the sun is called upon to allow a successful harvest from the feminine earth, it is also Lugh’s wake, for he is the Sun-King, whose light begins to pale after the Summer Solstice.

Lughnasadh, too, recalls the theme of death, because, as the first of the three harvest Sabbats, (Lughnasadh, Mabon and Samhain), ancient people celebrated the ripening grains and corn, which must be mowed (killed) for ‘rebirth’ to begin. The Greek story of Demeter and Persephone, likewise, is a story about the cycle of death and rebirth associated with grain. Here is where the theme of the sacrificed god motif is so central, Lugh’s death being essential for rebirth of the land to take place.

Lugh’s death is a sacrifice that will occur again with the new growth in the spring, and must be repeated each year. Thus it was that pagan kings sometimes had a duty to sacrifice themselves for the land, although we do not fully know to what extent human or animal sacrifice occurred in pagan cultures. All we know is that in those times, kings did at times allowed themselves to be sacrificed at the end of the year, whereupon a new king could be appointed and the cycle could begin anew.

Waverly Fitzgerald* has an excellent article at School of the Seasons, called Celebrating Lammas, so why not pay her a visit? She writes,

“Lammas is a festival of regrets and farewells, of harvest and preserves. Reflect on these topics alone in the privacy of your journal or share them with others around a fire. Lughnasad is one of the great Celtic fire-festivals, so if at all possible, have your feast around a bonfire. While you’re sitting around the fire, you might want to tell stories.”

As a final word on this ancient calendar custom, I add that ‘At latter Lammas’ is an old English expression meaning ‘never’. And never shall we see the likes of earlier Lammas.

Some Lammas snippets

“It was once customary in England, in contravention of the proverb, that a cat in mittens catches no mice, to give money to servants on Lammas-day, to buy gloves; hence the term ‘Glove-Silver’. It is mentioned among the ancient customs of the abbey of St Edmund’s, in which the clerk of the cellarer had 2d; the cellarer’s squire, 11d; the granger, 11d; and the cowherd a penny. Anciently, too, it was customary for every family to give annually to the pope on this day, one penny, which was called Denarius Sancti Petri, or Peter’s Penny.”
Hampson’s Medii Aevi Kalendarium

 ‘Prodigies’ and omens at William’s Death

The Biddenden Maids were conjoined twins who were born in Biddenden, Kent, in 1100. In the popular imagination of the time, the death of King William was associated with the Maids and other ‘anomalous’ occurrences.

“It may be urged that the date fixed for the birth of the Biddenden Maids is so remote as to throw grave doubt upon the reality of the occurrence. The year 1100 was, it will be remembered, that in which William Rufus was found dead in the New Forest, (with the arrow either of a hunter or an assassin in his breast.’ According to the Anglo-saxon Chronicle, several ‘prodigies’ preceded the death of this profligate and extravagant monarch. Thus it is recorded that ‘at Pentecost blood was observed gushing from the earth at a certain town of Berkshire, even as many asserted who declared that they had seen it. And after this, on the morning after Lammas Day, King William was shot.’ Now, it is just possible that the birth of the Biddenden Maids may have occurred later, but have been antedated by the popular tradition to the year above mentioned. For such a birth would, in the opinion of the times, be regarded undoubtedly as a most evident prodigy or omen of evil. Still, even admitting that the date 1100 must be allowed to stand, its remoteness from the present time is not a convincing argument against a belief in the real occurrence of the phenomenon; for of the dicephlic Scottish brothers, who lived in 1490, we have credible historic evidence. Further, Lycosthenes, in his ‘Chronicon Prodigiorom atque Ostentorum’, published in 1557, states, upon what authority I know not, that in the year 1112 joined twins resembling the Biddenden phenomenon in all points save in sex were born in England.” – Ballantyne

Corn dollies, by the Weather Doctor

In many agrarian communities, the last harvested sheaf of grain was treated with special honour, for the farmers believed that with the cutting of the last sheaf, the corn spirit retreated into the soil. There in its underground refuge, the corn spirit slept throughout the Winter until Spring. In the Spring that last sheaf was returned to the fields when new seed was being sown, so that its spirit would awaken both seed and land.

One traditional Lammas custom was the construction of the kern-baby, corn dolly, or corn maiden. This figure, braided into a woman’s form from the last harvested sheaf of grain, represented the Harvest Spirit. (In America, the tradition is continued in the making of corn husk dolls.) The doll would be saved until Spring, when it was ploughed into the field to consecrate the new planting and insure a good harvest. In other traditions, the corn dolly was fed and watered throughout the Winter, then burned in the fires at Beltane to insure a continuation of good growth.
Keith C Heidorn, PhD, The Weather Doctor   Source

Lothian, Scotland

Before Lammas, Lothian cow-boys, (as ‘cowboys’ used to be spelt in Britain) used to build a tower of stones and sods in a conspicuous place. On Lammas morning they assembled there, bearing flags and blowing cow horns. They breakfasted on bread and cheese, then had a procession and foot races. Each group would try to demolish the tower of a neighbouring group and sometimes bloody fights would ensue.

Ladybird prognostication   

Folklorist Charles Kightly (Perpetual Almanack of Folklore, Thames and Hudson, 1987) says that Lammas is a time at which spirits walk abroad, and hence a good time to divine the future.

He says that to learn the whereabouts of your lover’s home, take a ladybird and address her thus before releasing her:

Lady, Lady, Lanners [Lammas? – PW]
Tak your cloak about your heid
And fly away to Flanders
Fly ower moor and fly ower mead
Fly ower living, fly ower dead
Fly ye east or fly ye west
Fly to her that loves me best.

Manx Holy Wells at Lammas

On the Isle of Man, in the Irish Sea, where they speak the language known as Manx, Lammas is called “Lal Lhuanys”, and this great festivals of the Druids is still observed. The first Sunday in August was called “Yn chied doonaght a ouyr” by the Manx peasantry who would climb the highest hills in the country on that day, as well as visiting the various sacred healing wells. The most famous of these today is the Well of St Maughold, which was first described in the 7th Century in the Book of Armagh. The water of this well has always been honoured for its health-giving properties, and on Lammas Day, islanders come to drink its sanative waters. The Manx bishop is said to have blessed St Maughold’s Well so that it will give fertility if one drinks from it while seated in the ‘Saint’s Chair’.

To quote the Book of Armagh:

And in the cemetery of its church is a sarcophagus of hollow stone, out of which a spring continually exudes, nay, freely floweth, which is sweet to the palate, wholesome to the taste, and healeth divers infirmities, and the deadliness of poison; for whoso drinketh thereof, either receiveth instant health or instantly dieth. In that stone the bones of St. Machaldus are said to rest, yet nothing is found therein save the clear water only; and though many have often times endeavoured to remove the stone, and especially the King of the Norici (of Norway ?), who subdued the island, that he might at all times have sweet water, yet have they all failed in their attempts; for the deeper they dug to raise the stone, so much the more deeply and firmly did they find it fixed in the heart of the earth.

The goddess Habondia

Many neo-Pagans give praise at Lammastide to Habondia, the generous one, the Goddess of the Harvest, for the abundance and prosperity that she brings. At Lammas she is seen in her pregnant and birthing aspects as she ripens and swells with the life that she now brings forth, and the earth reflects this growing fruitfulness. The Great Mother is seen as having moved through the seasons from the promise of new life in February (Imbolc) to the fulfilment of that promise with the harvest beginning in August.

 

The Games of Lugh

This is an old Celtic name for the Perseids, the most familiar of all meteor showers, that take place at around this time of year. Associated with the Swift-Tuttle Comet, the Perseids have been well documented since at least 830 CE and take their name from the constellation Perseus where shooting stars appear. We can well imagine ancient Celts looking upon these wonders and associating them with other phenomena of the season between the equinox and solstice, including the heat of the last of the Dog Days. They attributed the celestial display of Perseid lights to games being played by their sun god, Lugh, ‘the shining one’.

As is well known, most ancient cultures looked on meteor showers and other phenomena in the sky as having supernatural meaning. In pre-Zoroastrian India, the Perseids were the Pairikas, the prototypes of the Peris, the nymphs or female angels of later Persian tradition, and likewise the Parigs or witches of Manichaeism. The Pairikas, in the form of worm-stars, are said to fly between the earth and the heavens at this time. These ‘shooting stars’ fall annually at about the time when Tistrya (Sirius) is supposed to be most active.

The remarkable annual appearance of the Perseids might explain why the ancient Egyptian Lychnapsia (‘Festival of Lights’, or ‘The Lights of Isis’) at this time of year was revered in the Osirian mysteries. In Arab folklore, shooting stars are traditionally said to be firebrands hurled by the angels against the inquisitive Jinns or Genii, who are forever clambering up on the constellations to peep into heaven.

 

Loch-mo-Naire pilgrimage

An ancient healing waters custom from Scotland that was practised annually on August 4, leading one to postulate that it was a Lammas commemoration. Its rites contain actions that remind one not only of Celtic practices, but also the Christian sacrament of baptism.

Loch-mo-Naire, a lake in Strathnavon, Sutherlandshire, famous for its supposed miraculous healing qualities, was a site of pilgrimage for the lame, sick, impotent, and mentally ill. At midnight, these faithful unfortunates would gather on the shore of the loch to drink from its sanative waters, strip naked, and walk backwards into the loch. After immersing themselves three times, they would throw offerings of silver coins into the depths.

An old tradition informs us how the loch obtained its wondrous qualities and its name. Long, long ago, an old woman had somehow come to own some bright crystals, which, when placed in water, had miraculous powers of rendering the liquid an infallible cure for all “the ills to which flesh is heir”. As the fame of these wonder-working pebbles soon spread far and wide, it soon attracted the greed of a member of the neighbouring Gordon clan, who made up his mind to secure the miraculous crystals for the Gordons’ exclusive use.

To this end, Gordon feigned sickness, but the moment he presented himself to the crone, she divined his intention and fled. Escape, however, was impossible, because she was old and her pursuer had youth and swiftness on his side. Yet rather than surrender her charm-stones she threw them into the first lake to which she came, exclaiming, as she did, “Mo naire!”, meaning, “shame!” She then prophesied that the waters of Loch-mo-Naire would heal all who dipped in them or drank of them, except for those who belonged to the accursed Gordon tribe. (No offence intended if you’re a Gordon!)

Writing in 1897, William S Walsh (Curiosities of Popular Customs and of Rites, Ceremonies, Observances, and Miscellaneous Antiquities, JB Lippincott Company) tells us that the tale of the crone is evidently very much more recent than the superstition connected with the lake’s healing charms. Loch-mo-Naire does not, in fact, mean ‘the loch of shame’, but ‘the serpent’s loch’, the word for serpent, nathair, being pronounced exactly in the same way was naire meaning ‘shame’. Walsh writes, “This manifestly points to the great archaeological fact that almost everywhere the serpent is represented as the guardian of waters supposed to possess curative virtues. It is also the recognized emblem of Aesculapius, the god of the healing art, who himself sometimes appeared in the form of a serpent.”

A WWW source local to Loch-mo-Naire asserts that the loch’s name derives from that of an ancient Celtic goddess and that the immersion rites continued there until the First World War.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Sniglet – Any word which should be in the dictionary but isn’t.

Cornextortion – When you go to the movie theatre and ask for a small popcorn, the guy behind the counter says, “for ONLY 25 cents more you can get a large popcorn”. Moviegoers, watch out for this common tactic.

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Daily Stuff 7-20-17 The Eagle has landed

Hi, folks!

Featured photo courtesy of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. Minus Tide at 4:48 AM of -0.9 feet. Sewing 6-8pm.

It’s lovely weather today, not as brightly sunny as it’s been, since the sky is about 1/2 covered with fluffy thin clouds, but they don’t obscure the sun, just dim it a bit. The wind is nearly still here in town and it’s just 70. That’s about the right temp to sit at my desk or to sew and not go rumpusing around to sort things. 🙂 It’s a few degrees cooler by the water, but there’s not even very much wind today. 4mph on the beach in Bayshore….

Yesterday was spent entirely at home. We got up fairly late and Tempus went to help our landlady load some stuff into her vehicle and then do some chores upstairs. I started by sorting out my small rolly that sits near the bed, making sure that the things I use were near the top and keepsie stuff tucked away in the bottom drawers. I had gone from that to sorting the whatsit clothes basket and was pretty much standing on my head in the corner when the folks showed up to help move the sewing machine! That apparently went very easily and then we all stood around and talked for a bit. We now have room for our chairs at the table!

After they headed home Tempus and I went back to chores. I sorted more things in the shelves in the galley and he found some things that had gotten misplaced, then got the chairs pulled out and upright. He went to the shop to take a load of stuff that has places to live there but not at the apartment, and brought back some stuff for supper. Eventually we both ran out of steam and ended up in bed, reading, working on the computer and I was sewing a bit.

I had a rough night, so Tempus let me sleep this morning, just an extra hour and a half, but it helped. We’re both at the shop now (yes, that’s why this is late) and working. Mostly we’re sorting what we brought from the apartment, but eventually I’m going to be working in back, then sewing, and we have the Sewing Workshop tonight at 6pm. If anyone shows up we can work on either pincushions or balls.

A heron at Sandy Point Park on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. Courtesy of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.

heron Sandy Point State Park Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum Photo Jennifer Casey Photography

201px-Apollo_11_insigniaIn 1969 on this day the first moon landing was made. “”Contact light!” Three seconds later, Eagle landed and Armstrong said “Shutdown.” Aldrin immediately said “Okay, engine stop. ACA – out of detent.” Armstrong acknowledged “Out of detent. Auto” and Aldrin continued “Mode control – both auto. Descent engine command override off. Engine arm – off. 413 is in.” Charles Duke, acting as CAPCOM during the landing phase, acknowledged their landing by saying “We copy you down, Eagle.” Armstrong acknowledged Aldrin’s completion of the post landing checklist with “Engine arm is off.” before responding to Duke with the words, “Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.” Armstrong’s change of call sign from “Eagle” to “Tranquility Base” confirmed that landing was complete and successful, and Duke mispronounced his reply as he expressed the relief at Mission Control: “Roger, Twan– Tranquility, we copy you on the ground. You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We’re breathing again. Thanks a lot.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11

motif plant red huckleberry Vaccinium_parvifolium_0325Today’s plant is Red Huckleberry, Vaccinium parvifolium, which grows mostly at low to middle elevations in soil enriched by decaying wood and on rotten logs, all over the coast range. It is a deciduous shrub growing to 13 ft tall with a small, edible red to blue-black berry. The local peoples ate, dried, stewed and made sauces from this berry which was one of their staple foods. The bark is a cold remedy. The leaves make a good tea. I make jam of the berries, which also make a tasty tea. Both berries and leaves are good for sore throats, aching teeth and inflamed gums. It’s sometimes used as an ornamental, but it doesn’t take well to getting the roots disturbed. –Feminine, Venus, Water – Carry for luck, health (especially teeth/throat),  to keep away evil and break hexes, Burn to make dreams come true. Dried berries can be used for prosperity magicks. More info and links here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaccinium_parvifolium

magick motif slav Kolovrat RodnoverPerun’s Day – Cherven (July) 20 – This is the holiday on which the Great God of Thunder, Perun, is celebrated. On this day human sacrifices (the slaying of a man or woman for God), were made on 12th of Cherven (July). At that time, a bull was also sacrificed and people feasted on the animal. The King and the Volvhs organized a spectacular fete with plays and much merry-making. “In the year 6491, the old men would make the decision; ‘Cast lots on a boy and a girl. Destiny will decide who will be sacrificed.’ There was a Varagian Christian who had a son. The lot [for sacrifice] fell on his son.” (From Povest Vremeniih Let [The Tale of Years Past])

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am.  Hecate’s Brooch – 3-5 days before New Moon – Best time for Releasing Rituals. It’s the last few days before the new moon, the time of Hecate’s Brooch. This is the time that if you’re going to throw something out, or sweep the floors, or take stuff to Good Will, do it! Rid yourself of negativity and work on the letting go process. Release the old, removing unwanted negative energies, addictions, or illness. Do physical and psychic cleansings. Good for wisdom & psychic ability. Goddess Aspect: Crone – Associated God/desses: Callieach, Banshee, Hecate, Baba Yaga, Ereshkigal, Thoth. Phase ends at the Dark on 7/21 at 2:46pm.

Any of these mornings! This is glorious!
With the advance of summer, the Sagittarius Teapot, in the south after dark now, is starting to tilt and pour from its spout to the right. The Teapot will tilt farther and farther for the rest of the summer — or for much of the night, if you stay out very late.
Jupiter (magnitude –1.9, in Virgo) shines brightly in the west to southwest in early evening. Spica (magnitude +1.0) glitters 9° left of it. In a telescope, Jupiter has shrunk to 36 arcseconds wide.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Gemini
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Crimson

Harvest 19-20

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
Th  20      Low   4:48 AM    -0.9   5:51 AM    Rise  3:13 AM      17
~    20     High  11:12 AM     5.8   8:54 PM     Set  6:19 PM
~    20      Low   4:28 PM     2.2
~    20     High  10:33 PM     8.5

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Translate fear into excited anticipation.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – I wish… – I wish I could hear……

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Quotes  

~  If you’re not experiencing difficulties, problems or pain you have probably aimed too low. – Price Pritchett
~  Ill it is to sit lamenting for what cannot be had. – Volsunga Saga, c.24
~  In order to be a realist you must believe in miracles. – David Ben Gurion
~  It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man. – Norse Adage

Beyond me in the fields the sun
Soaks in the grass and hath his will;
I count the marguerites one by one;
Even the buttercups are still. – Archibald Lampman (1861–99)

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Lughnasadh Magick – Recipes

Pulled Pork Sliders – Kate Mathis – Provided by: Taste Editors from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/27/pulled-pork-sliders_n_1061216.html

1 hr 30 mins total

These delicious sliders are good to make when you want to serve something a bit more substantial then appetizers for a party. You’ll need time for the pork to marinate in a dry rub—overnight is best—and time for slow cooking, so plan ahead. For the barbecue sauce, you can make your own, or use your favorite commercial brand. Many barbecue lovers feel that beer goes best with barbecue, but slightly chilled rioja or Barbera taste might fine with pulled pork, too.

Recipe from Wine Bites by Barbara Scott-Goodman/Chronicle Books, 2011.

Ingredients

  • 1 pork roast (3 to 4 lb), preferably pork shoulder or Boston butt
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • DRY RUB:
  • 3 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp kosher salt
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • freshly ground pepper
  • BARBECUE SAUCE:
  • 1 tbsp corn oil
  • 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 cups tomato sauce
  • 3/4 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp chili powder
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • dash of hot-pepper sauce
  • 16 slider rolls or 8 hamburger rolls, split

Directions

  • Pat the pork dry and brush with the olive oil.
  • To make the dry rub, in a small bowl, stir together the paprika, salt, sugars, cumin, chili powder, cayenne, and black pepper to taste. Rub the dry rub all over the pork, wrap in plastic wrap, and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours or up to overnight.
  • Preheat the oven to 300°F/150°C/gas 2. Put the pork on a rack in a large roasting pan/tray and roast until an instant-read thermometer registers 170°F/80°C, about 6 hours.
  • To make the barbecue sauce: Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until softened and golden, about 5 minutes. Add the ketchup/tomato sauce, vinegar, brown sugar/demerara sugar, chili powder, mustard, and hot-pepper sauce and stir to mix well. Simmer gently, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens and the flavors blend, 20 to 25 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary.
  • Remove the pork roast from the oven and transfer to a cutting board or large platter. Tent loosely with aluminum foil and let rest for 15 to 20 minutes. “Pull” the pork apart with 2 forks to form shreds and transfer to a large bowl. Add the sauce to the shredded pork.
  • To serve, spoon the pulled pork onto the bottom halves of the slider or hamburger rolls, dividing it evenly. Replace the tops of the buns; if using regular hamburger rolls, cut each sandwich in half. Serve at once.

Gnudi: Spinach and Ricotta Dumplings – Andrea Wyner – Provided by: Taste Editors – Recipe courtesy of Cucina Povera: Tuscan Peasant Cooking by Pamela Sheldon Johns/Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2011. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/27/gnudi-spinach-and-ricott_n_1061492.html

  • 25 mins total
  • 10 mins prep

Gnudi means, well, “nude” – because these are nude ravioli, the filling without the outer pasta covering. They are delicious served with tomato sauce, as in this recipe, or with melted butter and sage.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup steamed spinach, finely chopped
  • 3/4 cup whole-milk ricotta cheese
  • 1/2 cup grated pecorino or Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 3 cups tomato sauce

Directions

  • In a large bowl, combine the spinach, ricotta, pecorino, and egg yolks. Stir to blend. Stir in the nutmeg and salt to taste, then gently stir in the flour, mixing just enough to pull the mixture together.
  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Heat the tomato sauce and spread a thin layer of it over the bottom of a 9 by 13-inch baking dish. Set aside.
  • Using two tablespoons, shape and compact the ricotta mixture into ovals and drop them directly into the boiling water in batches, so as not to crowd the pot. They will float to the top when done, after 3 to 4 minutes.
  • Using a wire skimmer or slotted spoon, transfer the gnudi to the casserole dish. Keep warm in a low oven. Repeat to cook all the remaining gnudi. Spoon the remaining tomato sauce over the gnudi and serve at once.

Spinach Pie Quesadilla – Provided by: Taste Editors  – 35 mins total

I have my superhuman early-morning powers to thank for the simplicity and deliciousness of this Spinach Pie Quesadilla. I also have to give credit to eggs, though. Eggs allow me to feed myself even when there’s not much else in the fridge, and I always keep them handy—then, in the East Village apartment, and now, in the dream-to-reality Brooklyn one. In the two egg recipes that follow this one, I add eggs to pasta and to a mix of vegetables, and as with the quesadilla, they transform these simple staples into a satisfying meal. Of course eggs this good can and should feed more than one, if it’s an hour removed enough from breakfast that friends might actually want to join in.
Recipe from In the Small Kitchen by Cara Eisenpress and Phoebe Lapine/William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins, 2011.

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/4 small onion, finely diced
  • 2 scallions, sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • Pinch each of thyme, oregano, and cayenne
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh spinach
  • 1 small wrap or flour tortilla, 8-inch in diameter
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1 tablespoon plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese, divided

Directions

  • In a small nonstick pan, heat the oil. Add the onion and scallions and cook until soft, 3-4 minutes. Stir in the garlic, cooking a minute or two more until soft. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and the spices.
  • Mix in the spinach and cook until wilted, about 2 minutes. Remove to a bowl and cool slightly. Use a wooden spoon to press out some of the liquid from the cooked spinach and drain.
  • In another small bowl, whisk together the egg white, yogurt, and 1 tablespoon of feta. Add to the cooled spinach and mix until combined.
  • Wipe out the pan, then brush it with about ¼ – ½ teaspoon olive oil or cooking spray.
  • Over low heat, put the wrap or tortilla in the pan and sprinkle the remaining feta over one side of the wrap and get it to soften slightly. Turn the heat to medium and pour the egg-spinach mixture over the same half of the wrap, fold the other half over and cook on one side until the egg begins to firm up, 3-4 minutes. Flip and cook on the other side for 2-3 minutes, then cut into wedges and serve immediately.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Sign Seen Above a Light Switch
“Please conserve energy; Turn off the lights.”
Written below…
“Jokes on you! Energy is always conserved!”

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Daily Stuff 7-19-17 Mary Rose

Hi, folks!

First Minus Tide of the cycle at 3:50 AM of -0.1 feet.

Sunshine is pouring through the solarium roof. I haven’t actually been outside yet, but the weather from the computer report looks just like it’s been for a couple of weeks, now. There’s actually a chance of rain tonight! 30% chance of 0.01 inches of rain… 🙂

Yesterday was longer than we usually do on Tuesdays, since we were up earlier doing chores, and working outside and with our landlady for quite some time. We didn’t get to the shop and get the newsletter out until nearly 4pm, though, and even at 7:30 were only just finishing things like hard-boiling some eggs and baking a loaf of bread. Right about then I finished setting the newsletters up for the week. I still need to fill them in, but I needed to fill in a couple of files, first.

Tempus took off just after 9pm and was done the shopping and bagging papers just a little after 10pm. By then I was working on OCPPG stuff. …and then got sidetracked into uploading some pictures that I took this spring. So if the flowers on the newsletters are slightly out of season, you now know why!

By 1am I was as far on OCPPG stuff as I was able to get…and beginning to wear pretty thin, so I puttered, trying to work out some designs for the promo products for OCPPG.

He picked me up around 3am and we headed into Bayshore. I noticed Venus within minutes and then exclaimed, “The Moon is up!” Sure enough, Hecate’s Brooch was hanging in the sky, a bit south of Venus with Aldebaran between and the Pleiades above. She stayed with us for the whole run. By the very tail end, as it was getting light, but before it washed all the stars out, I’m pretty sure I saw Betelgeuse. (check the pic in the Astro section)

Clouds appeared as we went, hanging over the water of the bay and the river. They got thicker and thinner over the few hours, sometimes obscuring the stars, but making a lovely effect around the gradually rising Moon off and on. I had Tempus stop a couple of times, just so we could admire. Just before sunrise, except for fog bits over the water, the clouds pretty much confined themselves to the Coast Range.

We had a good run, talking over various projects that we’re working on and discussing how to do this and that. The sun wasn’t up yet, when we got home just before 6, and we fell right into bed.

Tempus is upstairs loading some heavy stuff for our landlady. We’re not planning on going into the shop today, since we have enough stuff to move that it’s going to take all day. We have some folks coming who are going to help move the big treadle machine up to the garage. I have some boxes to pack, or rather to go through and re-pack, since there are things that I need in those, and we can shift the boxes to storage later in the week, and there are some things that need to go to the shop from here that can go in one of the totes. Busy!

10304567_10154359815605010_385073048604820210_n

220px-AnthonyRoll-2_Mary_Rose

Today’s Feast is in honor of the sinking of the Mary Rose in 1545 in a naval battle. <<<< She was a ship of the English navy in the time of Henry VIII. A contemporary account says that she turned and a gust of wind hit that heeled her over and she took on enough water through open gunports to sink her! (although there’s some argument about whether it happened that

300px-MaryRose-conservation1

way.) There has been a marvelous project to conserve and restore the ship, <<<<< begun in 1971. In 1982 the ship was raised and extensive work has been done since, including building a museum specifically for the ship, the many artifacts it contained and what is known about the times. There is a museum website with a lot of information here: www.maryrose.org and a Facebook page, “Mary Rose Museum”.

Darlingtonia_californica_ne1

Today’s plant is the cobra lilyDarlingtonia Californica, a carnivorous bog plant, native to California and Oregon. These plants are trippy…. they eat bugs, because they thrive in such awful soil that they need a different way to get the nutrients that most plants get out of the ground! No, they don’t have any magickal uses that I know of. A good article about Darlingtonia: http://coastexplorermagazine.com/features/carnivorous-rare-and-wild-cobra-lilies The wiki article is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darlingtonia_(plant) and one about the wayside in Florence is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darlingtonia_Botanical_Wayside The wayside is worth a drive. There are good walkways just above the ground level so that you don’t hurt the plants. We used to roll Grandma’s wheelchair through there every summer at least once, because she was fascinated, too.

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am.  Hecate’s Brooch – 3-5 days before New Moon – Best time for Releasing Rituals. It’s the last few days before the new moon, the time of Hecate’s Brooch. This is the time that if you’re going to throw something out, or sweep the floors, or take stuff to Good Will, do it! Rid yourself of negativity and work on the letting go process. Release the old, removing unwanted negative energies, addictions, or illness. Do physical and psychic cleansings. Good for wisdom & psychic ability. Goddess Aspect: Crone – Associated God/desses: Callieach, Banshee, Hecate, Baba Yaga, Ereshkigal, Thoth. Phase ends at the Dark on 7/21 at 2:46pm.

Set your alarm to catch the crescent Moon with Venus early in the dawn of Thursday the 20th. Early in Thursday’s dawn, and even a bit earlier, Venus and the waning crescent moon shine together in the east, as shown here. Upper right of them is Aldebaran, and above Aldebaran are the Pleiades. Left of the Moon and Venus is 2nd-magnitude El Nath, Beta Tauri.
Mars is hidden behind the glare of the Sun.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Taurus enters Gemini at 12:31am.
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: White

Harvest 19-20

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
W   19      Low   3:50 AM    -0.1   5:50 AM    Rise  2:26 AM      27
~    19     High  10:04 AM     5.4   8:55 PM     Set  5:10 PM
~    19      Low   3:23 PM     2.2
~    19     High   9:37 PM     8.1

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – You may not recognize it, but you are gifted for something! Whether it be big or small, do what you are gifted to do and you will be happy.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Expository – Write down a joke that you know. Then try to make up one yourself.

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Quotes  

~  If you ask me what I came into this life to do, I will tell you: I came to live out loud. – Emile Zola
~  If you can, help others; if you cannot do that, at least do not harm them. – Dalai Lama
~  If you don’t know where you’re going, you might end up somewhere else. – Toby Keith
~  If you want to be a great leader, you’ve got to surround yourself with great people. – Lee Iacocca

If I say I am having a hagfish moment, steer clear because It means I doubt I have a functional brain and my only possible course of action is to cover myself in copious quantities of disgusting slime. – Martha Sherwood

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Lughnasadh Magick – Prayers and Spells

Prayer for Lughnasadh

Now is the time of the First Harvest,
when the bounties of nature give of themselves so that we may survive.
O God of the ripening fields,
Lord of the Grain,
grant me the understanding of sacrifice as You prepare to deliver Yourself under the sickle of the Goddess and journey to the lands of eternal summer.
O Goddess of the Dark Moon,
teach me the secrets of rebirth as the Sun loses its strength and the nights grow cold. – Scott Cunningham

Lammas Bounty Spell

Lammas is also called Lughnasadh; it is a celebration of plenty and optimism, and of nature’s infinite bounty. It is the time of the first harvests, and it marks midsummer’s joyous and fanciful energy. This spirit is celebrated, too, in Shakespeare’s A Mid-Summer’s Night Dream. To tap into this energy, gather a small bundle of long grass or reeds to braid, and light a white candle. Braid the grass as you speak this verse:

Fairies prancing in the meadow,
Spirits in the corn;
Green Man is flourishing everywhere
On this Midsummer morn.
Grains begin to ripen,
All things bear fruit.
Summer glistens with
possibility,
Blossoms take root.
Fairies whisper secrets,
Powerful blessings to see.
Cycles move and all around,
they share their gifts with me.
Air to fire,
Fire to water,
Water to earth,
Earth to air.
Elements feed spirit,
And the circle glows.
At Lammas, day and night,
We witness Nature’s awesome might.
Growing full
And blessing all,
’Tis Earth’s celebration Before the chill of fall.
Now braiding this grass,
I mark this day
Protect my hearth,
With the abundance of grain.
The blessings of the Goddess come again;
Place the braid above my door.
Hunger be banished now and then.
Blessings be drawn to this place,
Summer’s energy fill this space.
Air, fire, water, earth unite,
And bless us all this day.

Holiday lore:
Lammas is a bittersweet agricultural holiday, mingling joy at the current high season’s harvest with the knowledge that summer is soon at an end. Many cultures have “first fruit” rites on this day—the Celt’s version called Lughnasadh; the Anglo-Saxon version called hlaf-masse. In the Middle Ages, the holiday became set at August 1, taking its current form for the most part, with sheaves of wheat and corn blessed on this day.

By: Abby Willowroot – GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives 2002

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Bumper Snickers – When you’re finally holding all the cards, why does everyone else decide to play chess?

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Daily Stuff 7-18-17 Lu Pan

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne.

Scattered Cumulus Clouds in a Blue Sky

The sky was a big, blue bowl at home. I kept looking up just to enjoy the color. 63F 75% humidity in town, but 55% inland. There’s an odd thing. No clouds from overhead to the west, not even the marine layer in sight, but east of us there are scattered puffs of white and what look like cumulus, maybe even cumulo-nimbus over the Coast Range.

Yesterday was a good day. We got a tremendous amount done. I was working on OCPPG stuff and writing. Tempus was mostly doing cleaning, dishes from the feast and that sort of thing. Later I spent some time working on pincushions. I’m trying to get two displays of them done and ready to go.

In the evening we had class. We’re through Lesson 7, so we’re down to one more class session and we’re done! This has been a very long session.

Today Tempus and I spent some time at home working on various chores. There were screens to be made for the leek buckets, sweeping that needed to be done, laundry and general didn’t-have-time-during-the-week things that needed to be caught up. We spent several hours working outside, helping our landlady sort some things, watering gardens, and generally getting caught up. I spent some time on the hawkweed. I’m over 1750 of the darned things pulled this year!

So, we’re finally at the shop. We have things to put away and more cleaning up to do. I have to rearrange the crystal bottles again. What is it that makes people think that they all have to be top up when you can see what’s in ’em that way? …and they’re alphabetized, so you can find them, or supposed to be. Someone went through and not only put stuff back in all the wrong places, but basically consolidated them all against the back of the box, tops up. <sigh>

A Ken Gagne photo from up the Yachats River on 7/17/15.

071715 Ken Gagne Yachats

220px-LuopanToday’s Feast is in honor of what may be a god named Lu Pan, but is usually referred to as a Feng Shui Wheel, or luopan. I don’t know how these really intersect, but Lu Pan is referred to in modern pagan literature as a Chinese god of carpenters and construction workers and the luopan is an instrument that determines how a house should be built. What is the connection? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lu_pan

flax flwrB 062813Today’s plant is New Zealand FlaxPhormium Tenax. This is a very different plant from common flax or linseed, Linum usitatissimum. It is used mostly as an ornamental in the northern hemisphere, but at one time sustained a lively trade as a fiber. While the two plants are very different, they have similar magickal properties. These days the fiber is mostly used by paper artisans. – Masculine, Mercury, Fire, Hulda – Money spells, add to coins and carry, flax in the shoe averts poverty. For protection while asleep, add to mustard seed, put both opposite cold water. Protection from evil entering, scatter with red pepper by door. Health and healing rituals, sprinkle altar with flaxseed. More here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phormium For the traditional uses of the plant fiberhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_flax

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am.  Waning Crescent Moon –Best time for beginning introspective magicks that are more long term (full year cycle) A good time for beginning knot magicks to “bind up” addictions and illness (finish just before the Tide Change of Dark to New) and “tying up loose ends” God/dess aspects – Demeter weeping for her Daughter, Mabon, Arachne Tyr. Phase ends on 7/18 at 2:46pm. Hecate’s Brooch 3-5 days before New Moon – Best time for Releasing Rituals. It’s the last few days before the new moon, the time of Hecate’s Brooch. This is the time that if you’re going to throw something out, or sweep the floors, or take stuff to Good Will, do it! Rid yourself of negativity and work on the letting go process. Release the old, removing unwanted negative energies, addictions, or illness. Do physical and psychic cleansings. Good for wisdom & psychic ability. Goddess Aspect: Crone – Associated God/desses: Callieach, Banshee, Hecate, Baba Yaga, Ereshkigal, Thoth. Phase ends at the Dark on 7/21 at 2:46pm. 

Set your alarm to catch the crescent Moon with Venus early in the dawn of Thursday the 20th.
Once the night is completely dark, look for the kite-shaped pattern of Bootes extending upper right from Arcturus. It’s two fists long.
The first “star” you’re likely to see coming out after sunset this month is bright Jupiter, in the southwest. Once you find it, examine the sky 30° above it (three fists at arm’s length) for Arcturus, two magnitudes fainter.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Taurus
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Scarlet

Planting 17-18

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

******

Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
Tu  18      Low   2:45 AM     0.6   5:49 AM    Rise  1:46 AM      38
~    18     High   8:46 AM     5.0   8:56 PM     Set  3:58 PM
~    18      Low   2:16 PM     1.9
~    18     High   8:41 PM     7.8

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – A Clean House Is A Sign Of A Misspent Life

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What? – What one thing could you invent that would make your life easier?

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Quotes  

~  I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical….It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government. – Thomas Jefferson to James Madison (Jan. 30, 1787).
~  I is another.  – Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891) French writer
~  If the only tool you have is a hammer, you will treat the whole world as if it were a nail. – Edward de Bono
~  If you are looking for a major breakthrough in your life, you must overcome your limits. – Hanns-Oskar Porr.

The illusion has broken down, the system is in its death throes, if we remain calm, breathing deeply, breathe into our hearts, we can quickly turn chaos into an opening to follow our bliss, our life’s work the path of service we need to follow in order to fulfill our personal calling in the world and gift it to the humanity. We are in the new earth, time for us all to collectively be there. Lift the veil reveal the truth. – Raven Redbone

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Lughnasadh Magick – Crafts

Do a Harvest Chant when serving the corn bread at dinner: Activities taken from “Green Witchcraft” by Anne Moura (Aoumiel)

The Earth Mother grants the grain,
The Horned God goes to his domain.
By giving life into her grain,
The God dies then is born again.

Make a Solar Wheel or Corn Man Wheel

Turn a wire hanger into a circle (standard circle material for wreaths too), keeping the hook to hang it by.

Make a small cardboard disk to glue the corn tips onto. You can decorate it with any design, for example, a pentagram or sun.

Place ears of Indian “squaw” corn (it is smaller than regualr corn and fits easily on a coat hanger) with the tips inthe center of the circle and secure with hot glue to the cardboard disk. Use eight ears for a Solar Wheel, or five ears for a Corn Man. If all the ears of corn meet just right you won’t need the disk, but if they are uneven the disk is helpful.

Wrap a bit of the husks of each ear around the wire on either side of the ear of corn, leaving some to stand out free from the corn.

Let dry overnight and hang on the front door.
Activities taken from “Green Witchcraft” by Anne Moura (Aoumiel)

Make a Corn Wheel

Lammas is the time of the first harvest, and grains, especially corn, are abundant. The eight ears of corn on this wreath represent the eight sabbats. The shucks look like the rays of the sun, a very fitting symbol of the season.
You will need:
a round wire or other hoop on which to build the wreath
8 ears of corn of equal length — dried or fresh
cardboard
a short piece of ribbon or twine (for hanger)
glue
florists wire (optional)

  • Fashion a round hoop wide enough to accommodate the length of two ears of corn.
  • Using ribbon or twine, form a loop to serve as a hanger. Tie or glue this securely to the hoop.
    Position the eight ears of corn inside the circle, paying close attention to the illustration. Be sure to keep the hanger/ribbon positioned at the top of the wreath.
    Tie or wrap the corn shucks around the hoop. (They can be held in place with florists wire, if need be.)
  • Use stray ends of the shucks to cover the hoop completely. (If using dried corn, the shucks should have been soaked in water before starting.)
  • Use florists wire to keep the shucks in place.
    Cut a small, round piece of cardboard. Lay the wreath on the table and position the cardboard circle in the middle of the hoop.
  • Using a glue gun or some other fast drying glue, adhere the tips of the ears to the cardboard circle on the BACK SIDE of the wreath, being careful that the cardboard is not obvious from the front.
  • You may want to cut out the middle of the cardboard circle so it can not easily be seen from the front.
  • Allow the glue to dry and hang.

[Anja’s note – If you go to store this for next year, wrap it well and put it into a critter-proof container!]

******

motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – 

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Daily Stuff 7-17-17 Anastasia

Hi, folks!

Wicca 101 tonight, Lesson 7.

It’s a lovely, sunshiny day! The marine layer is pulled back and there aren’t even any clouds over the coast range. It’s a bit breezier than it’s been. Wind at 13 with 17mph gusts here in town and the evergreens were sighing as I left the apartment. 77% humidity in Bayshore, but even a little bit inland that drops to the 50% range. 61F. Can it get more perfect? …and there’s a 25 % chance of…. well, I’m not going to call it rain, since there’s no chance of accumulation…. aggressive mist…. tonight and tomorrow night.

…and the weekend tourists have headed home, so traffic isn’t as awful. There was some kind of motorcycle rally up the Yachats river so we’ve been listening to too-loud bikes all weekend…. yes, that’s part of the weather report. 🙂

Yesterday was a busy day. We were in early, cooking, and I didn’t get off my feet and stop doing that until about 4:30, so sleeping last night was interesting. Tempus let me sleep in this morning and then brought me back to the shop at about 1:30….

One of the big things yesterday was to get the pickled mushrooms started. That took some doing. This is another food experiment. I’m going to be trying some pickled onions next if I can get some boiling onions. I’m going to have Tempus try the Farmer’s Market. I love cooking and these experiments are a *lot* of fun for me!

We had a good feast: beef cooked in wine with mushrooms and a gravy to go with it from the drippings (the beef was from a score of 40 pounds of Angus beef for less than the price of regular, that we brought home and cut up) oat/wheat bread, pease/barley pottage, vegetables cooked in beef broth, fried cheese, stuffed mushrooms and all the trimmings. We ate like (medieval) kings! 🙂 …and then sat there, stuffed, staring at each other….. 🙂 and mostly everyone headed home fairly soon, although Tempus and I stayed at the shop, cleaning up and doing the other chores that were neglected during the cooking.

We didn’t head  home until past 11 and fell into bed.

Today I was curled up in bed sewing for awhile after I contacted Tempus to tell him I was up. He was dealing with phone and lots of customers in and out for awhile, but when that slack off he put a sign in the window and came back for me.

We’re cleaning up from the feast today…well, right now we’re having coffee and cheese toast…. but we’re sorting things out. I need to do some work on herbs, so I want the back table clear again, and I need to make some sandwich spread. We have an interesting corn-added wheat bread loaf that we’re finishing up and are going to try a rye-added loaf, next. …and then possibly one with cracked wheat.

Wicca 101 tonight again. We’re getting close to being finished with this, finally!

einstein thinking wise

Today is the anniversary of the date of the deaths of the Russian Royal Anasig-1-family (the Romanovs) during the Bolshevik Revolution. Anastasia is the best known of the family at this point as the details have dropped from memory during the almost-century since the murders. Anastasia was the next-to-youngest in the family and was rumored to have survived the massacre. Alas, that has been proved to not be the case. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duchess_Anastasia_Nikolaevna_of_Russia  There is a possibility that her older sister Maria survived (and had been rumored to be Anastasia), although it hasn’t been proved. We’ll probably never know for certain.

plant pic Rhododendron_occidentale_StrybingToday’s Plant is the Western AzaleaRhododendron Occidentale. I talked a while back about the azaleas being a subset of the rhodys. This is the main one that grows around here. It’s hard to tell from the shape and size of the plant that it’s an azalea, or even from the flowers, although the branches are thinner and the leaves shorter and rounder than those of rhododendrons. It least it’s hard for those of us who are familiar with the showy garden hybrids, which tend to be small and compact. The other West Coast azalea is Rhododendron Albiflorum, and there’s not a whacking lot of info floating around about that one. The wiki is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_occidentale The Chinese call azaleas “thinking of home bush”. Magickal uses for azalea are to encourage light spirits, happiness and gaiety.

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am.  Waning Crescent Moon –Best time for beginning introspective magicks that are more long term (full year cycle) A good time for beginning knot magicks to “bind up” addictions and illness (finish just before the Tide Change of Dark to New) and “tying up loose ends” God/dess aspects – Demeter weeping for her Daughter, Mabon, Arachne Tyr. Phase ends on 7/18 at 2:46pm.

Venus starts the week above Aldebaran and ends the week closer to Aldebaran’s upper left.
If you have a dark enough sky, the Milky Way forms a magnificent arch very high across the whole eastern sky after nightfall is complete. It runs all the way from below Cassiopeia in the north-northeast, up and across Cygnus and the Summer Triangle high in the east below bright Vega, and down past the spout of the Sagittarius Teapot in the south.
Venus (magnitude –4.1) shines brightly in the east before and during dawn. Aldebaran, much fainter at magnitude +0.9, moves away from Venus’s right toward the upper right this week.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Taurus at
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Lavendar

Planting 17-18

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

******

Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

******

Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
M   17      Low   1:36 AM     1.2   5:48 AM    Rise  1:11 AM      50
~    17     High   7:23 AM     5.2   8:56 PM     Set  2:47 PM
~    17      Low   1:12 PM     1.4
~    17     High   7:46 PM     7.4

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – You are the only person you need to please.

******

Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Wiki – If you had to move to another state, which one would you choose?

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Quotes  

~  Courage to start and willingness to keep everlasting at it are the requisites for success. – Alonzo Newton Benn
~  Don’t torture yourself, Gomez. That’s my job. – Morticia
~  Every person has a warrior inside. It is a personal decision as to whether you utilize this archetype or not. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat. – Winston Churchill

Balmily, balmily, summer wind,
Sigh through the mountain passes;
Over the sleep of the beautiful deep
Over the woods green masses
Ripple the grain of valley and plain,
And the reeds and the river grasses. – Ina Donna Coolbrith (1841–1928)

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Lughnasadh Magick –

Crone’s Corner – Celebrating Lughnasadh, or Lammas  

Lughnassadh (pronounced “LOO-nahs-ah”) or Lammas, is one of the Greater Wiccan Sabbats and is usually celebrated on August 1st or 2nd, although occasionally on July 31st. The Celtic festival held in honor of the Sun God Lugh (pronounced “Loo”) is traditionally held on August 7th. Some Pagans celebrate this holiday on the first Full Moon in Leo. Other names for this Sabbat include the First Harvest Festival, the Sabbat of First Fruits, August Eve, Lammastide, Harvest Home, Ceresalia (Ancient Roman in honor of the Grain Goddess Ceres), Feast of Bread, Sabbat of First Fruits, Festival of Green Corn (Native American), Feast of Cardenas, Cornucopia (Strega), Thingtide and Elembiuos. Lughnassadh is named for the Irish Sun God Lugh (pronounced Loo), and variant spellings for the holiday are Lughnasadh, Lughnasad, Lughnassad, Lughnasa or Lunasa. The most commonly used name for this Sabbat is Lammas, an Anglo-Saxon word meaning “loaf-mass”.

The Lughnassadh Sabbat is a time to celebrate the first of three harvest celebrations in the Craft. It marks the middle of Summer represents the start of the harvest cycle and relies on the early crops of ripening grain, and also any fruits and vegetables that are ready to be harvested. It is therefore greatly associated with bread as grain is one of the first crops to be harvested. Wiccans give thanks and honor to all Gods and Goddesses of the Harvest, as well as those who represent Death and Resurrection.

This is a time when the God mysteriously begins to weaken as the Sun rises farther in the South, each day grows shorter and the nights grow longer. The Goddess watches in sorrow as She realizes that the God is dying, and yet lives on inside Her as Her child. It is in the Celtic tradition that the Goddess, in her guise as the Queen of Abundance, is honored as the new mother who has given birth to the bounty; and the God is honored as the God of Prosperity.

Symbols to represent the Lammas Sabbat include corn, all grains, corn dollies, sun wheels, special loaves of bread, wheat, harvesting (threshing) tools and the Full Moon. Altar decorations might include corn dollies and/or kirn babies (corn cob dolls) to symbolize the Mother Goddess of the Harvest. Other appropriate decorations include Summer flowers and grains. You might also wish to have a loaf of whole cracked wheat or multigrain bread upon the altar.

Deities associated with Lughnassadh are all Grain and Agriculture Deities, Sun Gods, Mother Goddesses and Father Gods. Particular emphasis is placed on Lugh, Demeter, Ceres, the Corn Mother and John Barleycorn (the personification of malt liquor). Key actions associated with Lammas are receiving and harvesting, honoring the Parent Deities, honoring the Sun Gods and Goddesses, as well as celebration of the First Harvest.

It is considered a time of Thanksgiving and the first of three Pagan Harvest Festivals, when the plants of Spring wither and drop their fruits or seeds for our use as well as to ensure future crops. Also, first grains and fruits of the Earth are cut and stored for the dark Winter months.

Activities appropriate for this time of the year are the baking of bread and wheat weaving – such as the making of Corn Dollies, or other God & Goddess symbols. Sand candles can be made to honor the Goddess and God of the sea. You may want to string Indian corn on black thread to make a necklace, and bake corn bread sticks shaped like little ears of corn for your Sabbat cakes. The Corn Dolly may be used both as a fertility amulet and as an altar centerpiece. Some bake bread in the form of a God-figure or a Sun Wheel .

It is customary to consume bread or something from the First Harvest during the Lughnassadh Ritual. Other actions include the gathering of first fruits and the study of Astrology. Some Pagans symbolically throw pieces of bread into a fire during the Lammas ritual.

The celebration of Lammas is a pause to relax and open yourself to the change of the Season so that you may be one with its energies and accomplish what is intended. Visits to fields, orchards, lakes and wells are also traditional. It is considered taboo not to share your food with others

Traditional Pagan Foods for the Lughnassadh Festival include homemade breads (wheat, oat and especially cornbread), corn, potatoes, berry pies, barley cakes, nuts, wild berries, apples, rice, roasted lamb, acorns, crab apples, summer squash, turnips, oats, all grains and all First Harvest foods. Traditional drinks are elderberry wine, ale and meadowsweet tea.

It is also appropriate to plant the seeds from the fruit consumed in ritual. If the seeds sprout, grow the plant with love and as a symbol of your connection to the Divine. A cake is sometimes baked, and cider is used in place of wine.

As Summer passes, Wiccans remember its warmth and bounty in the food we eat. Every meal is an act of attunement with Nature From Miss Daney’s Folklore, Magic and Superstitions

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