Daily Stuff 6-28-12 Fixed the pictures

Hi, folks!

The burring wings of a hummingbird are just visible behind the bird-feeder. The sun is going in and out of clouds. It’s in the upper 50’s.

I settled in to work on the computer yesterday morning when Tempus called up from the shop and said, “Did you remember Patra is here?” Oops….
Patra came up to the house and we went through what all she had and *wow*, do we have a marvelous new stock of feathers and feather art! We’ve got cards on the front counter (and those are going for $1 each, a real steal!!!!) a whole basket of single feathers, plus a hanging bag organizer to choose from. We have a set of clips for hair and other things, several real feather smudge fans, feather eyelashes (wow!), some of her prints and a few feather originals, most of which I’m going to try to place with local galleries. Now I can make more of the feather earrings that everyone loved for the Yule season in 2010. I was using her feathers, for those, as well. ..and we had a good chat, too!
She and Tempus got things counted and partially placed. I’m going to have to go on with that today.

I started the beef as soon as I got in from that, on a slow simmer, then when it was done, pulled it out to cool and stuck it into the fridge, adding beans and rice to the broth.
I took the parsnips, turnips, carrots & rutabagas out to the garden to peel ‘em, so that I could sit and enjoy the sunshine, then harvested the newly opened buttercups and calendula. The sky was a perfect summer blue. The sunshine was almost hot. The air was clean and it was quiet except for a lawnmower purring in the distance for a while, which was replaced by the sound of a string trimmer.
I also used our string trimmer a lot, getting some of the messed cut out of the flower beds. I still need to truly weed out some of that, but I’m starting to think about black plastic to just kill it off, since I can’t seem to get ahead of it.
Rose petals got harvested. The tiny pink rose that the rugosa keeps trying to eat is in full bloom and the white rose in the retaining wall that dries pink needed to be harvested, too. Those are going into the dryer today and I’ll have to grab the pink teas and the red and white roses from the garage wall and out front as we’re heading out.
There’s a lot of calendula, too.

The laundry was finally dry, all but the bolt of blue fabric, so that got all readied to go to the shop or put away where it belongs. Later I started the other bolt of blue fabric and set up several loads of “special” laundry…things that might run or needed bleached or something. I ended up running 6 loads of various “stuff”, but the two blue fabrics still need to be “bolted”.
After that I hung my pillows outside on the line in the sun. I don’t know how real it is, but Babicka always insisted on sun-bleaching pillows in mid-summer. She said it killed “allergics” and brought in summer’s good luck.
What she was referring to was that during the time of Jan Kupalo (June 19 to Perun’s Day on July 7) is the time of collecting “sun” from outdoors to store all winter. She would even take jars of water outside to stand in the sun and then put them up in the canning cupboard, claiming that it kept things warm enough to not freeze, even if you put things out in the woodshed. She also insisted on making sun tea, that it was better for you than boiling it on the stove and said that foods “grown in the sun” were better for you, as well.
We always did a lot of laundry this time of year and all the ticks and covers from pillows and featherbeds got washed and bleached and hung to dry.
This was always the time of year when the cherries were fully ripe and I spent years (sometimes all in one week!) climbing the trees and picking them. She would make cherry lemonade for us, her special recipe, and the cherry pies were awesome….
There’s a song out there with a line, “Taste a little of the summer, Grandma put it all in a jar.” That was my Babicka….

Then I went in to sit and watched a huge green hummingbird working on the syrup feeder for a while.

I was on Facebook for a while yesterday afternoon and told one of my kids that I was “doing laps”. Washer to stove to garden to computer…. Around and around….

One of the anomalies in that was that I put the houseplants into the shower and turned it to cold and let them get rained on for a while. It washes off the dust and they needed a good soaking.

Eventually, I got the cooled beef and the vegetables cut up and boxed and when Tempus got home, the barley got simmered in the broth. I finally was boxing all that up after midnight. We’re going to have some of this soup ourselves, but the main thing was to get something ready for the youngsters on Sunday.
I love a soup that cooks all day. This one has a nice creamy texture from the rice. The vegetables have cooked way down and we’ll add corn to it and maybe some other mixed veg as we’re heating it up: stuff that doesn’t really need to be cooked, just thawed and warmed up.
I also sautéed some mushrooms and garlic to add to the chicken in mushroom gravy that we had yesterday and will have tonight.
I made pizza for last night’s dinner with polish sausage, cheddar, mozzarella and blue cheese. That will also be today’s lunch.
I still have a lemon cilantro chicken dish to make, but I’m going to have to wait. We’re heading for the shop in just a few minutes.

Tempus was busy yesterday, what with the feathers and with customers.

Tempus started his newspaper route early this morning. I heard his awful cell phone alarm go off and he was out the door in minutes after tucking the covers over me. He hasn’t said how it went.

I’m having coffee at the moment.

The shop opens at 10am. Summer hours, 10am-7pm, Wednesday through Monday. If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open!

Love & Light,

Anja

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Today

The Moon Waxing Gibbous. Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is  for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams.
Waxing Gibbous Moon – From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Phase ends at 11:52pm on Sunday.

Saturn and Spica are now to the right of the waxing gibbous Moon. Jupiter and Venus are creeping a little higher every morning

Celtic Tree Month of Duir  Oak Jun 10Jul 7
Goddess Month of Rosea runs from 6/13 – 7/10
Runic New Year’s Eve, final day of the runic year June 28
Runic New Year and half-month of Feoh, 6/29-7/13 Important in the runic year cycle, today marks beginning of the first rune, Feoh, sacred to Frey and Freya (Freyja), the lord and lady often worshipped in modern Wicca. It is the half-month of wealth and success. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Scorpio
Chiron, Neptune, Juno, Pluto Retrograde
Color: Coral

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©2012 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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www.wunderground.com
Jun. 28, 2012, Rise, Set
Actual Time, 5:34 AM PDT, 9:04 PM PDT
Civil Twilight, 4:57 AM PDT, 9:41 PM PDT
Nautical Twilight, 4:09 AM PDT, 10:29 PM PDT
Astronomical Twilight, 3:07 AM PDT, 11:31 PM PDT

Moon, 3:39 PM PDT, 1:18 AM PDT
Length Of Visible Light, 16h 43m
Length of Day, 15h 30m
Tomorrow will be 0m 36s shorter.
Waxing Gibbous, 67% of the Moon is Illuminated

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Tides for Alsea Bay

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon

/Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                    Visible

Th  28      Low   2:20 AM     0.8   5:34 AM     Set  1:19 AM      58

28     High   8:14 AM     4.9   9:05 PM    Rise  3:40 PM

28      Low   1:44 PM     1.8

28     High   8:15 PM     7.8

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Make this an acceptable day!

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Journal Prompt – What is? – What is the worst thing parents can do to their children?

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Quotes

Any technical problem can be overcome given enough time and money. – Lerman’s Law of Technology, Corollary: You are never given enough time or money.
Anyone can carry his burden, however hard, until nightfall. Anyone can do his work, however hard, for one day. Anyone can live sweetly, patiently, lovingly, purely, till the sun goes down. And this is all life really means. – Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Scottish novelist, poet
As usual, there is a great woman behind every idiot. – John Lennon (1940-1980) English singer, songwriter
Be yourself. An original is always worth more than a copy. – Author Unknown

Poem lyrics of The Charge Of The Light Brigade by Alfred Lord Tennyson.

Half a league, half a league,
Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
“Forward the Light Brigade!
Charge for the guns!” he said.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

“Forward, the Light Brigade!”
Was there a man dismay’d?
Not tho’ the soldier knew
Some one had blunder’d.
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volley’d and thunder’d;
Storm’d at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of hell
Rode the six hundred.

Flash’d all their sabres bare,
Flash’d as they turn’d in air
Sabring the gunners there,
Charging an army, while
All the world wonder’d.
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right thro’ the line they broke;
Cossack and Russian
Reel’d from the sabre-stroke
Shatter’d and sunder’d.
Then they rode back, but not,
Not the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volley’d and thunder’d;
Storm’d at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell,
They that had fought so well
Came thro’ the jaws of Death,
Back from the mouth of hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.

When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wonder’d.
Honor the charge they made!
Honor the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred!

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Magick (Gots the pictures!)

Pleiades (star cluster) – From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades_%28star_cluster%29#The_Pleiades_in_folklore

The Pleiades are an open cluster dominated by hot blue stars surrounded by reflection nebulosity

A shorter exposure shows less nebulosity.

The Pleiades (also known as M45 or the Seven Sisters) is the name of an open cluster in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest to the Earth of all open clusters, probably the best known and certainly the most striking to the naked eye.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue stars, which have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud that the stars are currently passing through. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which time it will have dispersed due to gravitational interactions with the spiral arms of the galaxy and giant molecular clouds.

Accurate knowledge of the distance to the cluster is very important in astronomy as it is a crucial first step on the cosmic distance ladder, the calibration of the distance scale of the whole universe. The cluster is now known to lie at a distance of about 135 parsecs (440 light years).

The Pleiades in folklore

The Subaru car company uses the Pleiades as their logo.

The Pleiades’ high visibility in the night sky has guaranteed it a special place in many cultures, both ancient and modern. In Greek mythology, they represented the Seven Sisters, while to the Vikings, they were Freyja‘s hens, and their name in many old European languages compares them to a hen with chicks.

To the Bronze Age people of Europe, such as the Celts (and probably considerably earlier), the Pleiades were associated with mourning and with funerals, since at that time in history, on the cross-quarter day between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice (see Samhain, also Halloween or All Souls Day), which was a festival devoted to the remembrance of the dead, the cluster rose in the eastern sky as the sun’s light faded in the evening. It was from this acronychal rising that the Pleiades became associated with tears and mourning. As a result of precession over the centuries, the Pleiades no longer marked the festival, but the association has nevertheless persisted, and accounts for the significance of the Pleiades astrologically.

A bronze disk, 1600 BC, from Nebra, Germany, is the one of the oldest known representations of the cosmos. The Pleiades are top right. See Nebra sky disk

The ancient Aztecs of Mexico and Central America based their calendar upon the Pleiades. Their calendric year began when priests first remarked the asterism rising heliacally in the east, immediately before the sun’s dawn light obliterated the view of the stars.

Heliacal risings very often mark important calendar points for ancient peoples.[11] The heliacal rising of the Pleiades (around June) also begins the new year for the Māori of New Zealand, who call the Pleiades Matariki.

Indigenous Australians

Depending on the tribe or clan, some Indigenous Australian peoples believed the Pleiades were a woman who had been nearly raped by Kidili, the man in the moon.

Another version, often painted by Gabriella Possum Nungurayyi as this is her dreaming (or creation story), daughter of the late Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri from the Central desert art movement of Papunya, depicts the story of seven Napaltjarri sister,s being chased by a man named Jilbi Tjakamarra. He would practice love magic to seduce the sisters but they had no intention of being with him and ran away. They sat down at Uluru to search for honey ants but when they saw Jilbi, they went to Kurlunyalimpa and with the spirits of Uluru, transformed into stars. Jilbi transforms himself into what is commonly known as the Morning Star in Orion’s belt, thus continuing to chase the seven sisters across the sky. (Source: Aboriginal Fine Art Gallery)

Native Americans

The Sioux of North America had a legend that linked the origin of the Pleiades to Devils Tower. It was common among the indigenous peoples of the Americas to measure keenness of vision by the number of stars the viewer could see in the Pleiades, a practice which was also used in historical Europe, especially in Greece.

In Japan, the Pleiades are known as Subaru, a tortoise, and have given their name to the car manufacturer. In Chinese constellations, they are 昴 mao, the hairy head of the white tiger of the West, while the name of the Hindu God Kartikeya means him of the Pleiades.

In Western astrology they represent coping with sorrow [12] and were considered a single one of the medieval fixed stars. As such, they are associated with quartz and fennel. In Indian astrology the Pleiades were known as the asterism (nakshatra) Krittika (which in Sanskrit is translated as “the cutters.”)[13] The Pleiades are called the star of fire, and their ruling deity is the Vedic god Agni, the god of the sacred fire. It is one of the most prominent of the nakshatras, and is associated with anger and stubbornness.

The word has acquired a meaning of “multitude”, inspiring the name of the French literary movement La Pléiade and an earlier group of Alexandrian poets, the Alexandrian Pleiad.

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Silliness – GCF: Diagnosis
The psychology instructor had just finished a lecture on mental health and was giving an oral test.

Speaking specifically about manic depression, she asked, “How would you diagnose a patient who walks back and forth screaming at the top of his lungs one minute, then sits in a chair weeping uncontrollably the next?”

A young man in the rear raised his hand and answered, “A basketball coach?”

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