Daily Stuff 3-26-15 Kuhio

Hi, folks!

032515 Ball 04No Sewing Time tonight. Anja’s still sick.

weather sun faceIt’s 52, bright sunshine and only the occasional bit of breeze to stir things

Yesterday was long for me, and quiet. Hatch got back with Tempus around suppertime, but until then I was working on my ball and pictures and music and totally forgot about newsletter stuff until evening! …and by then I was so darned tired…. Well, I’m home today, so I can remedy that at least.

motif plant flower dandelion herbTempus had an interesting day. He ended 032515 Ball 13up blowing a water hose on his car, so he and our friend ended up hanging out in his room all day. He needed the rest. I’m really worried that he’s going to come down with something the way I have.

plant motif flower chamomile herbThe problem is that he’s going to have to go up there and fix it before he can open the shop, because I’m still coughing too hard to be there. So…. I don’t know what time we’ll actually open. Right now he’s waiting for Hatch to wake up and going over the repair manual for the car. He’s going to put a sign in the window and go on to get the parts that he needs. He’ll let me know when he finally gets the shop open and then I’ll also post online.

A Ken Gagne picture from March 1st. “Yachats Covered Bridge – This was the Yachats River with steam coming off of it as it was only 29 degrees.” 030115 Yachats Covered Bridge this was the Yachats River with steam coming off of it as it was only 29 degrees Ken Gagne

strawberry 030913Today’s Plant is the Strawberry. We have two wild varieties out here, Wood’s Strawberry, Fragaria vesca, the Coastal Strawberry, Fragaria chiloensis, and of course the Garden Strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa, which is a hybrid. The leaves of vesca have been used to make a tea to help with diarrhea and the whole plant is used as an anti-depressant, from flowers to leaves to fruit. – Feminine, Venus, Water, Freya (and many other deities) – Carry the leaves for luck, use them in love spells and sachets, sleep on them to dream of your love. Pregnant women should carry a sachet of the leaves during the last few months of pregnancy to ease labor. The berries themselves are simply an aphrodisiac, often combined with chocolate for this purpose. Yum! Wood’s Strawberry here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragaria_vesca and Coastal Strawberry here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragaria_chiloensis  Garden Strawberry here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_strawberry

feast 0326 Seal_of_the_State_of_Hawaii.svgToday is one of only two “royalty” days in the US. Prince Kuhio was the heir to the throne of Hawaii and became the territorial delegate to Congress, authoring the first Statehood bill. On this day there is a lei draping of his statue, music, parades, and other kinds of fun, including craft shows.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Kuhio_Day

wheel of the yearThe shop opens at 11am! Spring hours are 11am-6pm Thursday through Monday, although they’re drifting longer into the evening as sunset does. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Waxing Crescent MoonWaxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 4/4 at 5:06am. Waxing Crescent phase – Keywords for the Crescent phase are: expansion, growth, struggle, opportunity. It is the time in a cycle that you gather the wisdom learned in the new phase and communicate your intention to move forward. Light a candle. Write or read an affirmation. LISTEN & ABSORB. Commit to your goal. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, energy and enthusiasm – Associated God/dess: Artemis & Apollo, Mayet/Djehuti, Freya/Frey. Phase ends at the Quarter on 3/27 at 12:43am. 

Astro Constellation Orion Sirius BetelgeuseThe almost-first-quarter Moon shines above Orion and below Gemini this evening. If you have a dark enough sky (or binoculars), you can see that the Moon is in or near Orion’s dim, upraised club.
Astro uranusUranus and Astro neptuneNeptune are hidden behind the glare of the Sun.

Goddess Month of Columbina runs from 3/20 – 4/17
Celtic Tree Month of Fearn/Alder, Mar 18 – Apr 14
Rune Runic Month 06 Berkana BeorcRunic half-month of Berkana/ Beorc, 3/14-29 Half-month ruled by the goddess of the birch tree; a time of purification for rebirth and new beginnings. Runic half-month of Ehwaz, 3/30-4/13 – Ehwaz, the horse; time of partnership between humans and Nature, as between rider and horse. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, p. 55  

Sun in AriesSun in Aries
Moon in GeminiMoon in Gemini enters Cancer at 12:45pm
Saturn (8/2/15), Jupiter (4/8/15) Retrograde
Color: Green

©2015 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright.

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fearn alder Alnus-viridis-leavesCeltic Tree Month of Fearn/Alder, Mar 18 – Apr 14. Fern (FAIR-n) Alder – The common alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertner) is common along lowland rivers, where it grows with aspens, poplars, and willows. Like willows, alders sprout from stumps. This allows them to regenerate after heavy flooding. In protect sites they may grow to 20 m (65 feet) tall. Their leaves are more blunt-tipped than most North American alders, which look more like the grey alder (A. incana (L.) Moench). This species is more common in the mountains of Europe, and is not restricted to moist soils. Like ashes, European alders are not widely cultivated in North American (they are often sold as black alders), but several native species are. Alder wood is said to resist rotting when it is wet, and was the wood of choice for pilings in many regions. Alders are members of the Birch family (Betulaceae).
Plant Tree Celtic Month FearnAlderFearn – Alder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: January
Color: Crimson
Class: Cheiftain
Letter: F, V
Meaning: Help in making choices; spiritual guidance and protection.
fearn silver fir ailim Abies_albaOgam letter correspondences to study this month – Ailim – Silver Fir
Month: None
Color: Light Blue
Class: Shrub
Letter: A
Meaning: Learning from past mistakes; Take care in choices.

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Waves tide

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Tides for Alsea Bay
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~           /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                    Visible
Th  26     High   5:31 AM     7.5   7:08 AM     Set  1:53 AM      35
~    26      Low  12:31 PM     0.5   7:36 PM    Rise 11:43 AM
~    26     High   7:03 PM     6.0

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Meditation – Roll down a hill with your (or any) child. Breathe deep. What does your inner child feel like?

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Friends – What would you do if only one hot dog is left and neither you nor your friend have had one?

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Quotes 

~  April is the cruellest month. – Thomas Stearnes Eliot (1888-1965) US writer
~  He is a wise man who does not grieve for the things which he has not, but rejoices for those which he has. – Epictetus
~  A writer must teach himself that the basest of all things is to be afraid. – William Faulkner (1897-1962) US writer
~  Men often become what they believe themselves to be. If I believe I cannot do something, it makes me incapable of doing it. But when I believe I can, then I acquire the ability to do it even if I didn’t have it in the beginning. – Mahatma Gandhi

To bring about a society that is not repetitive, nor static, a society that is constantly alive, it is imperative that there should be a revolution in the psychological structure of the individual, for without inward, psychological revolution, mere transformation of the outer has very little significance. – J. Krishnamurti

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Pentacle of ElementsMagick – Thirteen Books Every Wiccan Should Read by Patti Wigington, About.com Guide

Now that you’ve decided you want to learn about Wicca, what should you read? After all, there are literally thousands of books on the subject — some good, others not so much. This list features the thirteen books that every Wiccan should have on their shelves. A few are historical, a few more focus on actual Wiccan practice, but they’re all worth reading more than once.

Adler, Margot: Drawing Down the Moon

If you want to learn about birds, you get a field guide about birds. If you want to learn about mushrooms, you get a field guide to mushrooms. Drawing Down the Moon is a field guide to Pagans. Rather than offering up a book of spells and recipes, Margot Adler presents an academic work that evaluates modern Pagan religions – including Wicca – and the people who practice them. The work is based on a survey the author took over two decades ago, but the information within is still a worthy read. Drawing Down the Moon makes no apologies for the fact that not all Wiccans are full of white light and fluff, but instead tells it like it is. Adler’s style is entertaining and informative, and it’s a bit like reading a really well-done thesis paper.

Buckland, Raymond: Complete Book of Witchcraft

Image (c) Patti Wigington 2007

Raymond Buckland is one of Wicca’s most prolific writers, and his work Complete Book of Witchcraft continues to remain popular two decades after it was first published – and for good reason. Although this book represents a more eclectic flavor of Wicca rather than a particular tradition, it’s presented in a workbook-like format that allows new seekers to work through the exercises at their own pace, learning as they go. For more seasoned readers, there’s a lot of useful information as far as rituals, tools, and magic itself. This book is a classic, and well worth picking up.

Cunningham, Scott: Wicca – A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner

The late Scott Cunningham wrote a number of books before his untimely death, but Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner remains one of the best known and most useful. Although the tradition of witchcraft in this book is more Cunningham’s eclectic path than any other tradition, it’s full of information on how to get started in your practice of Wicca and magic. He goes into depth about tools, how and why they are used, ethics, and the concept of god and goddess. If you’re interested in learning and practicing as an individual, and not necessarily jumping into a coven right off the bat, this book is a valuable resource.

Curott, Phyllis: Witch Crafting

Phyllis Curott is one of those people who makes me glad to be Pagan — because she’s really normal. An attorney who has spent her life working on First Amendment issues, Curott has managed to put together a really useful book. Witch Crafting is not a collection of spells, rituals or prayers. It’s a hard and fast look at magical ethics, the polarity of male and female in the divine, finding the god and goddess in your everyday life, and the pros and cons of coven life vs. solitary paths. Curott also offers up a very interesting take on the Rule of Three. Whether you’re a new student of Wicca, or a veteran, Witch Crafting is worth reading more than once.

Eilers, Dana: Pagans and the Law – Understand Your Rights

Image © Dana D. Eilers

Dana D. Eilers spent many years facilitating an event called Conversations With Pagans, and from that she wrote a book entitled The Practical Pagan. She then drew on her experience as an attorney to write Pagans and the Law: Understand Your Rights. This book goes into depth about precedents in religious discrimination lawsuits, how to protect yourself if you may be a victim of workplace harassment, and how to document everything if your spirituality is leading someone to treat you unfairly. Eilers is an outspoken woman who has a lot of great advice worth listening to.

Farrar, Janet & Stewart: The Witches’ Bible

[p]The first section of this book is Eight Sabbats for Witches. It goes into depth on Sabbat rites, and the meanings behind the holidays are expanded on. While the ceremonies in The Witches’ Bible are the Farrars’ own, there’s a heavy influence of the Gardnerian tradition, as well as Celtic folklore and some other European history. The second half of the book is in fact another book, The Witches Way, which looks at the beliefs, ethics, and practice of modern witchcraft. Despite the fact that the authors are a bit conservative by today’s standards, this book is an excellent look at the transitioning concept of what exactly it is that makes someone a witch.

Gardner, Gerald: Witchcraft Today

Image courtesy of BK Tigner

Gerald Gardner is the founder of modern Wicca as we know it, and of course of the Gardnerian tradition. His book Witchcraft Today is a worthy read, however, for seekers on any Pagan path. He discusses paganism in Europe, as well as the so-called “witch cult”, and goes on to demonstrate how many of history’s notable names are connected, one way or another, to what we know today as witchcraft. Although some of the statements in Witchcraft Today should be taken with a grain of salt — after all, Gardner was a folklorist and that shines through in his writing — it’s still one of the foundations that contemporary Wicca is based on. For its historical value, few things beat this book.

Hutton, Ronald: Triumph of the Moon

Triumph of the Moon is a book about Pagans by a non-Pagan, and Hutton, a highly respected professor, does an excellent job. This book looks at the emergence of contemporary Pagan religions, and how they not only evolved from the Pagan societies of the past, but also owe heavily to 19th-century poets and scholars. In fact, Hutton points out that a good deal of what we consider “ancient” Pagan practice can be attributed to the novelists and romantics of the late Edwardian and early Victorian era. Despite his status as a scholar, Hutton’s breezy wit makes this a refreshing read, and you’ll learn far more than you ever expected to about today’s Pagan religions.

Morrison, Dorothy: The Craft – A Witch’s Book of Shadows

Image © Dorothy Morrison

Dorothy Morrison is one of those writers who doesn’t hold back, and while her book The Craft is aimed at beginners, she manages to create a work that can be useful for anyone. Morrison includes exercises and rituals which are not only practical, but teaching tools as well. Despite its focus on the lighter side of witchcraft, it’s a good starting point for anyone trying to learn about Wicca, and how to create your own rituals and workings. Morrison also has written a number of other books, including a companion work to this one.

Russell, Jeffrey: A History of Witchcraft

Historian Jeffrey Russell presents an analysis of witchcraft in an historical context, from the early days of Medieval Europe, through the witch craze of the Renaissance, and up into modern times. Russell doesn’t bother trying to fluff up the history to make it more palatable to today’s Wiccans, and takes a look at three different kinds of witchcraft — sorcery, diabolical witchcraft, and modern witchcraft. A noted religious historian, Russell manages to make an entertaining yet informative read, as well as accepting that witchcraft in and of itself can in fact be a religion.

Now that you’ve decided you want to learn about Wicca, what should you read? After all, there are literally thousands of books on the subject — some good, others not so much. This list features the thirteen books that every Wiccan should have on their shelves. A few are historical, a few more focus on actual Wiccan practice, but they’re all worth reading more than once.

Serith, Ceisiwr: A Book of Pagan Prayer

There is nothing else on the market like Ceisiwr Serith’s A Book of Pagan Prayer. Despite the fact that some view prayer as a Christian concept, many Pagans do pray. This unique book features hundreds of prayers written to meet the needs of Pagans from a wide range of traditions. There are prayers for life events, such as handfastings, births, and deaths; for times of the year such as the harvest and midsummer, as well as petitions and litanies offered to different gods. Serith also covers the theories behind prayer — how and why we do it, as well as tips on creating your own, personal prayers. Chances are that once you’ve started using this book, it will stay near your altar for years to come.

Starhawk: The Spiral Dance

While The Spiral Dance is one of the best-known books on Wicca, it’s also one of the most spiritually profound. Written by noted activist Starhawk, The Spiral Dance leads us on a journey through the spirituality of feminine consciousness. Sections on raising the cone of power, trance magic, and magical symbolism make it worth reading. Bear in mind that the original edition of this book was published twenty years ago, and Starhawk herself has said she’s reconsidered some of the things she said the first time around — particularly in reference to the polarity of the male/female. Despite some of the eco-feminist complaints about Starhawk, this book is powerful because it’s one of the first of its kind, portraying Woman as Goddess.

Valiente, Doreen: Witchcraft for Tomorrow

If Gerald Gardner is the great-grandfather of modern Wicca, Doreen Valiente is the wise granny who offers wisdom and counsel. A contemporary of Gardner’s, she is credited with the beautiful, evocative Charge of the Goddess, and may well have been responsible for much of Gardner’s original Book of Shadows. Valiente spends a good amount of the book discussing the historical contexts of a number of rituals and practices in use today, but also takes care to acknowledge that practices and beliefs change even if the intent remains constant, and she points out ancient sources that may or may not be the root of contemporary ideals. Though it helps to have some knowledge of British Traditional Wicca beforehand, this book is a must-read for anyone.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Hitch-hiking

A guy was hitch-hiking on a very dark and stormy night. The night was getting on and no cars went by. Suddenly he saw a car roll slowly toward him and stop.

Without thinking about it, the guy jumped into the back seat and closed the door when he suddenly realized there was nobody behind the wheel! Just then the car started slowly rolling forward again. He was beginning to get really freaked out when he noticed a curve in the road ahead. He was just thinking about climbing into the front seat when a hand mysteriously appeared through the window and moved the wheel.

The guy, paralyzed in terror, watched how the hand appeared every time right before a curve.

Gathering his courage, the guy finally jumped out of the car and ran to the nearest town. Wet and in shock, he went to a restaurant and started telling everybody about the horrible experience he just went through.

About half an hour later, two guys walked into the same rest- aurant. They were looking around for a table when one said to the other, “Hey, look, isn’t that the jerk who got in the car when we were pushing it?”

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