Daily Stuff 6-10-15 Barbarossa

Hi, folks!

 

Partly Sunny Weather MotifIt’s so *pretty* outside! The sun is shining and the wind is blowing. The sunlight is pale gold and striking metallic sparks from the alder. The roses are brilliant colors and the *green*! It’s 55F and no real chance of rain for the next 10 days.

plant motif hyacinth flowerYesterday I got a fair amount done, but Tempus was feeling a little icky. He spent part of the day curled up in bed. Most of what happened was chores, but I also got a couple more projects worked out and a set of books put away in my study, plus a lot of shop paperwork. In the evening Tempus went to Marius’ and they worked on some armor while I did some writing.

Today Tempus is going into Newport to do some shopping after running some errands, early on. I have to set up the week’s newsletters and then when he gets back, start into some cooking.

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feast 0610 BarbarossaToday is the anniversary of the death of Frederick 1, Barbarossa. His nickname means “red beard”. He drowned on the way to the 3rd crusade, which led to that war’s failure. He had been a personification of the “good king” for most of the people of Europe, and is still featured in stories of the “sleeping king”. He was elected King of Germany and conquered Italy, finally becoming Holy Roman Emperor. Lots more here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor

plant pic Adiantum_pedatumToday’s Plant – Maidenhair Fern is cultivated for use in gardens, but out here on the coast you can’t walk past a stand of trees without seeing it. Our variety is Adiantum Pedatum, (northern maidenhair, five-fingered fern) most often , but others of the aidantums get mixed in, too. – Feminine, Venus, Water – This represents the physical presence of the Divine Feminine, much as the Sword Fern represents the Divine Masculine. To get more in touch with this part of your Higher Self and to gain grace and physical beauty (always remembering that true beauty is from within) soak a sprig of this plant in water (…better by moonlight, and it’s a great ritual for a Full Moon) and hang it in your bedroom. This is also helpful for the transition times between life stages, and can even help with becoming pregnant if there are physical difficulties with a woman’s cycles. More here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adiantum_pedatum and on the family grouping here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maidenhair_fern

Litha PentacleThe shop is closed on Wednesdays! Summer hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Waning Crescent MoonWaning Moon Magick From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends on 6/16 at 7:05am. Waning Crescent Moon – Best time for beginning introspective magicks that are more long term (full year cycle) A good time for beginning knot magicks to “bind up” addictions and illness (finish just before the Tide Change of Dark to New) and “tying up loose ends” God/dess aspects – Demeter weeping for her Daughter, Mabon, Arachne Tyr. Phase ends on 6/11 at 10:05pm. 

Astro StarCan you see the big Coma Berenices star cluster? Does your light pollution really hide it, or do you just not know exactly where to look? It’s currently high in the west; look 40% of the way from Denebola (Leo’s tail) to the end of the Big Dipper’s handle (Ursa Major’s tail). Its brightest members form an inverted Y. The cluster is about 5° wide — a big, dim glow in at least a moderately dark sky. It nearly fills a binocular view with its sparsely scattered points.
Astro neptuneNeptune (magnitude +7.9, in Aquarius) is in the southeast before the first light of dawn.

Goddess Month of Hera runs from 5/16 – 6/12
Goddess Month of Rosea runs from 6/13 – 7/10
Celtic Tree Month of Duir/Oak, Jun 10 – Jul 7
Rune Runic Month 11 Odal Othila EthilaRunic Half-month of Othala/ Odal/Odel 5/29-6/13- The rune Odel signifies ancestral property, the homestead, and all those things that are “one’s own”… Runic half-month of Dagaz/ Dag, 6/14-6/28. – Beneficial rune of light, health, prosperity and openings, signifying the high point of the day and the high point of the year when in light and warmth all things are possible.

Sun in GeminiSun in Gemini
Moon in AriesMoon in Pisces enters Aries at 4:14am
Ceres (9/14/15), Mercury (6/11/15), Pluto (9/25/15) and Saturn (8/2/15) Retrograde
Color: Brown

Harvest 6/10-11

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©2015 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright.

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motif,tree celtic duir oregon white oak garryCeltic Tree Month of Duir/Oak, Jun 10 – Jul 7 – The oak of myth and legend is the common oak (Quercus robur L.). It is sometimes called the great oak, which is a translation of its Latin name (robur is the root of the English word “robust”). It grows with ash and beech in the lowland forests, and can reach a height of 150 feet and age of 800 years. Along with ashes, oaks were heavily logged throughout recent millennia, so that the remaining giant oaks in many parts of Europe are but a remnant of forests past. Like most other central and northern European trees, common oaks are deciduous, losing their leaves before Samhain and growing new leaves in the spring so that the trees are fully clothed by Bealltaine. Common oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America, as are the similar native white oak, valley oak, and Oregon oak. Oaks are meduir oak Quercus_roburmbers of the Beech family (Fagaceae). Curtis Clark
Duir – Oak Ogam letter correspondences
Month: May
Color: Black and Dark Brown
Class: Chieftain
Letter: D
Meaning: Security; Strength
duir celtic tree month Snowbowlaspensto study this month – Eadha – White Poplar or Aspen Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Silver White
Class: Shrub
Letter: E
Meaning: Problems; Doubts; Fears.

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Waves tide

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Tides for Alsea Bay
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~           /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                    Visible
W   10      Low   1:46 AM     1.6   5:32 AM    Rise  1:57 AM      48
~    10     High   7:25 AM     5.7   9:00 PM     Set  2:31 PM
~    10      Low   1:39 PM     0.7
~    10     High   8:16 PM     7.5

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Today Is Not a Dress Rehearsal!

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – I wish… – I wish I could be like…. This person is special because….

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Quotes 

~  NOTHING IS PERMANENT EXCEPT CHANGE.  – Jean Kashieca
~  Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes.  Art is knowing which ones to keep. – Scott Adams, Cartoonist
~  Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery; None but ourselves can free our mind. – Bob Marley
~  The idea is to write it so that people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart. – Maya Angelou

WALKING AWAY (for Sean)

It is eighteen years ago, almost to the day —
A sunny day with leaves just turning,
The touch-lines new-ruled — since I watched you play
Your first game of football, then, like a satellite
Wrenched from its orbit, go drifting away

Behind a scatter of boys. I can see
You walking away from me towards the school
With the pathos of a half-fledged thing set free
Into a wilderness, the gait of one
Who finds no path where the path should be.

That hesitant figure, eddying away
Like a winged seed loosened from its parent stem,
Has something I never quite grasp to convey
About nature’s give-and-take — the small, the scorching
Ordeals which fire one’s irresolute clay.

I have had worse partings, but none that so
Gnaws at my mind still. Perhaps it is roughly
Saying what God alone could perfectly show —
How selfhood begins with a walking away,
And love is proved in the letting go. – C. Day-Lewis (1904-1972), Irish poet, who also wrote popular mystery novels under the name of Nicholas Blake

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Heron Bar Litha 2013Litha Magick – 

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S LORE – Pagan Studies

Cinquefoil, campion, lupine and foxglove nod on your doorstep; Nutka rose, salal bells, starflower and bleeding-heart hide in the woods, fully green now. Litha has come, longest day of the year, height of the sun. Of old, in Europe, Litha was the height too of pagan celebrations, the most important and widely honored of annual festivals.

Fire, love and magick wreathe ’round this time. As on Beltane in Ireland, across Europe people of old leaped fires for fertility and luck on Midsummer Day, or on the night before, Midsummer Eve, according to Funk and Wagnall’s Standard Dictionary of Folklore, Mythology and Legend. Farmers drove their cattle through the flames or smoke or ran with burning coals across the cattle pens. In the Scottish Highlands, herders circumambulated their sheep with torches lit at the Midsummer fire.

People took burning brands around their fields also to ensure fertility, and in Ireland threw them into gardens and potato fields. Ashes from the fire were mixed with seeds yet to plant. In parts of England country folk thought the apple crop would fail if they didn’t light the Midsummer fires. People relit their house fires from the Midsummer bonfire, in celebration hurled flaming disks heavenward and rolled flaming wheels downhill, burning circles that hailed the sun at zenith.

Midsummer, too, was a lovers’ festival. Lovers clasped hands over the bonfire, tossed flowers across to each other, leaped the flames together. Those who wanted lovers performed love divination. In Scandinavia, girls laid bunches of flowers under their pillows on Midsummer Eve to induce dreams of love and ensure them coming true. In England, it was said if an unmarried girl fasted on Midsummer Eve and at midnight set her table with a clean cloth, bread, cheese and ale, then left her yard door open and waited, the boy she would marry, or his spirit, would come in and feast with her.

Magick crowns Midsummer. Divining rods cut on this night are more infallible, dreams more likely to come true. Dew gathered Midsummer Eve restores sight. Fern, which confers invisibility, was said to bloom at midnight on Midsummer Eve and is best picked then. Indeed, any magickal plants plucked on Midsummer Eve at midnight are doubly efficacious and keep better. You’d pick certain magickal herbs, namely St. Johnswort, hawkweed, vervain, orpine, mullein, wormwood and mistletoe, at midnight on Midsummer Eve or noon Midsummer Day, to use as a charm to protect your house from fire and lightning, your family from disease, negative witchcraft and disaster. A pagan gardener might consider cultivating some or all of these; it’s not too late to buy at herb-oriented nurseries. Whichever of these herbs you find, a gentle snip into a cloth, a spell whispered over, and you have a charm you can consecrate in the height of the sun.

In northern Europe, the Wild Hunt was often seen on Midsummer Eve, hallooing in the sky, in some districts led by Cernunnos. Midsummer’s Night by European tradition is a fairies’ night, and a witches’ night too. Rhiannon Ryall writes in West Country Wicca that her coven, employing rites said to be handed down for centuries in England’s West Country, would on Midsummer Eve decorate their symbols of the God and Goddess with flowers, yellow for the God, white for the Goddess. The coven that night would draw down the moon into their high priestess, and at sunrise draw down the sun into their high priest. The priest and priestess then celebrated the Great Rite, known to the coven as the Rite of Joining or the Crossing Rite.

Some of Ryall’s elders called this ritual the Ridencrux Rite. They told how formerly in times of bad harvest or unseasonable weather, the High Priestess on the nights between the new and full moon would go to the nearest crossroads, wait for the first stranger traveling in the district. About this stranger the coven had done ritual beforehand, to ensure he embodied the God. The high priestess performed the Great Rite with him to make the next season’s sowing successful.

In the Middle Ages in Europe, traces of witchcraft and pagan remembrances were often linked with Midsummer. In Southern Estonia, Lutheran Church workers found a cottar’s wife accepting sacrifices on Midsummer Day, Juhan Kahk writes in Early Modern European Witchcraft: Centres and Peripheries, edited by Bengt Ankarloo and Gustave Henningsen. Likewise, on

Midsummer Night in 1667, in Estonia’s Maarja-Magdaleena parish, peasants met at the country manor of Colonel Griefenspeer to perform a ritual to cure illnesses.

In Denmark, writes Jens Christian V. Johansen in another Early Modern European Witchcraft chapter, medieval witches were said to gather on Midsummer Day, and in Ribe on Midsummer Night. Inquisitors in the Middle Ages often said witches met on Corpus Christi, which some years fell close to Midsummer Eve, according to Witchcraft in the Middle Ages, by Jeffrey Burton Russell. The inquisitors explained witches chose the date to mock a central Christian festival, but Corpus Christi is no more important than a number of other Christian holidays, and it falls near a day traditionally associated with pagan worship. Coincidence? Probably not.

Anciently, pagans and witches hallowed Midsummer. Some burned for their right to observe their rites; we need not. But we can remember the past. In solidarity with those burned, we can collect our herbs at midnight; we can burn our bonfires and hail the sun. – By Melanie Fire Salamander and GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Late Night Funny – Ferrari just debuted a new muscle car that can go from zero to 124 miles per hour in under nine seconds. Drivers here in L.A. said, “How fast can it go from zero to 3 miles an hour? Because that’s really as fast as you can go here.” – Jimmy Fallon

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