Daily Stuff 10-1-15 October Begins

Hi, folks!

Waves tide Minus Tide at 10:07 PM of -0.8 feet.

52F with a very light breeze and sunny! We supposedly got a trace of rain 092615 Fennel2last night. I haven’t been out yet but things look dry.

>>>>> fennel from the dehydrator >>>>>

plant motif heather flower herb
Yesterday started slowly. We both got up later than usual, although Tempus didn’t finally crawl out of bed until nearing noon. He was running back and forth doing chores during the day and I was sorting papers and working on newsletters. I did get my bath, finally.

092615 Queen Anne's LaceI looked out the window at 10 minutes to 7 and the light was turning red. We’re sliding quickly into winter! The alder is minus a bunch more leaves since the last time I commented on it, about 2/3 gone, now.

>>>>> Queen Anne’s Lace blossoms >>>>>

plant motif horse chestnut tree flowerWe had chicken baked with sweet&sour sauce for supper with a side of rice, peas and corn, then Tempus crashed. He calls it, “Python syndrome”. 🙂 I talked with friends for awhile and then crawled in with a book and cuddled up to him.

Today I’m going to be the one at the shop. He’s going to be up on the roof again. Late this afternoon is Sewing at the shop.

Season of the Witch October wise

Calendar OctoberToday’s Feast is that October begins! Some October info:

Sacred to Goddess Astraea, daughter of Zeus and Themis. She lived among humans in the Golden Age but when civilization deteriorated she withdrew to the upperworld.

October’s child is born for woe,
And life’s vicissitudes must know
But lay an Opal on her breast,
And hope will lull those woes to rest. ~Traditional English Proverb

In some Saxon calendars, allegorized by the figure of a husbandman carrying a sack on his shoulders, sowing corn. In other old calendars, the sport of hawking is represented.

The month for making beer, wine, cider, because of steady temperature.

This is the Irish month of Deireadh Fomhair. The Frankish name, Windurmanoth, means ‘vintage month’. American backwoods: Hunter’s Moon. Asatru name: Hunting.

Weather lore of October (Northern Hemisphere): the more bright red berries (haws and hips) that can be seen in the hedgerows, the more frost and snow there will be the next Winter.

The second ‘Summer’ in October is called Indian Summer in America, St Bridget’s Summer in Sweden; in Italy, the Summer of St Teresa; in Germany and Switzerland, the Summer of St Gall. In England, it is called St Luke’s Summer.

Much rain in October said to correspond with much rain in December. A warm October makes a cold February.

Bittersweet October – The mellow, messy, leaf-kicking, perfect pause between the opposing miseries of summer and winter.  ~Carol Bishop Hipps

If October bring much frost and wind,
Then are January and February mild. ~Traditional English weather proverb

In October dung your field,
And your land its wealth shall yield. ~Traditional English proverb

Birth flowers: Calendula and cosmos.

Birthstone: Opal, signifying hope. Said to bring bad luck to those not born in this month who wear it.

The Wiki article is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/October

220px-Iris_tenaxamor irisToday’s plant is Oregon IrisIris tenax. I grew up calling Iris flowers “ladies’ ball gowns”. Local peoples used the tough leaves for making string and rope mostly for snares. – Feminine, Venus, Water – sacred to Iris and Juno, their magicks are used for purification and magicks including 3’s. The three petals stand for faith, wisdom and valor and can be used in magicks to promote these qualities. More on Oregon Iris here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iris_tenax More on Iris in general here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iris_%28plant%29

Samhain PentacleThe shop opens at 11am! Fall hours are 11am-6pm Thursday through Monday and closing will drift earlier with sunset times. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Waning Gibbous moonWaning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 10/12 at 5:06pm. Waning Gibbous Moon – Best time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. – Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 10/4 at 2:06pm.

Taurus aldebaranThe waning gibbous Moon rises around 9 or 10 p.m., shining in the Hyades near Aldebaran. The Moon occults Aldebaran during dawn Friday morning for the West Coast, and in broad daylight Friday morning for telescope users in nearly all the rest of the U.S. and Canada. See the map and times in the September Sky & Telescope, page 49.
Astro SaturnSaturn (magnitude +0.6, at the Scorpius-Libra border) is sinking ever lower in the southwest at dusk. Left of it by 11° twinkles orange Antares.

WEBvic15_Oct03mo

Goddess Month of Mala runs from 9/6 – 10/2
Goddess Month of Hathor runs from 10/3 – 10/30
Celtic Tree Month of Gort/Ivy – Sep 30 – Oct 27
Rune Runic Month 19 Gyfu GyboRunic half-month of Gebo/ Gyfu – Sept 28-Oct 12 – Gyfu represents the unity that a gift brings between the donor & recipient. It is a time of unification, both between members of society and between the human and divine. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, p. 102

Sun in LibraSun in Libra
MOon in TaurusMoon in  Taurus enters Gemini at 1:03pm
Mercury (10/9), Vesta (11/13/15) and Chiron (11/27/15) Retrograde
Color: Green

Planting 9-30-10/1

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©2015 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright.

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Ivy Gort Celtic tree month Hedera_helixGort  Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27 – Gort – (GORT), ivy – Ivy (Hedera helix L.) is also a vine, growing to 30 m (100 feet) long in beech woods and around human habitations, where it is widely planted as a ground cover. Ivy produces greenish flowers before Samhain on short, vertical shrubby branches. The leaves of these flowering branches lack the characteristic lobes of the leaves of the rest of the plant. Like holly, ivy is evergreen, its dark green leaves striking in the bare forests of midwinter. Ivy is widely cultivated in North America. It is a member of the Ginseng family (Araliaceae).

motif plant herb Ivy sprig gort celtic tree monthGort – Ivy Ogam letter correspondences
Month: September
Color: Sky Blue
Class: Chieftain
Letter: G
Meaning: Take time to soul search or you will maake a wrong decision.

Honeysuckle Gort cletic tree month Lonicera_ciliosato study this month Uilleand – Honeysuckle Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Yellow-white
Class: Peasant
Letter: P, PE, UI
Meaning: Proceed with caution.

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Waves tide

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Tides for Alsea Bay
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~           /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                    Visible
Th   1     High   3:31 AM     7.5   7:14 AM     Set 11:29 AM      89
~     1      Low   9:20 AM     1.3   6:57 PM    Rise  9:43 PM
~     1     High   3:21 PM     8.6
~     1      Low  10:07 PM    -0.8

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – I am willing to do all that the Mother lets me know needs to be done. Attachment to other aims leads to frustration.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Expository – Write everything you know about your ancestors on your father’s side of the family.

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Quotes 

~  Behavioral psychology is the science of pulling habits out of rats. – Douglas Busch
~  Don’t let one cloud obliterate the whole sky. – Anaïs Nin
~  The louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons. – Ralph Waldo Emerson
~  Life flows so beautifully when you accept the situation and don’t resist ‘what is! – Sharon Tucker Caldararo

All Saints’ Day, a time of pleasant gossiping,
The gale and the storm keep equal pace,
It is the labour of falsehood to keep a secret. – From The Heroic Elegies of Llywarch Hên (6th-Century Welsh), translated by Dr W Owen Pughe, 1792 (William Hone, The Every-Day Book, or a Guide to the Year, William Tegg and Co., London, 1878, 711 – 712; 1825-26 edition online)

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Samhain border

Samhain Magick – The Celtic Year – Samhain

Samhain marks one of the two great doorways of the Celtic year, for the Celts divided the year into two seasons: the light and the dark, at Beltane on May 1st and Samhain on November 1st. Some believe that Samhain was the more important festival, marking the beginning of a whole new cycle, just as the Celtic day began at night. For it was understood that in dark silence comes whisperings of new beginnings, the stirring of the seed below the ground. Whereas Beltane welcomes in the summer with joyous celebrations at dawn, the most magically potent time of this festival is November Eve, the night of October 31st, known today of course, as Halloween.

Samhain (Scots Gaelic: Samhuinn) literally means “summer’s end.” In Scotland and Ireland, Halloween is known as Oíche Shamhna, while in Wales it is Nos Calan Gaeaf, the eve of the winter’s calend, or first. With the rise of Christianity, Samhain was changed to Hallowmas, or All Saints’ Day, to commemorate the souls of the blessed dead who had been canonized that year, so the night before became popularly known as Halloween, All Hallows Eve, or Hollantide. November 2nd became All Souls Day, when prayers were to be offered to the souls of all who the departed and those who were waiting in Purgatory for entry into Heaven. Throughout the centuries, pagan and Christian beliefs intertwine in a gallimaufry of celebrations from Oct 31st through November 5th, all of which appear both to challenge the ascendancy of the dark and to revel in its mystery.

In the country year, Samhain marked the first day of winter, when the herders led the cattle and sheep down from their summer hillside pastures to the shelter of stable and byre. The hay that would feed them during the winter must be stored in sturdy thatched ricks, tied down securely against storms. Those destined for the table were slaughtered, after being ritually devoted to the gods in pagan times. All the harvest must be gathered in — barley, oats, wheat, turnips, and apples — for come November, the faeries would blast every growing plant with their breath, blighting any nuts and berries remaining on the hedgerows. Peat and wood for winter fires were stacked high by the hearth. It was a joyous time of family reunion, when all members of the household worked together baking, salting meat, and making preserves for the winter feasts to come. The endless horizons of summer gave way to a warm, dim and often smoky room; the symphony of summer sounds was replaced by a counterpoint of voices, young and old, human and animal.

In early Ireland, people gathered at the ritual centers of the tribes, for Samhain was the principal calendar feast of the year.   The greatest assembly was the ‘Feast of Tara,’ focusing on the royal seat of the High King as the heart of the sacred land, the point of conception for the new year. In every household throughout the country, hearth-fires were extinguished. All waited for the Druids to light the new fire of the year — not at Tara, but at Tlachtga, a hill twelve miles to the north-west. It marked the burial-place of Tlachtga, daughter of the great druid Mogh Ruith, who may once have been a goddess in her own right in a former age.

At at all the turning points of the Celtic year, the gods drew near to Earth at Samhain, so many sacrifices and gifts were offered up in thanksgiving for the harvest. Personal prayers in the form of objects symbolizing the wishes of supplicants or ailments to be healed were cast into the fire,  and at the end of the ceremonies, brands were lit from the great fire of Tara to re-kindle all the home fires of the tribe, as at Beltane. As they received the flame that marked this time of beginnings, people surely felt a sense of the kindling of new dreams, projects and hopes for the year to come.

The Samhain fires continued to blaze down the centuries.  In the 1860s the Halloween bonfires were still so popular in Scotland that one traveler reported seeing thirty fires lighting up the hillsides all on one night, each surrounded by rings of dancing figures, a practice which continued up to the first World War. Young people and servants lit brands from the fire and ran around the fields and hedges of house and farm, while community leaders surrounded parish boundaries with a magic circle of light. Afterwards, ashes from the fires were sprinkled over the fields to protect them during the winter months — and of course, they also improved the soil. The bonfire provided an island of light within the oncoming tide of winter darkness, keeping away cold, discomfort, and evil spirits long before electricity illumined our nights. When the last flame sank down, it was time to run as fast as you could for home, raising the cry, “The black sow without a tail take the hindmost!”

Even today, bonfires light up the skies in many parts of the British Isles and Ireland at this season, although in many areas of Britain their significance has been co-opted by Guy Fawkes Day, which falls on November 5th, and commemorates an unsuccessful attempt to blow up the English Houses of Parliament in the 17th century. In one Devonshire village, the extraordinary sight of both men and women running through the streets with blazing tar barrels on their backs can still be seen! Whatever the reason, there will probably always be a human need to make fires against the winter’s dark.

Divination at Halloween

Samhain was a significant time for divination, perhaps even more so than May or Midsummer’s Eve, because this was the chief of the three Spirit Nights. Divination customs and games frequently featured apples and nuts from the recent harvest, and candles played an important part in adding atmosphere to the mysteries. In Scotland, a child born at Samhain was said to be gifted with an dà shealladh, “The Two Sights” commonly known as “second sight,” or clairvoyance.

Apple Magic – At the heart of the Celtic Otherworld grows an apple tree whose fruit has magical properties. Old sagas tell of heroes crossing the western sea to find this wondrous country, known in Ireland as Emhain Abhlach, (Evan Avlach) and in Britain, Avalon. At Samhain, the apple harvest is in, and old hearthside games, such as apple-bobbing, called apple-dookin’ in Scotland, reflect the journey across water to obtain the magic apple. 

Dookin’ for Apples – Place a large tub, preferably wooden, on the floor, and half fill it with water. Tumble in plenty of apples, and have one person stir them around vigorously with a long wooden spoon or rod of hazel, ash or any other sacred tree.

Each player takes their turn kneeling on the floor, trying to capture the apples with their teeth as they go bobbing around. Each gets three tries before the next person has a go. Best to wear old clothes for this one, and have a roaring fire nearby so you can dry off while eating your prize!
If you do manage to capture an apple, you might want to keep it for a divination ritual, such as this one:

The Apple and the Mirror – Before the stroke of midnight, sit in front of a mirror in a room lit only by one candle or the moon. Go into the silence, and ask a question. Cut the apple into nine pieces. With your back to the mirror, eat eight of the pieces, then throw the ninth over your left shoulder. Turn your head to look over the same shoulder, and you will see and in image or symbol in the mirror that will tell you your answer.

(When you look in the mirror, let your focus go “soft,” and allow the patterns made by the moon or candlelight and shadows to suggest forms, symbols and other dreamlike images that speak to your intuition.)

Dreaming Stones – Go to a boundary stream and with closed eyes, take from the water three stones between middle finger and thumb, saying these words as each is gathered:

I will lift the stone
As Mary lifted it for her Son,
For substance, virtue, and strength;
May this stone be in my hand
Till I reach my journey’s end.

(Scots Gaelic)
Togaidh mise chlach,
Mar a thog Moire da Mac,
Air bhrìgh, air bhuaidh, ‘s air neart;
Gun robh a chlachsa am dhòrn,
Gus an ruig mi mo cheann uidhe.

Carry them home carefully and place them under your pillow. That night, ask for a dream that will give you guidance or a solution to a problem, and the stones will bring it for you.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – [Borrowed from Reader’s Digest.]

Children’s Vision…

HONESTY  – My son Zachary, 4, came screaming out of the bathroom to tell me he’d dropped his toothbrush in the toilet. So I fished it out and threw it in the garbage. Zachary stood there thinking for a moment, then ran to my bathroom and came out with my toothbrush. He held it up and said with a charming little smile, “We better throw this one out too then, ’cause it fell in the toilet a few days ago.

KETCHUP  – A woman was trying hard to get the ketchup to come out of the jar. During her struggle the phone rang so she asked her 4-year-old daughter to answer the phone. “It’s the minister, Mommy,” the child said to her mother. Then she added, “Mommy can’t come to the phone to talk to you right now. She’s hitting the bottle.”

NUDITY  – I was driving with my three young children one warm summer evening when a woman in the convertible ahead of us stood up and waved. She was stark naked! As I was reeling from the shock, I heard my 5-year-old shout from the back seat, “Mom! That lady isn’t wearing a seat belt!

MORE NUDITY  – A little boy got lost at the YMCA and found himself in the women’s locker room. When he was spotted, the room burst into shrieks, with ladies grabbing towels and running for cover. The little boy watched in amazement and then asked, “What’s the matter haven’t you ever seen a little boy before?”

ELDERLY  – While working for an organization that delivers lunches to elderly shut-ins, I used to take my 4-year-old daughter on my afternoon rounds. The various appliances of old age, particularly the canes, walkers and wheelchairs, unfailingly intrigued her. One day I found her staring at a pair of false teeth soaking in a glass. As I braced myself for the inevitable barrage of questions, she merely turned and whispered, “The tooth fairy will never believe this!”

DRESS-UP  – A little girl was watching her parents dress for a party. When she saw her dad donning his tuxedo, she warned, “Daddy, you shouldn’t wear that suit.” “And why not, darling?” “You know that it always gives you a headache the next morning.”

SCHOOL  – A little girl had just finished her first week of school. “I’m just wasting my time,” she said to her mother. “I can’t read, I can’t write and they won’t let me talk!”

BIBLE  – A little boy opened the big family bible. He was fascinated as he fingered through the old pages. Suddenly, something fell out of the Bible. He picked up the object and looked at it. What he saw was an old leaf that had been pressed in between the pages. “Mama, look what I found”, the boy called out.” What have you got there, dear?” With astonishment in the young boy’s voice, he answered, “I think it’s Adam’s underwear

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