Daily Stuff 12-12-15 jólasveinarnir

Hi, folks!

Christmas in Waldport, today!

Waves tide Minus Tide at 7:23 PM of -0.8 feet

motif yule holiday lightsLighted House Count 171+312.

Weather

Yesterday was long and cranky-making. I was kinda freaked over all the stuff I had to do, and kept running around in circles. Tempus was *very* patient with me. I did get everything packed and as far as I can tell, didn’t forget anything. I had to run back to the house once, and he had to run back once and I had to go to the bank and then I ended up paying far more than I expected for printing, since the shop printer is still not working right.

Marius and I had a good drive down and we’re at the same hotel with a number of friends all around. Likely to be some interesting parties tomorrow night. 🙂

Today is the main part of my weekend event. We have to be at the site at 8am, so this is short. The judging is at 11am and then court from 1-6pm. (Egads…) I’m probably going to come back to the hotel and collapse, although there’s an evening feast.

Tempus will have the shop open today! There are no workshops scheduled, but Christmas in Waldport runs from 5-9pm. There’s a lighted bridge walk, the tree lighting, Santa is due to show up and a lot of the shops will be open all during that time. Come to each and get tickets for the drawing for a gift basket! Ruth Miller will be at Ancient Light from 6-9 discussing Adopting and Adapting the Symbols of the Season.

Ken Gagne with the ocean visiting someone’s yard in Yachats.

12188220_1271746596174664_2359472085698554093_ocopper ornsA whole set of copper wire ornaments and pagan-friendly shapes.

Today’s Plant is Luffa (or loofah, luffa aegyptica orluffa acutangula). This is an odd sort of plant, rather like a cucumber in that it’s a long, green vegetable with the flesh on the outside and a core full of seeds. They’re even edible, if a little bitter, when young. The biggest difference is that they grow a fibrous luffaframe that has been used for a long time as a “vegetable sponge” wherever they grow, and are particularly good for scrubbing scratchable dishes, counters and glassware. They’re used a lot in Chinese medicine, and the juice is a remedy for jaundice. – Feminine, Moon, Water – Their magicks include helping with rheumatism and arthritis, detoxing, especially the liver, and with acne and scarring. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luffa

200px-Yule_lads_in_Dimmuborgir

…and we think we’ve got it tough with Santa Claus and having to wait and be good and all! How would you like to be from Iceland where the jólasveinarnir, the Yuletide lads, start showing up on the 12th of December and do things like skimming the cream off the milk, swiping meat out of a pan and they’re all the kids of a pair of trolls!!!! They used to (pretend to) beat kids and sometimes kidnap them, but now they’re a little nicer and look a lot more like Santa’s Elves than gruesome Fae. Here are some pictures: http://jol.ismennt.is/myndasafn3.htm and a little lore: http://jol.ismennt.is/english/christmas-lads-museum.htm (most of the links on that page are broken) Wikipedia has more here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yule_Lads and here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_worldwide#Iceland

Mine - Yule PentacleThe shop opens at 11am . Winter hours are 11am-5pm, Thursday through Monday. Please note that the shop will be closed on 12/25 for Christmas and 1/1 for New Years. We will be open on Wednesday 12/23 and Thursday, 12/24 for last-minute shoppers. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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New MoonNew Moon – The beginning of a new cycle. Keywords for the New phase are: beginning, birth, emergence, projection, clarity. It is the time in a cycle that you are stimulated to take a new action. During this phase the new cycle is being seeded by your vision, inner and outer. Engage in physical activity. Spend time alone. VISUALIZE your goals for the 29.6-day cycle ahead. The new moon is for starting new ventures, new beginnings. Also love and romance, health or job hunting. God/dess aspect: Infancy, the Cosmic Egg, Eyes-Wide-Open – Associated God/dess: Inanna who was Ereshkigal. Phase ends on 12/12 at 2:29pm. Waxing Moon Magick The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 12/25 at 3:12am. Diana’s Bow On the 3rd day after the new moon you can (weather permitting) see the tiny crescent in the sky, the New Moon holding the Old Moon in her arms. Begin on your goals for the next month. A good time for job interviews or starting a project. Take a concrete step! God/dess aspect: Daughter/Son/Innocence – Associated God/dess: Vesta, Horus. Phase ends on 12/15 at 2:29pm. 

GeminiThe Geminid Meteor shower is already active. It will reach its peak late on Sunday and Monday nights, December 13–14 and 14–15. The sky will be moonless. See the December Sky & Telescope, page 44.
Geminid meteors – Monday–Tuesday, Dec. 14–15, midnight to dawn – The Geminid meteor shower, one of the most reliable in the year, peaks near midday on Dec. 14, so the best times to observe will be between midnight and dawn on the mornings of the 14th and 15th.
Astro mercuryMercury is still very deep in glow of sunset, but it’s on its way to a fine apparition later in December.

Goddess Month of Astrea runs from 11/28 – 12/25
Celtic Tree Month of Ruis/Elder  Nov 25 – Dec 22

Rune Runic Month 23 Is IsaRunic half-month of Isa/ Is November 28-12 Literally, ‘ice’: a static period. The time of waiting before birth. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992 Runic half-month of Jera/ Jara 12/13-12/27 – Jara signifies the completion of natural cycles, such as fruition, and has a more transcendent meaning of mystic marriage of Earth and Cosmos. *Ø* Wilson’s Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | December 13

Sun in SagittariusSun in Sagittarius
Moon in CapricornMoon in Capricorn
Color: Grey

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©2015 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright.

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elderberry flower RuisRuis  Elder  Nov 25 – Dec 22 – Ruis – (RWEESH), elder – Celtic tree month of Ruis (Elder) commences (Nov 25 – Dec 22) – Like other Iron Age Europeans, the Celts were a polytheistic people prior to their conversion to (Celtic) Christianity. The Celts divided the year into 13 lunar cycles (months or moons). These were linked to specific sacred trees which gave each moon its name. Today commences the Celtic tree month of Elder.
Elder or Elderberry (Sambucus) is a genus of fast-growing shrubs or small trees in the family Caprifoliaceae. They bear bunches of small white or cream coloured flowers in the Spring, that are followed by bunches of small red, bluish or black berries. The berries are a very valuable food resource for many birds.
Common North American species include American Elder, Sambucus canadensis, in the east, and Blueberry Elder, Sambucus glauca, in the west; both have blue-black berries.
The common European species is the Common or Black Elder, Sambucus nigra, with black berries.
plant red elderberry RuisThe common elder (Sambucus nigra L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (33 feet) in damp clearings, along the edge of woods, and especially near habitations. Elders are grown for their blackish berries, which are used for preserves and wine. The leaf scars have the shape of a crescent moon. Elder branches have a broad spongy pith in their centers, much like the marrow of long bones, and an elder branch stripped of its bark is very bone-like. The red elder (S. racemosa L.) is a similar plant at higher elevations; it grows to 5 m (15 feet). Red elder extends its native range to northern North America, and it is cultivated along with other native species, but common elders are seldom seen in cultivation. Elders are in the Honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae).
plant motif Elderberry RuisRuis – Elder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: Makeup days of the thirteenth Moon
Color: Red
Class: Shrub
Letter: R
Meaning: End of a cycle or problem.
elder month Husband_and_wife_trees - Blackthorn Ruisto study this month Straif – Blackthorn Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Purple
Class: Chieftain
Letter: SS, Z, ST
Meaning: Resentment; Confusion; Refusing to see the truth

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Waves tide

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Tides for Alsea Bay
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~           /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                    Visible
Sa  12     High   1:16 AM     7.0   7:43 AM    Rise  8:31 AM      0
12      Low   6:35 AM     3.1   4:37 PM     Set  6:19 PM
12     High  12:21 PM     8.6
12      Low   7:23 PM    -0.8

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – I don’t have to see what my heart tells me is true.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What do you think? – What occupation do you think would be fascinating?

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Quotes 

~  In order to be irreplaceable one must always be different. – Coco Chanel
~  Cherish all your happy moments; they make a fine cushion for your old age. – Christopher Morely
~  A man can get discouraged many times, but he is not a failure until he begins to blame somebody else and stops trying. – John Burroughs
~  Like all New York hotel lady cashiers she had red hair and had been disappointed in her first husband. – Al Capp (1909-1979) US cartoonist

Catechism for a Witch’s Child by J.L. Stanley

When they ask to see your gods
your book of prayers
show them lines
drawn delicately with veins
on the underside of a bird’s wing
tell them you believe
in giant sycamores mottled
and stark against a winter sky
and in nights so frozen
stars crack open spilling streams of molten ice to earth
and tell them how you drank
the holy wine of honeysuckle
on a warm spring day
and of the softness
of your mother
who never taught you
death was life’s reward
but who believed in the earth
and the sun
and a million, million light years
of being.

******

Yule Log 122413Yule Magick – Recipes

Irish Lamb Stew
1 boneless leg of lamb, about 2 pounds
3 tablespoons of oil
2 medium onions, chopped
1 clove of garlic, minced
1 tablespoons flour
2 cups beef or vegetable stock
1 teaspoon salt
Black pepper to taste
¼ teaspoon rosemary
1 bay leaf
1 pound of potatoes, cut into pieces
6 carrots, sliced
1 pound frozen peas
(for a more traditional stew, add 3 large turnips, cut into bit size pieces,
2 cups of cabbage and ¼ cup of cream)

Cut lamb into cubes. Heat oil in a heavy saucepan, add lamb and cook until lightly browned, remove from pan. Add onion and garlic and cook for a few minutes. Add flour and stir, heat until mixture browns. Gradually add stock while stirring. Return meat to saucepan. Add salt, pepper, rosemary and bay leaf. Cover and simmer for 1 hour or until meat is almost tender. Add potatoes, carrots and turnips & cabbage (if desired). Cook 30 minutes longer Add peas and onions and continue cooking until peas are tender, about 10-15 minutes. Add cream at the end, if desired (this gives a nice, thick and creamy stew body.

Holiday Shrimp Scampi By Zola Gorgon

I See Food. Do You Seafood?

Serving seafood at the holidays is a tradition in many families. Italian-Americans seem to focus on this the heaviest, with the tradition of serving a huge seafood buffet on Christmas Eve. I tried to research this subject because I’ve heard so many times that serving seafood–especially on New Year’s Eve–is good luck. Now I’m confused. The research I did kept saying you serve seafood up to and on Christmas Eve because of the Christian connection to fasting, but a good host would never serve seafood on Christmas Day! We’re supposed to be finished with our fasting and seafood and dive into huge quantities of meats and sweets, according to my Internet data.

In my childhood household, none of this would have mattered. My mother served Spanish hamburgers to all of us kids on Christmas Day. Yep, “Manwiches.” Why? Because she served her big dinner on the weekend after Christmas. There were so many kids in our family (and as they grew, there were so many boyfriends and girlfriends involved), my mother decided not to fight over which house they ate dinner at. This way she got to have her special meal on her special day and everyone was hungry. If you try to do meals at both places on Christmas Day, someone always loses out. My mother always won the hearts of those at her table this way. And since we “little kids” were only interested in playing with our toys (and probably had gorged on too many cookies and candies already), why serve up a big meal? Spanish hamburgers could be kept warm all day long, and people could eat when they wanted to. The Spanish hamburgers were a “treat” for us, so we thought we were very special.

I’m not going to bother to give you a recipe for Spanish hamburgers. The mix is ready available in a can nowadays. What I am going to give you is my latest seafood development.

I made a special dinner for our neighbors this week. Et and Max are moving back to England and we are going to miss them terribly, so I made a special meal to “celebrate” and to say farewell.

The first course was a shrimp scampi. As I sat eating mine and listening to electric conversation, I dreamed up a holiday version. One element that I added to the usual scampi was a small salad on the side. That’s the cool thing these days with appetizers–little tiny salads on the side to round out the appetizer and make a colorful presentation. This way when you serve a rather small dish, you can put it on a large plate and make it look grand. This one will look grand too. I hope you enjoy it.

However you celebrate the holiday and whatever you eat, you have my very best wishes for a gorgeous event filled with family, friends and fun.

Cheers! and Happy Holidays!

Holiday Shrimp Scampi – Serves 4

This dish can be served anytime, but the red and green elements really play up a Christmas theme. It’s simple and elegant and really FAST. You can make this in just a few minutes to really impress your guests.

12 jumbo shrimp (Peeled and deveined. Leave their tails on if you want to be fancy.)
1 bunch of green onions, diced thinly, with some of the green parts
1/2 green pepper, diced
1/2 red pepper, diced
1/2 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley
3/4 cup butter
1/2 cup dry white wine
2 Tbl lemon juice

Melt the butter in a large sauté pan. At the same time, add the green onions, the red and green pepper and the parsley. Sauté on Medium heat until the onions are tender and the green and red peppers have loosened up a bit but still have bite to them.

Add the shrimp. Cook the large shrimp until they are no longer opaque in the middle. This should take about 3 minutes. They will curl in the process.

Take the shrimp out of the pan with a tongs and set them on the serving plates 3 to a plate. Balance the third one up against the other two to give your presentation depth. Add the white wine to the skillet and turn it on Medium High so it boils. Boil down the mixture for 1 full minute and add the lemon juice.

Now spoon this sauce over the shrimp and Voilà!

If you are serving the side salad, you can have the salad all plated and ready to serve before you begin to cook the shrimp scampi. This will allow you to get the dish to table while the shrimp are hot.

Side salad for Holiday Shrimp Scampi

One cup (maximum) assorted baby greens per person
1 chopped red pepper to add color

Dressing:

1/4 cup walnut pieces
2 Tbl mustard (Dijon, preferably)
2 Tbl red wine vinegar
1 cup olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste (Optional; just a dash will do it.)

In your blender, grind up the walnuts, 2 tablespoons of mustard and a drizzle of the olive oil (just enough to get the blender moving). Grind until well chopped. Then, in a small stream, add the rest of the olive oil. This will make a thick dressing and more than you need to dress the 4 small salads. Save the rest to use in another salad or as a sandwich spread. Lightly dress your greens and toss. Put them on the plate and top with the red pepper bits. Grind a bit of salt and pepper on top (optional).

Enjoy!

Hearty Chili with Red Beans

  • 1 pound Ground Venison or Lean ground beef
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and chopped fine
  • 16 ounces red kidney beans, drained (I use Bush’s brand)
  • 1 16-ounce can of prepared chili (I use Texas Pete’s brand)
  • Shredded Cheddar cheese (optional)
  • Sliced scallion greens (optional)
  • In a cast iron skillet, brown meat, breaking into crumbles as it cooks. Add onions and cook until onions are clear. Add beans and chili. Simmer on low heat until bubbling hot.
  • Serve in bowls garnished with cheese and scallions if desired. Also good with corn bread or steamed rice.
  • Serves 4 – 6

 

  • Egyptian Kabobs
    2 whole chicken breasts, skinned and boned
    1 tablespoon yogurt
    ¼ teaspoon salt
    ¼ teaspoon tumeric
    1/8 teaspoon dry mustard
    ½ teaspoon curry powder
    1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom
    1 teaspoon lemon juice
    1 teaspoon vinegar
    8 thin onion slices
    4 small tomatoes
  1. Cut each chicken into 16 squares.
  2. Combine with the yogurt, salt, turmeric, mustard, curry powder, cardamom, lemon juice and vinegar and let stand for 1/2 hour.
  3. Thread on skewers 2 chicken pieces, 1 slice of onion, 2 chicken
    pieces, 1/2 tomato.
  4. Repeat till all ingredients are used.
  5. Cook slowly, turning occasionally and brushing with the marinade, over hot coals OR under the broiler till the chicken is tender, about 10 minutes.
  6. Transfer to a hot platter, sprinkle with lemon juice and garnish with fresh tomatoes, green pepper rings and fresh mint or parsley.

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motif Silliness SmilieSillinessMistletoes funny Yule

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