Daily Stuff 1-10-16 Rubicon

Hi, folks!

Waves tide Minus Tide at 7:05 PM of -1.1 feet.

37F here in Portland and 43 at home, but both places clear and rather still. I got to watch the sun come up over Mt. Hood this morning. That was *awesome*! Before sunrise it was all shades of pale blue, slate blue and pearly drifts of fog and cloud. Then just as the sun was rising the clouds were topped with a beautiful, shimmering gold-copper and then the sun came up…. and words fail me…..

motif plant flower bluebonnets2Yesterday started a little early for me. I woke around 7am and got the newsletter out early to make sure I didn’t miss again! By 8, everyone else was awake and dressing. We got pix. At about 8:30 we all headed down to the main court area to line up for the fashion show and when Hatch turned up there was some running around to get him dressed and the find the pieces of his outfit, but we all got there and processed in as a group. Various people caught us during the day and commented on how cool it was to see us all dressed similarly. Tempus and I trotted off to the merchant area and got started on that and everyone else scattered for the day’s fun stuff.

motif plant flower calceolariaMy workshop went pretty well (if 3 1/2 hours late!) and I got a little time to wander and talk to friends. I’ve got the promise of some Czech books that I’ve been wanting from one merchant and shoe patterns from another. Yes, the event is paying for itself, which makes our wallets happy.

We finally got to close our booth at 8pm and came back to the room, but we had to wait for one of our roomies to come back with a room key. 🙂 Tempus and I stayed in the sitting area by the elevators and watched other SCAdians running in and out, wearing interesting stuff. We almost got ourselves bopped with “Wassail Sticks”by the household that was running around doing that. 🙂

motif plant flower cattleya-orchidOMGS, the costumes! Wow!

Eventually we were back in the room and had some toasts with the house and then they scattered for parties and Tempus and I, being the old coots, crawled into bed. Not that we slept! We talked over the events of the day and eventually dropped off. Hatch had headed home and Kayle and Marius didn’t get back until long after we had finally dropped off.

motif plant flower christmasbellsblandfordiaWe’re all up. Tempus is down in the merchant room and as soon I have this done, I’m heading that way so he can get back to the room to finish packing. We’ll be merchanting until noon, then pack down and head home.

Today’s plant is Nasturtium, Tropaeolum majus, (not watercress, which is true nasturtium). It’s certainly not native to the PNW, but grows well here. I love the brilliant oranges and yellows of the flowers. They’re yummy, too, with a slightly peppery taste, both leaf and flower, and the seeds serve as a substitute for capers in pickles. The flowers stand for Victory in Battle;motif flower Nasturtium-TropaeolumPatriotism and Affectation and are little used in magicks other than as symbols and foods for Ostara and Beltane celebrations because of their association with the Sun. They also can be used as a symbol for sacrifice to the larger good of soldiers, firemen and police, but are usually only seen at funerals in this context. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropaeolum_majus

0110 newsletter feast caesar coin49 BCE The date often given as the day that Julius Caesar famously crossed the Rubicon. – “As he crossed the river into Italy, he exclaimed “iacta alea est” (the die is cast) knowing full well that this action signified a declaration of war against Pompey. This gave rise to the common English-language expression ‘to cross the Rubicon’, meaning ‘to pass a point of no return, one where an action taken commits a person irrevocably’.” This is quoted from http://www.wilsonsalmanac.com/book/jan10.html (link is broken)
More about the Rubicon here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubicon

motif Imbolc PentacleThe shop will be closed for our annual vacation from 1/5-1/13. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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New MoonNew Moon – The beginning of a new cycle. Keywords for the New phase are: beginning, birth, emergence, projection, clarity. It is the time in a cycle that you are stimulated to take a new action. During this phase the new cycle is being seeded by your vision, inner and outer. Engage in physical activity. Spend time alone. VISUALIZE your goals for the 29.6-day cycle ahead. The new moon is for starting new ventures, new beginnings. Also love and romance, health or job hunting. God/dess aspect: Infancy, the Cosmic Egg, Eyes-Wide-Open – Associated God/dess: Inanna who was Ereshkigal. Phase ends on 1/11 at 5:31am. Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 1/23 at 5:46pm. 

120615 Comet CatalinaComet Catalina (C/2013 US10) remains about 6th magnitude. It’s between the Arcturus and the handle of the Big Dipper this week: well up in the east by 2 a.m., and high overhead just before the first light of dawn. It’s likely to start fading rapidly now. See the December Sky & Telescope, page 45, or Bob King’s article online. Both provide finder charts. – See more at: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/sky-at-a-glance/this-weeks-sky-at-a-glance-january-8-16/#sthash.fRK9tm0C.dpuf
Astro Constellation Big Dipper PolarisIn this very coldest time of the year, the dim Little Dipper hangs straight down from Polaris after dinnertime, as if (per Leslie Peltier) from a nail on the cold north wall of the sky. The Big Dipper, meanwhile, is creeping up low in the north-northeast. Its handle is very low and its bowl is to the upper right.
New MoonNew Moon (exact at 8:31 p.m. EST).
Perseus astro constallation AlgolAlgol should be at minimum light for a couple hours centered on 7:20 p.m. EST.

Astro mercuryMercury is out of sight, passing through inferior conjunction. At its next inferior conjunction, on May 9th, it will cross the face of the Sun for the first transit of Mercury since 2006. At least part of the transit will be visible from all of the Americas, Europe, Africa, and much of Asia.

Goddess Month of Hestia runs from 12/26 – 1/22
Celtic Tree Month of Beth/Birch, Dec 24 – Jan 20, Beith – (BEH), birch 
Rune Runic Month 01 Eoh EihwazRunic half-month of Eihwaz/Eoh 12/28-1/11 Represents the dead, and the yew tree, sacred to Winter shamanism. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books Runic half-month of Perdhro/ Peorth, 1/12-1/27. – Feast of Brewing, Druidic, Source: The Phoenix and Arabeth 1992 Calendar.

Sun in CapricornSun in Capricorn
Moon in CapricornMoon in Capricorn enters Aquarius at 12:23pm
Jupiter (5/9), Mercury (1/25) Retrograde
Color: Orange

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©2015 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright.

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Mistletoe SilverBirch Unhewn Stone

tree celtic month birch bethCeltic Tree Month of Beth/Birch, Dec 24 – Jan 20, Beith – (BEH), birch – The silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) is the most common tree birch in much of Europe. It grows up to 30 m (100 feet) high, but is more often found in spreading clumps on sandy soils. It is one of the first trees to colonize an area after a mature forest is cut; this is probably a large part of its symbolic connection with new beginnings. It is cultivated in North America, often under the name of weeping birch. The three trees in my front yard form root sprouts that would take over the bed where they are planted if I didn’t cut them back. The common birch (B. pubescens Ehrh.) is almost as widespread as the silver birch, but grows primarily on acid or peaty soils. It can reach 20 m (65 feet) in height. Birches are members of the Birch family (Betulaceae). Curtis Clark

Plant Tree Birch bethBeth – Birch – Ogam letter correspondences
Month: November
Color: White
Class: Peasant
Letter: B
Meaning: New Beginnings; Changes; Purification.
tree beech birch Celtic Tree Month bethPhagos – Beech Ogam letter correspondences to study this month
Month: None
Color: Orange-brown
Class: Chieftain
Letter: PH, IO
Meaning: New experiences and information coming

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Waves tide

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Tides for Alsea Bay
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~           /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                    Visible
Su  10     High  12:56 AM     7.1   7:51 AM    Rise  8:01 AM      0
~    10      Low   6:17 AM     2.9   4:56 PM     Set  6:10 PM
~    10     High  12:06 PM     8.9
~    10      Low   7:05 PM    -1.1

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Whatever the day brings you, whether it feels good or not, is good for your learning. If it’s good, enjoy it whole-heartedly!

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What do you think? – Why do some people choose to dress differently?

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Quotes 

~  We can lick gravity, but sometimes the paperwork is overwhelming. – Werner Von Braun
~  There’s only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that’s your own self. – Aldous Huxley
~  We must know a force greater than our weaknesses. – Jean Toomer
~  Resolved, never to do anything which I should be afraid to do if it were the last hour of my life. – Jonathan Edwards

Desire for and possession of earthly power never pleased me overmuch, and I did not unduly desire this earthly rule, but that nevertheless I wished for tools and resources for the task that I was commanded to accomplish, which was that I should virtuously and worthily guide and direct the authority which was entrusted to me. You know of course that no one can make known any skill, nor direct and guide any authority, without tools and resources; a man cannot work on any enterprise without resources. In the case of the king, the resources and tools with which to rule are that he have his land fully manned: he must have praying men, fighting men and working men. You also know that without these tools no king may make his ability known. Another aspect of his resources is that he must have the means of support for his tools, the three classes of men. These, then are their means of support: land to live on, gifts, weapons, food, ale, clothing, and whatever else is necessary for each of the three classes of men. Without these things he cannot maintain the tools, nor without the tools can he accomplish any of the things he was commanded to do. Accordingly, I sought the resources with which to exercise the authority, in order that my skills and power would not be forgotten and concealed: because every skill and every authority is soon obsolete and passed over, if it is without wisdom; because no man may bring to bear any skill without wisdom. For whatever is done unthinkingly, cannot be reckoned a skill. To speak briefly: I desired to live worthily as long as I lived, and to leave after my life, to the men who should come after me, the memory of me in good works. – From King Alfred’s translation of Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, chapter XVII. [Keynes & Lapidge, pp 132-33.]  “This is an interpolation by Alfred, not in Boethius. As Alfred says in his preface, he has sometimes translated word for word, and sometimes sense for sense. In a footnote (p. 298), Keynes & Lapidge caution that this paragraph should not be taken as King Alfred’s personal credo. However, it rings true for me, and I acknowledge the man behind the words.”  

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triple Moon border divImbolc Magick – Crafts

Brigit Candleholder
To echo the Goddess’s symbol of the serpent, make this candleholder, which resembles a coiled snake. Follow directions for making a mold for taper candles, with the following differences:
1. Size your holder by wrapping a paper cylinder around whatever candle you intend to use. Remove candle before proceeding further.
2. Dough ropes should be about 1/2 inch wide and a foot long. If candleholder is taller than 4 inches, use toothpicks for extra support.
3. Make the bottom by coiling a rope into a small circle.

  1. After the paper cylinder has been removed, use your candle to gently test of the open end of the candleholder is large enough to accommodate the candle. If it’s too small, delicately press the opening wider. If it’s too large, fill in with bits of salt dough.5 Bake the holder as directed. Turn after the first hour to be sure it does not stick to the pan.
    6 Cool completely after baking. Then paint with snaky patterns, finishing with eyes on the end of the top coil. – From “Circle Round” By Starhawk, Diane Baker and Anne Hill

Make ropes by rolling salt dough clay between your hands. Each rope should be two or three feet long and 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter. If younger children can’t manage such lengths, have them make smaller segments that can be joined later with a little pressure and water. Dip your fingers into the bowl of water occasionally if the dough tends to crack. Roll the paper into a 1 inch wide cylinder and tape it shut. Around this cylinder, tape a piece of wax paper. Coat the wax paper with a thin layer of oil. Lightly moisten a salt dough rope with water. Lay the paper cylinder on its side at one end of the rope. Roll it along the dough, wrapping the rope up the cylinder until it is six inches tall. Be sure the edges of the coiled rope always touch. To provide extra support, at intervals stick severaltoothpicks vertically through the coils. Make a bottom for the mold byshaping another piece of salt dough into a 3/4 inch thick circle that’s larger than the coiled tower in diameter. Moisten the bottom’s surface, then carefully lift the coiled tower onto the bottom piece and press gently to make a seal. Pull the paper cylinder out. This slides out easily, leaving the wax paper. Remove it by gently tugging on the wax paper with one hand while you support the clay coils with the others. Inspect each part of the mold, looking for tiny cracks where melted wax could leak. Press these shut. If the coils start to sag, quickly fashion a paper cylinder around the outside of the coils and tape it closed. Trim it to the same height as the clay, so it won’t get in the way when you are pouring wax. Set the mold in an empty bowl, in case wax leaks through. You are ready to pour. Pouring the wax is thrilling. Go very slowly up each level to make sure no wax is leaking through. If a leak appears, carefully pinch it shut and pour again. Insert the wick. The wax will harden within an hour, long before the clay dries. To unmold, just unwind the clay. If some sticks, soak the candle in cool water and then gently rinse off the clay. The candles have a wonderfully craggy spiral looping from bottom to top, and burn with a lovely strong flame.

Beehive Candles
You can also make beehive candles with great success by coiling ropes of salt dough in a small, deep bowl. A rice bowl is the perfect size.It’s easier to start with making a spiral, about 3 inches across, outside of the bowl, then transferring this into the bottom of the bowl. Next coil the rope inside the bowl until you reach the top. The candle is burned with the dome side up, so the wick has to be extended through the wax at the bottom of the bowl. When the wax is firm enough to insert the wick, use a slightly larger straw than usual, and push it firmly through the candle, into the dough beneath, straight to the bottom of the bowl. The candle unmolds easily: Lift candle and mold from the bowl and uncoil the mold. – From “Circle Round” By Starhawk, Diane Baker and Anne Hill
Make ropes by rolling salt dough clay between your hands. Each rope should be two or three feet long and 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter. If younger children can’t manage such lengths, have them make smaller segments that can be joined later with a little pressure and water. Dip your fingers into the bowl of water occasionally if the dough tends to crack. Roll the paper into a 1 inch wide cylinder and tape it shut. Around this cylinder, tape a piece of wax paper. Coat the wax paper with a thin layer of oil. Lightly moisten a salt dough rope with water. Lay the paper cylinder on its side at one end of the rope. Roll it along the dough, wrapping the rope up the cylinder until it is six inches tall. Be sure the edges of the coiled rope always touch. To provide extra support, at intervals stick severaltoothpicks vertically through the coils. Make a bottom for the mold byshaping another piece of salt dough into a 3/4 inch thick circle that’s larger than the coiled tower in diameter. Moisten the bottom’s surface, then carefully lift the coiled tower onto the bottom piece and press gently to make a seal. Pull the paper cylinder out. This slides out easily, leaving the wax paper. Remove it by gently tugging on the wax paper with one hand while you support the clay coils with the others. Inspect each part of the mold, looking for tiny cracks where melted wax could leak. Press these shut. If the coils start to sag, quickly fashion a paper cylinder around the outside of the coils and tape it closed. Trim it to the same height as the clay, so it won’t get in the way when you are pouring wax. Set the mold inan empty bowl, in case wax leaks through. You are ready to pour. Pouring the wax is thrilling. Go very slowly up each level to make sure no wax is leaking through. If a leak appears, carefully pinch it shut and pour again. Insert the wick. The wax will harden within an hour, long before the clay dries. To unmold, just unwind the clay. If some sticks, soak the candle in cool water and then gently rinse off the clay. The candles have a wonderfully craggy spiral looping from bottom to top, and burn with a lovely strong flame.

Candlemas Candle Wheel – (For Imbolc) – http://members.aol.com/ivycleartoes/cndlweel.html

Materials:

  • Craft wreath
  • Eight white candles
  • Ivy leaves or vines
  • Glue gun

Directions – Either drill thick holes into the wreath so that candles can be placed inside, or just secure them with screw-bottom candleholders or glue gun glue. Place the ivy leaves around in a decorative fashion.

Ritual use – The eight candles are symbolic of the eight spokes of the year, and spinning the circle into motion at Imbolc is important. In ritual, the candles can be solemnly lit with a cauldron or bowl placed in the middle of the candle wheel. The cauldron or bowl can have the Wish Tree in the middle of it, with water all around it, and have new pennies thrown into it while cementing the wishes. Also the tree and the candle wheel can be toasted.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – nerdy periodic funny

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