Daily Stuff 7-1-16 Nag Panchami

Hi, folks!

220px-Fireworks_on_Canada_DAY3rd of July is the Fireworks in Waldport! That’s this coming Sunday! If you want to come celebrate with us we’re doing a cookout in front of the shop. Bring a dish to share! We’ve got the hotdogs and burgers! We’re only a block from the best spots to watch the display so come celebrate Independence Day with us!

Waves tide

First Minus tide of the cycle at 4:52 AM of -0.8 feet.

part sun weather motifThe weather is lovely again. There are a lot of high wispy mare’s tail clouds, which occasionally block the sun, but it’s 62F, breezy and dry. The marine layer is rather tattered looked but out by the horizon. There’s still a little snow in the mountains, which is pretty good. 

062616 FLower3Yesterday went pretty easily and went by quickly. It was pretty quiet as far as customers went, although we had a few sales. I’m still processing in things we’ve found in the move/clean-up, some going to materials, some going for sale and some into boxes of things that we’re keeping.

Tempus got the other tire on the car, but it took awhile, so I ended up missing Sewing. 062616 FLower4There were several people there, though, in any case, and they got pictures and told me how it was going on Facebook and I sent info, likewise, since I was working on a roll of blackwork.

We ended up with a Sewing Night at the shop afterwards. One of the folks came back and was consulting about different kinds of fabrics and uses for same.

We finally left the shop past 8:30 and 062616 FLower5Tempus had a shopping list to do before he started his run (getting goodies for the 3rd!). The papers were late and he was finally on the road just before midnight and done at 4:30. For some reason when he came in (I was asleep and dreaming) I thought that the 062716 Flower4ceiling was falling in on me and flailed my way upright and gasping. I fell asleep again pretty quickly, though.

Today we were up with just enough time to get to the shop, but that meant that Tempus forgot to grab the coffee, so he’s headed back to get that and the stuff for pickled eggs, that also got forgotten.

We need to get the shelf units into the back, first thing, and then I hope I can get Tempus up to the house and clearing more stuff.

Anybody need these? :-) Who ya gonna call?!

6

225px-Naag_poojaToday’s feast is Nag Panchami, in honor of the Nagas. It is celebrated with sweets. swinging on swings, sisters doing nice things for brothers and snake worship.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naga_Panchami

mugwort Artemisia_vulgaris_-_Köhler–s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-016Today’s Plant is Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris. One of the Nine Herbs of the old Anglo-Saxon charm, this herb has many different uses from insect-repelling to flavoring beer. It’s a bad one for pregnant women to
ingest since it can induce abortion, since it’s a mild poison, but it’s used as a medicinal for various complaints and as a food. Some of the traditional folk uses are: magical protection, to repel insects, especially moths, from gardens., as a remedy against fatigue,  to protect travelers against evil spirits and wild animals.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_Herbs_Charmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mugwort – Feminine, Venus, Air/Earth – Magical uses: Clairvoyance, psychic dreams, astral projection, protection, strength. Place in the shoes for protection and to prevent fatigue on long journeys. The fresh leaves rubbed on a magick mirror or crystal ball will strengthen divinatory abilities. Mugwort is perhaps the most widely used Witches’ herb of all time.

Lammas LughnasadhThe shop opens at 11am! Summer hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Hecate's Brooch MoonWaning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/4 at 4:01am. Hecate’s Brooch 3-5 days before New Moon – Best time for Releasing Rituals. It’s the last few days before the new moon, the time of Hecate’s Brooch. This is the time that if you’re going to throw something out, or sweep the floors, or take stuff to Good Will, do it! Rid yourself of negativity and work on the letting go process. Release the old, removing unwanted negative energies, addictions, or illness. Do physical and psychic cleansings. Good for wisdom & psychic ability. Goddess Aspect: Crone Associated God/desses: Callieach, Banshee, Hecate, Baba Yaga, Ereshkigal, Thoth. Phase ends at the Dark on 7/2 at 4:01pm. 

070116 astroDistant Jupiter is moving ever lower in the west.
Astro StarIs your sky dark enough for you to see the Coma Berenices star cluster naked-eye? Just after the very end of twilight, spot Jupiter in the west. The cluster is above it by 25° about 2½ fists at arm’s length. Its brightest members form an inverted Y. The entire cluster is about 5° wide — a big, dim glow in a truly a moderately dark sky. It nearly fills a binocular view.
Astro Constellation PegasusThe last-quarter Moon (exact at 2:19 p.m. EDT) rises around 1 a.m. below the Great Square of Pegasus.
Astro uranusUranus (magnitude 5.9, in Pisces) is the east before dawn begins.

Goddess Month of Rosea runs from 6/13 – 7/10
Celtic Tree Month of Duir/Oak, Jun 10 – Jul 7 

Rune Runic Month 13 Feoh FehuRunic half-month of Fehu/ Feoh, 6/29-7/13 Important in the runic year cycle, today marks beginning of the first rune, Feoh, sacred to Frey and Freya (Freyja), the lord and lady often worshipped in modern Wicca. It is the half-month of wealth and success. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Sun in CancerSun in Cancer
Moon in GeminiMoon in Taurus enters Gemini at 4:44am
Saturn (8/13) Pluto (9/26), Pallas (10/17), Neptune (11/19) and Chiron (12/1) Retrograde
Color: Coral

Harvest 7/1-2

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©2016 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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motif,tree celtic duir oregon white oak garryCeltic Tree Month of Duir/Oak, Jun 10 – Jul 7 – The oak of myth and legend is the common oak (Quercus robur L.). It is sometimes called the great oak, which is a translation of its Latin name (robur is the root of the English word “robust”). It grows with ash and beech in the lowland forests, and can reach a height of 150 feet and age of 800 years. Along with ashes, oaks were heavily logged throughout recent millennia, so that the remaining giant oaks in many parts of Europe are but a remnant of forests past. Like most other central and northern European trees, common oaks are deciduous, losing their leaves before Samhain and growing new leaves in the spring so that the trees are fully clothed by Bealltaine. Common oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America, as are the similar native white oak, valley oak, and Oregon oak. Oaks are members of the Beech family (Fagaceae). Curtis Clark

duir oak Quercus_roburDuir – Oak Ogam letter correspondences
Month: May
Color: Black and Dark Brown
Class: Chieftain
Letter: D
Meaning: Security; Strength

duir celtic tree month Snowbowlaspensto study this month – Eadha – White Poplar or Aspen Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Silver White
Class: Shrub
Letter: E
Meaning: Problems; Doubts; Fears.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide    Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time       Feet    Sunset                                  Visible
F    1      Low   4:52 AM    -0.8   5:36 AM    Rise  3:28 AM      17
~     1     High  11:10 AM     5.8   9:04 PM     Set  6:10 PM
~     1      Low   4:31 PM     2.0
~     1     High  10:39 PM     8.5

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Nothing is so bad that some good may not come of it.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt Favorites – What is your favorite fairy tale? Write the reasons why you like it so much.

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Quotes 

~  A writer is congenitally unable to tell the truth and that is why we call what he writes fiction. – William Faulkner (1897-1962) US writer
~  It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It’s my partner. – Jonas Salk (1914-1995) US microbiologist
~  It is not peace we are seeking but meaning. – Lawrence Durrell
~  I am not very skeptical… a good deal of skepticism in a scientific man is advisable to avoid much loss of time, but I have met not a few men, who… have often thus been deterred from experiments or observations which would have proven servicable. – Charles Darwin

I guess from one point of view, life would be easier if we just had to get up and go to work everyday – we could pretty much be on auto-pilot and navigate through life without much effort. But what a waste of time and energy that would be. And how boring, too! Sure, spiritual growth takes effort – we need to make time to meditate, read, serve and take care of ourselves and the planet. But isn’t that the best part about this life? Once you get started on “the path” and see all the wonders that a spiritual life offers, you want to keep going. Sure, self-knowledge is difficult, messy, challenging, and inconvenient – but it is also the most magnificent and amazing gift that life has to offer.  – Lissa Coffey

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lughnasadh wheat border divLughnasadh Magick – Our Lady of the Harvest – School for the Seasons 8/13/04

I believe the Full Moon Festival of August is one of the oldest Goddess holidays that has been continually celebrated. At this turning point in the year, between the yang energy of summer solstice and the turning inward of the autumn, the Goddess comes into her own as protector, provider and mediator between the worlds.

Known by many names, at this time of the year she is revered as Artemis, Hecate and the Blessed Virgin Mary. All three are associated with the moon. All three are invoked for protection of the grain and the fruit which is so vulnerable to storms in these weeks before harvest. And all three are mediators between the worlds: Artemis in her origin as Goddess of the shamanistic cultures of the North, Hecate as the one who stands at the crossroads between life and death, and Mary as the mediator between Earth and Heaven.

This feast of the goddess was first celebrated in Greece at the full moon of Metageitnion (August 29th this year). In Erkhia, Artemis (as Hecate) was invoked, along with Kourotrophos, and beseeched for protection summer storms, which could flatten and destroy the crops.

In Rome, the Greek lunar festival honoring Artemis-Hecate was placed on the fixed solar calendar on August 13th and called the Nemoralia, also known as Diana’s Feast of the Torches. Roman women made torchlight processions to the temples of Diana and Hecate or visited the groves of Diana with their hunting dogs leashed. Hair-washing was an important ritual activity.

The story of the Virgin Mary’s Assumption (as she was dying, her body was lifted up into Heaven) was first recorded at the start of the 3rd century (about 150 years after the incident it relates). At the time, Mary was living at Ephesus, where she was living under the care of the apostle, John. Ephesus was one of the most famous sanctuaries of Artemis, the home of the famous statue of Artemis with many breasts, symbolizing the productive and nurturing powers of the earth. Mary, is also well known for her nurturing and protecting qualities (she is so tender-hearted she cannot deny any sincere request for help).

After witnessing her miraculous assumption, the story goes that the apostles declared this event should be commemorated on the thirteenth of Ab (the full moon of the Jewish lunar month that usually falls in August) “on account of the vines bearing bunches of grapes and on account of the trees bearing fruit, that clouds of hail, bearing stones of wrath, might not come, and the trees be broken, and the vines with their clusters.” Clearly Mary was seen as a protector of the crops and a mediator between the worlds.

As early as the tenth century, the aroma of herbs and flowers was associated with Mary’s victory over death, and people brought medicinal herbs and plants to church (periwinkle, verbena, thyme) to be incensed and blessed, bound into a sheaf and kept all year to ward off illness, disaster and death. In central Europe, August 15 was called Our Lady’s Herb Day. Gertrud Mueller Nelson’s mother kept this holiday alive by taking her daughters on walks, gathering wild grasses, a custom I’ve adopted in Seattle. It’s amazing how many kinds of wild grass grow on my city block.

This is the start of Our Lady’s Thirty Days, a tide which lasts until Harvest or Michaelmas and coincides with the astrological sign of Virgo, when animals and plants lose their harmful qualities and all food is considered wholesome. This period of benevolence also coincides with the seven weeks following the full moon of the Jewish month of Av, which are sometimes called the Weeks of Comfort. The readings for these weeks are comforting, promising peace and prosperity.

  • On the Nemoralia, August 13th, make washing your hair a ritual. This seems to be an act that was seen as a luxury after a period of fast and deprivation, perhaps even lack of water. So embellish your usual grooming rituals by adding perfume, candles, whatever seems indulgent to you.
  • To celebrate the Assumption, go for a walk on Sunday, August 15th. Observe and gather the abundance of the earth mother: the wild herbs, grains and edible plants that you find growing.
  • The full moon of Artemis-Hecate falls on August 29th this year. Celebrate by eating garlic or leaving an offering for Hecate at a crossroads.

 

Resources:
Nelson, Gertrud Mueller, To Dance With God: Family Ritual and Community Celebration, Paulist Press 1986
Urlin, Ethel L, Festivals, Holy Days and Saints’ Days: A Study in Origins and Survivals in Church Ceremonies and Secular Customs, republished by Gale Research 1979
Warner, Marina, Alone of All Her Sex: The Myth and the Cult of the Virgin Mary, Vintage 1983
Waskow, Arthur, Seasons of Our Joy: A Modern Guide to the Jewish Holidays, Beacon 1982
In the Library: Books on Bread
Bread for All Seasons, Beth Hensperger, Chronicle 1995
Although I haven’t tried any of the recipes in this book, I love to feast on the gorgeous color pictures and I appreciate the way Hensperger incorporates other fruits of the season into the bread, along with history and folklore about the way bread is featured in seasonal celebrations.

The Italian Baker, Carol Field, Harper Collins 1985
Carol Field is one of my favorite cookbook writers, particularly because she’s as knowledgeable about folklore as she about cooking. I’ve found her recipes (except for the one above) intimidating and complex, but the folklore is outstanding. This book is dense with recipes and with information about the role bread has played in Italian culture over time.

On the Web: Great Links
One of my readers, Jennifer, sent me a link to a reproduction of a beautiful old Book of Days from the 1800’s which has been posted on the website of the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s library.

I particularly appreciated this link because I spent many happy hours in the college library (at Reed College) poring over the pages of a similar edition of Chamber’s Book of Days, which definitely sparked my passion for these calendar customs.

Jennifer notes that the only way she’s found to print the pages is to import them one at a time into Microsoft Digital Imaging Software and size them to fit one page.

Another reader, Carmine, sent me a link to a great article called “For the Summer of It” by Ellen Goodman.

Flower of the Month: Dallying with Dahlias
The Flower of August is the dahlia. Click here to read more about the dahlia’s connection with the Aztec hummingbird-war god, Huitzilopochtli.

If you’d rather read my grumblings about the sorry state of flower folklore scholarship and ideas on creating your own floral calendar go to this page first.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness13419171_1435114486506134_8652253740507351794_n

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