Daily Stuff 7-25-16 Horn Fair

Hi, folks!

weather sun day red summerDespite the radio report of “partly cloudy”, that’s a clear blue sky and it’s *gorgeous*! For me, it’s a perfect temperature and enough of a breeze that you don’t heat up in the sun, even! It’s 62F and the wind is blowing at between 5 and 10 mph by the water, but only light breezes inland.

072216 Sidewalk2Yesterday was frustrating, but fun, anyway. We cleaned and set up in the morning and then I started cooking, but 1/2-way through the hot plate died! We ended up using the rusty old thing that I’ve had for decades. Then in the early evening in the last hour that the shop was open Tempus working on cleaning the dishes while I packed up and put things away. I got a long way on my footstool cover during the day in between cooking and the others worked on rag dolls and balls and Tempus cut another bone needle out and started working on it.

072216 Sidewalk1During the day we had a number of customers. Some stopped to chat, most were just browsing and I did a reading. Of course, that came in just as I was supposed to be cooking! 🙂

Today I have writing to do, after we’re done putting things away and getting pictures of what we were doing yesterday. I also thought I would show you the sidewalk art that Kaleb created for us last week. Unfortunately I got the pictures the next morning, after the dew drip line had started up, but the front of the shop is colorful!

thank thankful wise

760px-Blackface_ram_portraitToday’s Feast is the Horn Fair in Ebernoe in England. It’s a centuries-old fair, although it got revived about 150 years ago, so probably in a different form than in centuries past. It seems to be another fair that the English Revolution put on hiatus for awhile. It features a cricket match, and a roasted sheep whose horns are gifted to the winners. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebernoe_Horn_Fair

plant pic flower false lily of the valleyToday’s Plant is False Lily of the ValleyMaianthemum dilatatum. It was eaten as a poverty food, and the berries won’t hurt you, but they aren’t particularly tasty, either. It was more used as a medicinal by the indigenous peoples, although modern medicine doesn’t substantiate the native uses. The leaves were eaten in spring as a purgative, leaves were made into poultices for scrapes and cuts and the roots were pounded to make a medicine for sore eyes. I don’t know of any magickal uses except against sterility. More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maianthemum_dilatatum and here:  http://academic.evergreen.edu/projects/gardens/longhouse/monographs/false_lillyofthevalley.htm

Lammas LughnasadhThe shop opens at 11am! Summer hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Gibbous moonWaning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 8/2 at 6:12pm. Waning Gibbous Moon – Best time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. , Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 7/26 at 4:pm. 

astro meteorThe Delta Aquariid meteor shower, modest but very long-lasting, should most active for the next week or so. Under a very dark sky, you might see a dozen Delta Aquariids per hour between midnight and the first light of dawn. Each morning the light of the waning Moon will present less interference.
Astro SaturnSaturn (magnitude +0.2, in southern Ophiuchus) shines in the south 6° above fainter Antares at dusk, and about 13° upper left of brighter Mars. Near the middle of the Mars-Saturn-Antares triangle is the strange variable Delta Scorpii (Dschubba), the middle star of the nearly vertical row marking the Scorpion’s head. See our telescopic guide to Saturn in the June Sky & Telescope, page 48.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh)
Rune Runic Month 14 Ur UruzRunic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992 Runic half-month of Thurisaz/ Thorn/Thunor, 7/29-8/12 – Northern Tradition honors the god known to the Anglo-Saxons as Thunor and to the Norse as Thor. The time of Thorn is one of ascendant powers and orderliness. This day also honors the sainted Norwegian king, Olaf, slain around Lammas Day. Its traditional calendar symbol is an axe.

Sun in LeoSun in Leo
Moon in AriesMoon in Aries
Saturn (8/13) Pluto (9/26), Pallas (10/17), Neptune (11/19) and Chiron (12/1) Retrograde
Color: Lavender

Harvest 7/24-25

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©2016 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Holly Celtic Tree Month Tinne Ilex-aquifoliumCeltic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.
Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Celtic Tree Month Tinne hollyTinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

Yew Celtic Tree Month Tinne Ioho Taxus_brevifoliato study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
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Day        High      Tide    Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time       Feet    Sunset                                  Visible
M   25     High   4:48 AM     6.4   5:56 AM     Set 12:28 PM      73
~    25      Low  11:09 AM     0.2   8:49 PM
~    25     High   5:40 PM     7.4

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – If I hear a negative story, I say: “It may be true for them, but it is not true for me.”

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt What does this quote say to you? – Be kind; everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. — John Watson

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Quotes 

~  Foreign powers do not seem to appreciate the true character of our government.  – James K. Polk (1795-1849) US President (11)
~  No one is perfect… that’s why pencils have erasers. – Author Unknown
~  A life without love is like a year without summer. – Swedish Proverb
~  The superior man blames himself. The inferior man blames others. –  Sandy Diva

If the Moon be in Aries, Cancer, Virgo, Libra, or
Capricorn she is in places fit for Sowing; but if she
is placed in Aries or Taurus, she is then fit for
Planting only. – Leovitius

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lughnasadh wheat border divLughnasadh Magick – Lore

Crone’s Corner – Celebrating Lughnasadh, or Lammas  

Lughnassadh (pronounced “LOO-nahs-ah”) or Lammas, is one of the Greater Wiccan Sabbats and is usually celebrated on August 1st or 2nd, although occasionally on July 31st. The Celtic festival held in honor of the Sun God Lugh (pronounced “Loo”) is traditionally held on August 7th. Some Pagans celebrate this holiday on the first Full Moon in Leo. Other names for this Sabbat include the First Harvest Festival, the Sabbat of First Fruits, August Eve, Lammastide, Harvest Home, Ceresalia (Ancient Roman in honor of the Grain Goddess Ceres), Feast of Bread, Sabbat of First Fruits, Festival of Green Corn (Native American), Feast of Cardenas, Cornucopia (Strega), Thingtide and Elembiuos. Lughnassadh is named for the Irish Sun God Lugh (pronounced Loo), and variant spellings for the holiday are Lughnasadh, Lughnasad, Lughnassad, Lughnasa or Lunasa. The most commonly used name for this Sabbat is Lammas, an Anglo-Saxon word meaning “loaf-mass”.

The Lughnassadh Sabbat is a time to celebrate the first of three harvest celebrations in the Craft. It marks the middle of Summer represents the start of the harvest cycle and relies on the early crops of ripening grain, and also any fruits and vegetables that are ready to be harvested. It is therefore greatly associated with bread as grain is one of the first crops to be harvested. Wiccans give thanks and honor to all Gods and Goddesses of the Harvest, as well as those who represent Death and Resurrection.

This is a time when the God mysteriously begins to weaken as the Sun rises farther in the South, each day grows shorter and the nights grow longer. The Goddess watches in sorrow as She realizes that the God is dying, and yet lives on inside Her as Her child. It is in the Celtic tradition that the Goddess, in her guise as the Queen of Abundance, is honored as the new mother who has given birth to the bounty; and the God is honored as the God of Prosperity.

Symbols to represent the Lammas Sabbat include corn, all grains, corn dollies, sun wheels, special loaves of bread, wheat, harvesting (threshing) tools and the Full Moon. Altar decorations might include corn dollies and/or kirn babies (corn cob dolls) to symbolize the Mother Goddess of the Harvest. Other appropriate decorations include Summer flowers and grains. You might also wish to have a loaf of whole cracked wheat or multigrain bread upon the altar.

Deities associated with Lughnassadh are all Grain and Agriculture Deities, Sun Gods, Mother Goddesses and Father Gods. Particular emphasis is placed on Lugh, Demeter, Ceres, the Corn Mother and John Barleycorn (the personification of malt liquor). Key actions associated with Lammas are receiving and harvesting, honoring the Parent Deities, honoring the Sun Gods and Goddesses, as well as celebration of the First Harvest.

It is considered a time of Thanksgiving and the first of three Pagan Harvest Festivals, when the plants of Spring wither and drop their fruits or seeds for our use as well as to ensure future crops. Also, first grains and fruits of the Earth are cut and stored for the dark Winter months.

Activities appropriate for this time of the year are the baking of bread and wheat weaving – such as the making of Corn Dollies, or other God & Goddess symbols. Sand candles can be made to honor the Goddess and God of the sea. You may want to string Indian corn on black thread to make a necklace, and bake corn bread sticks shaped like little ears of corn for your Sabbat cakes. The Corn Dolly may be used both as a fertility amulet and as an altar centerpiece. Some bake bread in the form of a God-figure or a Sun Wheel .

It is customary to consume bread or something from the First Harvest during the Lughnassadh Ritual. Other actions include the gathering of first fruits and the study of Astrology. Some Pagans symbolically throw pieces of bread into a fire during the Lammas ritual.

The celebration of Lammas is a pause to relax and open yourself to the change of the Season so that you may be one with its energies and accomplish what is intended. Visits to fields, orchards, lakes and wells are also traditional. It is considered taboo not to share your food with others

Traditional Pagan Foods for the Lughnassadh Festival include homemade breads (wheat, oat and especially cornbread), corn, potatoes, berry pies, barley cakes, nuts, wild berries, apples, rice, roasted lamb, acorns, crab apples, summer squash, turnips, oats, all grains and all First Harvest foods. Traditional drinks are elderberry wine, ale and meadowsweet tea.

It is also appropriate to plant the seeds from the fruit consumed in ritual. If the seeds sprout, grow the plant with love and as a symbol of your connection to the Divine. A cake is sometimes baked, and cider is used in place of wine.

As Summer passes, Wiccans remember its warmth and bounty in the food we eat. Every meal is an act of attunement with Nature – From Miss Daney’s Folklore, Magic and Superstitions

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Things to Say When Caught Sleeping at Work

– “They told me at the blood bank this might happen.”
– “This is just a 15 minute power nap like they raved about in that time management course you sent me to.”
– “Whew! Guess I left the top off the Wite-Out. You probably got here just in time!”
– “I wasn’t sleeping! I was meditating on the mission statement and envisioning a new paradigm.”
– “I was testing my keyboard for drool resistance.”
– “I was doing a highly specific Yoga exercise to relieve work-related stress. Are you discriminatory toward people who practice Yoga?”
– “Darn! Why did you interrupt me? I had almost figured out a solution to our biggest problem.”
– “The coffee machine is broken.”
– “Someone must’ve put decaf in the wrong pot.”

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