Daily Stuff 10-21-16 Ursula

Hi, folks!

weather Cloud oceanThere’s some high wrinkly cloud with blue holes in it and then a layer of lower, greyish stuff at about 600 feet that veils and unveils the other. What sun there is barely casts shadows. The Bay was grey-brown dotted with herons, crows and gulls on the sandflats. There’s next to no wind. We got 7/10’s of an inch of rain yesterday, but very little since midnight. 60F

pine cone

pine cone

Yesterday was *really* busy during the day. We had folks in from Portland, Bend, SoCal, Kentucky and Idaho! We actually had more people buying than browsing during the day, too. Tempus spent some time in back, trying to get things put away (it’s getting crowded) while I worked up front.

Eventually he headed for the house to work up there and to take a bunch of stuff to storage. Amy stopped by for Sewing for a couple of hours. Once Tempus was back he offloaded and we decided that since the papers were running late I needed to be at the apartment last night instead of at the shop, so we did that and he took off for the paper route.

pine bit and mushrooms

pine bit and mushrooms

I worked on sorting some more things out then crawled into bed with my embroidery and a book. He got in at around 5:30, so he’s pretty tired and cranky today. I got enough sleep to get by on, so I’m doing a lot better.

He’s going to be at the house and storage again today. I’m going to be at the shop. It’s all the same sorting and putting away stuff that’s been going on for months…. I do want to try to get some more herbs put away, though.

A Ken Gagne photo of spindrift in Yachats from 10/5/15.

100515 Ken Gagne Yachats SPindrift

220px-Rhubarb_flower

Today’s Plant is Rhubarb, Rheum rhabarbarum. Best known as “pie plant” or in strawberry and rhubarb jam this is a wonderful and nutritious stalk vegetable, that has been legally counted as a fruit, because of its uses. The roots have been used as a laxative for thousands of years, and the stalks, while strong-tasting when uncooked and with no sugar, are delicious in sauces, pies, jellies, juice and so on, but the leaves are poisonous. It is very easy to grow since the roots will over-winter, even if the stalks die back and it’s one of the earliest vegetables to be harvestable. – Feminine, Venus Earth. – Wear a dried piece to help with stomach or gut pain and general protection. The pie served to a mate helps to maintain fidelity and is an aphrodisiac, especially when combined with strawberries.

200px-StaUrsulaCepleanuToday’s feast is that of St. Ursula who was martyred for refusing the advances of a Hun prince….supposedly. She may be a Christianized version of a bear/moon goddess from far earlier in history or even the goddess Freya. “Her legend, probably unhistorical, is that she was a princess who, at the request of her father King Dionotus of Dumnonia in south-west Britain, set sail to join her future husband, the pagan governor Conan Meriadoc of Armorica, along with 11,000 virginal handmaidens. After a miraculous storm brought them over the sea in a single day to a Gaulish port, Ursula declared that before her marriage she would undertake a pan-European pilgrimage. She headed for Rome with her followers and persuaded the pope, Cyriacus (unknown in the pontifical records), and Sulpicius, bishop of Ravenna, to join them. After setting out for Cologne, which was being besieged by Huns, all the virgins were beheaded in a massacre. The Huns’ leader shot Ursula dead, in about 383 (the date varies).” – Quoted from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Ursula

Samhain PentacleThe shop opens at 11am! Fall hours are 11am-6pm Thursday through Monday, but closing time will continue to follow sunset over the next couple of months. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Gibbous moonWaning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 10/30 at 10:38am. Waning Gibbous MoonBest time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. – Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 10/22 at 12:14pm. 

webvic16_oct21ev-537x360A planet-laden panorama.
Astro SaturnSaturn and Antares now form a more compact, right triangle with bright Venus low in the southwest at dusk, as shown above.
Astro uranusAstro neptuneUranus (magnitude 5.7, in Pisces) and Neptune (magnitude 7.8, in Aquarius) are well up after dark in the east and southeast, respectively. Info and finder charts.

Goddess Month of Hathor runs from 10/3 – 10/30
Celtic Tree Month Gort/Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27 – (Hedera helix L.)
Rune Runic Month 20 Wunjo WynRunic half-month of Wunjo/WynOctober 13-28 – Wyn represents joy, the rune being the shape of a weather vane. The month represents the creation of harmony within the given conditions of the present.

Sun in LibraSun in Libra
Moon in CancerMoon in Cancer
Neptune (11/19) Chiron (12/1), Ceres (12/9) and Uranus (12/29) Retrograde
Color: Rose

Planting 10/20-22

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©2016 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Ivy Gort Celtic tree month Hedera_helixGort – Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27 – Gort – (GORT), ivy – Ivy (Hedera helix L.) is also a vine, growing to 30 m (100 feet) long in beech woods and around human habitations, where it is widely planted as a ground cover. Ivy produces greenish flowers before Samhain on short, vertical shrubby branches. The leaves of these flowering branches lack the characteristic lobes of the leaves of the rest of the plant. Like holly, ivy is evergreen, its dark green leaves striking in the bare forests of midwinter. Ivy is widely cultivated in North America. It is a member of the Ginseng family (Araliaceae).

motif plant herb Ivy sprig gort celtic tree monthGort – Ivy Ogam letter correspondences
Month: September
Color: Sky Blue
Class: Chieftain
Letter: G
Meaning: Take time to soul search or you will make a wrong decision.

Honeysuckle Gort cletic tree month Lonicera_ciliosato study this month Uilleand – Honeysuckle Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Yellow-white
Class: Peasant
Letter: P, PE, UI
Meaning: Proceed with caution.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide    Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time       Feet    Sunset                                  Visible
F   21     High   5:38 AM     6.8   7:40 AM     Set  1:39 PM      71
~    21      Low  11:10 AM     2.8   6:21 PM    Rise 11:34 PM
~    21     High   5:01 PM     7.8

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – I will worry about it tomorrow!

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt What do you think? – Do you think it is necessary to have alcohol at a party in order to have a good time?

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Quotes  

~  A coward is incapable of exhibiting love; it is the prerogative of the brave. – Gandhi
~  Depend on the rabbit’s foot if you will, but remember: it didn’t work for the rabbit. – R. E. Shay
~  Nurture your mind with great thoughts; heroes are made by believing – Disraeli
~  A vision without action is called a daydream; but then again, action without a vision is called a nightmare – Jim Sorensen

Love

Love means to learn to look at yourself
The way one looks at distant things
For you are only one thing among many.
And whoever sees that way heals his heart,
Without knowing it, from various ills.
A bird and a tree say to him: Friend.
Then he wants to use himself and things
So that they stand in the glow of ripeness.
It doesn’t matter whether he knows what he serves:
Who serves best doesn’t always understand. – Czeslaw Milosz (Collected Poems)

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Samhain border divSamhain Magick – Earth Magic and Druid Lore ~ A Series for the Season ~Hearth, Home and Samhain

By the warmth of the hearth, we gather round, for inspiration and ceremony. It brings to us, a sense of spiritual kinship and values of home. Storyteller’s faces glow by the light of the fire blazing beneath the cauldron filled with spicy aromas. Music floats and soothes the soul and heals the heart. The turning of the wheel once again, reminds us of a New Year dawning. Our love and respect for the earth told in tales of the past and once again brought forth by Druids and kin alike. On Hallow’s eve, the jack-o-lanterns glow in the windows to ward off evil spirits. The moon shines brightly on those conversing with loved ones and our ancestors passed on. The veil is thin between worlds at this time, and sitting by the fire brings light to many things in our home and hearth.

October 31 is when many pagans, druids and most witches celebrate the greater Sabbat commonly called Halloween or Samhain, pronounced sowen or soween. Some other names for Samhain include Hallowe’en, Halloween, Hallowtide, Shadow Fest, Harvest Home, Day of the Dead, Feast of the Dead, Spirit Night, November Eve, Ancestor Night, Apple Fest, All Hallow’s Eve, Old Hallomas, Hallowmass, Martinmass, Shadowfest, and All Soul’s Day.

This was the time the Celtic people came to terms with death and pondered on their own destinies. This day is considered the highest holy days. Samhain (Summer’s End), is the most widely used Celtic name for this holiday. Rituals on this night include remembering and honoring our loved ones and our ancestors.

One tradition is called the “dumb supper.” This is a feast with all the wonderful foods from the last harvest. A place is set for our departed family members. You might set photos or other mementos upon the table and tell stories remembering times shared with those who have passed over.

During this time, many will ask their ancestors’ spirits to assist in whichever form of divination they choose. Some common and oldest forms used are tarot, fire, the pendulum and mirror. You might also try a dark bowl or cauldron filled with liquid, crystals, runes, or reading tea leaves. Guided meditations or astral travel for the purpose of past life regression and/or for the purpose of knowing or learning something specific from one’s ancestors, are very successful on this night.

In many parts of England, it was believed that the ghosts of all persons who were destined to die in the coming year could be seen walking through the graveyards at midnight on Samhain. Many of the ghosts that people thought they saw were said to be evil. For protection, jack-o-lanterns with horrible candle-lit faces were carved out of pumpkins and carried as lanterns to scare away the evil spirits.

This is the time in the Celtic year the gods drew near to Earth. Many sacrifices and gifts were offered up in thanksgiving for the harvest. Personal prayers were lifted up and trinkets representing wishes and ills were thrown into the fires. At the end of the ceremonies, brands were lit from the great fire of Tara to re-kindle all the home fires of the tribe. As they received the flame that marked this time of beginnings, the people felt a sense of the kindling of new dreams, projects and hopes for the year to come.

After the bonfires had burned out the ashes were sprinkled over the fields to protect them during the winter months and this also made the soil rich for the next years harvest to grow.

It is said that lighting a new orange candle at midnight on Samhain and allowing it to burn until sunrise will bring one good luck.

The apple is the Celtic tree of regeneration and eternal life also representing the sun, the source of all life, love, healing and immortality. Apple orchards were especially protected as sacred ground and apples were offered to the dead and buried at Samhain as food for those waiting to be reborn. Burning apple blossoms can be used for incense pleasing the spirits.

Brighid or Bridget is the Patroness of the Hearth and Goddess of the household fire. In the evening the woman of the household would smoor or stoke the fire to keep it going for the night, by adding wood and covering it low to keep it just smoldering until morning. The fires should be kept going and prayers lifted, asking for the protection of Brighid on all who reside there. She is perhaps the most well known of all the Celtic goddesses. Her following was so strong that the Catholic church exalted her as
St. Brigit, the foster-mother of Christ, and kept her festival as the feast of St. Brigit. Bridget is sometimes seen as a triple goddess, the maiden, mother and crone that symbolize the cycle of life. She is the goddess of the hearth, fertility, healing, herbalism, the arts, midwifery, agriculture, inspiration, poetry, divination, prophecy, smith craft, animal husbandry, love, and protection. Correspondences for Bridget include the direction north, blackberries, fire, wells, milk, the waxing moon, lambs, and the heart. Other names for Bridget are, “Bright Arrow,” “Bright One,” “Powerful One,” and “High One.” Bridget was a Sun Goddess, and the legend of her birth is that she was born at sunrise, and a tower of bright flame burst from her forehead that reached from Earth to the Otherworld. Her fire is so bright that she survived mass spiritual transformation and lives on today watching over her children all over the world. Imbolc, a festival in her honor is celebrated February first or second, the turning of winter, heralding the coming of spring. Fires are lit at sundown and feasts are shared with her bright presence.

Late October was the nut harvest for the ancient Celts, and also the time for slaughtering animals that would supply meat for the long winter. Druids tallied their livestock and mated their ewes for the coming spring. Fruits, vegetables, and grains were also put away for winter storage.

The Celts put all their fires out on Samhain so that the tribes could relight them from the Druidic fires that were kept burning in the Middle of Ireland, at Usinach. In Ireland and Scotland, the custom of dousing the home fire and relighting it from the festival bonfire has been carried into modern times.

The Druids believed that the Lord of Death gathered all the spirits of the dead who had been made to enter the bodies of animals as punishment for their sins and redistributed them, on Hallowe ‘en, the last day of the Celtic year. It was also
believed that the spirits of the dead came back to their old haunts at this time. Fires were lit to guide them home and to frighten away evil spirits.

A farmer sometimes accompanied by his herds would circle the boundaries of each field to ensure prosperity for the New Year. This was a reversion to the calendar of the Druids who considered that Samhain was the first day of the New Year.

On Samhain, an old custom was to light a fire on the household hearth which would burn continuously until the first day of the following spring.

It is said that if you go to a crossroads at Halloween and listen to the wind, you will learn all the most important things that will befall you during the next year.

Cerridwen is often portrayed as a hag stirring a cauldron, the typical image of Halloween. Cerridwen is one of the goddesses most associated with shape shifting. She is often seen as a sow, for her attribute of fertility and as the Moon and grain goddess
who possesses the great cauldron of knowledge. Cerridwen is the goddess of death, fertility, regeneration, inspiration, enchantment, divination, herbs, science, poetry, knowledge, and shapeshifting. Correspondences for Cerridwen include the direction west, pigs, hens, cauldrons, wolves, vervain, acorns, and the dark moon.

The cauldron holds the great brew of as yet to come wisdom, which is plainly available to anyone who thirsts after it. It also holds the nourishment of the soul and possesses the property of granting wisdom to any who drink from it. The cauldron remains important in all Celtic and Druidical workings.

The Hazel tree is the Bard or minstrel poets, tree of wisdom, promoting fertility, poetry, and knowledge. It’s a favorite wood of diviners and dowsers. Druid wands are made from hazel wood, planted in nines around sacred wells. The nuts honor all knowledge to whoever eats them and are eaten before using divination. Rain is invoked by beating the earth with hazel branches. The hazel is the most typical Celtic tree because of its legendary position at the heart of the Otherworld, which is where the nine magic hazelnut trees hang over the Well of Wisdom and drop their purple nuts into the water where the Salmon of Knowledge and Inspiration eats them. Irish tales say poets and seers “gain nuts of Wisdom,” a metaphor for a heightened state of consciousness, when they drink a brew made from the hazelnuts that have been said to cause hallucinations. There’s numerous reference in Irish literature to drinking “hazel mead.” Scottish Druids ate the nuts for prophetic power.

Legends say, the hazel, apple, and hawthorn trees are often found at the border of worlds where magic has been said to happen.

Young lovers roasted hazelnuts over the fire at Samhain, called “Nut Crack Night.” If the nut held together, their relationship would stay steady, but if it burst apart, then the love may not last or it could be a “heated” relationship. This connection between hazelnuts and love is very ancient. Country folklore has always linked hazelnuts with fertility. New brides were given the nuts much like the wives tale of rice being thrown after the wedding, to indicate fertility.

There are many tales and stories of old and wise, these are just a few. Remember to cherish your loved ones and those who have passed from this life into another. Reflect on the New Year and count your many blessings.
About the Author – Fran Hafey is a Reiki Practioner, writer, Spiritual Counselor and teacher. She provides guidance and  inspiration via her Website, groups and newsletter on the World Wide Web.To read more of her articles visit the Author’s Website: http://Mystickblue.com
Fran is currently working on publishing her own books about love, inspiration, magic and nature stories for Children of all ages.
This article may be freely published so long as the author’s Bylines and resource box remain intact.
Fran Hafey, Reiki Practioner, Spiritual Consultant E-Mail: Mystifh@earthlink.net Please send me a note and link if you publish. Thanks!

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Late Night FunnyChristmas is right around the corner which means any day now, Donald Trump should be tweeting out an insult to Santa. “He’s fat and old and he uses illegal laborers. – Jimmy Fallon

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