Daily Stuff 2-7-17 Snow Festival

Hi, folks!

Featured Photo by Ken Gagne

Waves tide

First Minus Tide of the cycle at 4:06 PM of -0.4 feet.

butterfly motif bugThe sky is mottled grey and white and the distances obscured by rain showers. It’s brighter than yesterday’s early hours by a long shot! 46F and no wind. Small Craft for Winds Advisory, Gale Watch …again…. We should have a bit of a break in the weather today, but rain again tomorrow.

butterfly motif bugYesterday felt *very* long. Mostly Tempus and I are both still dragging from the flu, but we’re up and moving again, at least. More “shifting” happened at the shop, but I’m hoping I’m going to be able to make a larger dent today as Jay is going to be here for awhile.

butterfly motif bugThe sun came out later in the afternoon. At one point a fairy rain came pouring down and I went outside to look at the rainbow. It was lovely! …rain was awfully cold, though…

butterfly-motif-bug-06Class went well last night. We read through the Imbolc ritual, so we’ve “Turned the Wheel” appropriately and worked more on Lesson 2.

butterfly-motif-bug01Today I’m hoping to do a batch of pickled eggs and get another batch of stuff moved. Maybe with Jay here I can even start some inventory. We have the paper route tonight, as well.

Photo by Ken Gagne of “Jonathan”, 1/23/17 Yachats

012317-ken-gagne

plant partridge berryToday’s plant is Partridge Berry, (Mitchella repens) – Caution: There are similar-looking berries that are deadly. Don’t wildcraft unless you’re certain. Common Names:  Squaw Vine.  Description:  Evergreen.  Woodland Creeper.  This vine flowers in Spring with fragrant white trumpet-shaped flowers. The vine grows about 6 to 12″ high, creeping through moss around old tree stumps. The leaves are thick, very shiny, and heart-shaped.  In the Fall, bright scarlet berries form that last all winter, unless they are eaten by birds and deer.  They are tasteless, but can serve as a survival food. Partridge berries grow wild in bogs and barrens. They store, cook, and freeze perfectly and they have a beautiful, deep red colour. Used as a women’s medicine to promote easy childbirth (don’t use until the last minute as another use is an abortifacient!) sometimes in tea or a jelly form and also for urinary disorders. – Feminine, Earth, Saturn, – Carry leaves in a sachet of green cloth to help with “female trouble” of all sorts, except during pregnancy. Add a piece of red jasper, if possible. In the last week of pregnancy carry dried flowers or berries in a red cloth sachet to ease childbirth. Carry dried berries in orange cloth to ease mucous discharges and to help with nervous irritability.

800px-SapporoFestival8The Sapporo Snow Festival is neither ancient, nor religious, but it’s *fun*! It started in 1950 and has grown to a big event that brings sculptors from all over to participate. This pictures is some of the ice sculptures. More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sapporo_Snow_Festival  Pictures here:  http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Sapporo_Snow_Festival

 motif Imbolc PentacleThe shop is closed for remodeling. Winter Hours are 11am-5pm Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Gibbous MoonWaxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 2/10 at 4:33pm.  Waxing Gibbous Moon – From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Keywords for the Gibbous phase are: analyze, prepare, trust. It is the time in a cycle to process the results of the actions taken during the First Quarter. During this phase you are gathering information. Give up making judgments; it will only lead to worry. Your knowledge is incomplete. Laugh. Analyze and filter. LOOK WITHIN. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, but in the uncommitted phase, the Warriors – Associated God/desses: Dion, Dionysius, Venus, Thor. Phase ends at the Full on 2/9 at 4:33am.

webvic17_feb05ev-354x360Leo regulus astroAfter dark look due east, not very high, for twinkly Regulus. Extending upper left from it is the Sickle of Leo, a backward question mark. “Leo announces spring,” goes an old saying. Actually, Leo showing up in the evening announces the cold, messy back half of winter. Come spring, Leo will already be high.
Astro marsMars (magnitude +1.1) is the faint “star” upper left of Venus. They’re 6° apart this week, soon to start widening. In a telescope Mars is just a tiny fuzzblob 5 arcseconds wide.

Goddess Month of Bridhe, runs from 1/23 – 2/19
Celtic Tree Month of Luis/Rowan, Jan 21-Feb 17, Luis (LWEESH)
Rune Runic Month 03 Elhaz AlgizRunic half-month of Elhaz/Algiz, from 1/28-2/11. This half month: optimistic power, protection and sanctuary. Runic half-month of Sowulo/ Sigel, 2/12-26 It represents the power of the force of good throughout the world and is the harbinger of victory and ascendancy over darkness.

Sun in AquariusSun in Aquarius
Moon in CancerMoon in Cancer
Jupiter (6/9), Vesta (3/7) Retrograde
Color: Red

Planting 2/7-8

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©2016 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month Rowan berries, LuisCeltic Tree Month of Luis/Rowan, Jan 21-Feb 17, Luis (LWEESH)/rowan – The rowan, or mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia L.) is related to servceberries. The red berries were historically used to lure birds into traps, and the specific epithet aucuparia comes from words meaning “to catch a bird”. Birds are also responsible for dispersing the seeds. Rowans thrive in poor soils and colonize disturbed areas. In some parts Celtic Tree Month Rowan Luis Rowan Sitka Sorbus_sitchensisof Europe they are most common around ancient settlements, either because of their weedy nature or because they were planted. Rowans flower in May. They grow to 15 m (50 feet) and are members of the Rose family (Rosaceae). They are cultivated in North America, especially in the northeast.

plant motif rowan treeLuis – Rowan Ogam letter correspondences
Month: December
Color: Grey and Red
Class: Peasant
Letter: L
Meaning: Controlling your life; Protection against control by others.

Plant Tree Apple Quert LuisQuert – Apple Ogam letter correspondences to study this month
Month: None
Color: Green
Class: Shrub
Letter: Q
Meaning: A choice must be made

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide    Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time       Feet    Sunset                                  Visible
Tu   7      Low   2:49 AM     3.1   7:27 AM     Set  4:36 AM      78
~     7     High   8:54 AM     8.6   5:34 PM    Rise  2:25 PM
~     7      Low   4:06 PM    -0.4
~     7     High  10:37 PM     6.6

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – I believe that this greatness, can be found in anyone, if one looks with the right perspective and from one’s inner sanctum.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Personal taste – You have an extra $100,000K to give away; you cannot spend it on yourself. What would you do with the money?

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Quotes  

~  Let everything happen to you. Beauty and terror. Just keep going. No feeling is final. – Rainer Maria Rilke
~  Affirmation – Stare at yourself, unflinchingly, and ask, “What do I choose today? Freedom, or the oppression of my soul?” – Thorn
~  For those who fight for it, life has a flavor that the protected will never know. – African Proverb
~  I am easily satisfied with the very best. – Winston Churchill

Freedom’s Awakening

The day will come when we are all truly freed
Like a great wise oak that grew from a seed
Or the joy heard from witches at the midnight hour
Full of peace, love, happiness, and endless power.

When we gaze at a sunrise all purple and red
Or the pureness of innocence seen through children instead
We feel the energy and take nothing for granted
We see courage and determination planted.

Deep in the mind of a pretty soul
All the pain, hurt, and suffering will soon take it’s toll
But surely in deed we all will be freed
And live by our rede long and wise we will lead
Like a tree that grew from a seed.

This poem is submitted by Mariah age 15. Please send feedback to Jeralynn at jeraly7@aol.com I am her mom and a member of this group. I am also very proud of her. All feedback is appreciated and welcome.

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Pentacle of Elements Magick – Cupid and Psyche

Full Article in Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupid_and_Psyche

There were once a king and queen, rulers of an unnamed city, who had three daughters of conspicuous beauty. The youngest and most beautiful was Psyche, whose admirers, neglecting the proper worship of the love goddess Venus, instead prayed and made offerings to her. It was rumored that she was the second coming of Venus, or the daughter of Venus from an unseemly union between the goddess and a mortal. Venus is offended, and commissions Cupid to work her revenge. Cupid instead scratches himself with his own dart, which makes any living thing fall in love with the first thing it sees. As soon as Cupid scratches himself he falls deeply in love with Psyche and disobeys his mother’s order to make Psyche fall in love with something hideous.

Although her two humanly beautiful sisters have married, the idolized Psyche has yet to find love. Her father suspects that they have incurred the wrath of the gods, and consults the oracle of Apollo. The response is unsettling: the king is to expect no human son-in-law, but rather a dragon-like creature who harasses the world with fire and iron and is feared by even Jupiter and the inhabitants of the underworld.

Psyche is arrayed in funeral attire, conveyed by a procession to the peak of a rocky crag, and exposed. Marriage and death are merged into a single rite of passage, a “transition to the unknown”. Zephyr the West Wind bears her up to meet her fated match, and deposits her in a lovely meadow (locus amoenus), where she promptly falls asleep.

The transported girl awakes to find herself at the edge of a cultivated grove (lucus). Exploring, she finds a marvelous house with golden columns, a carved ceiling of citrus wood and ivory, silver walls embossed with wild and domesticated animals, and jeweled mosaic floors. A disembodied voice tells her to make herself comfortable, and she is entertained at a feast that serves itself and by singing to an invisible lyre.

Although fearful and without sexual experience, she allows herself to be guided to a bedroom, where in the darkness a being she cannot see makes her his wife. She gradually learns to look forward to his visits, though he always departs before sunrise and forbids her to look upon him, and soon she becomes pregnant.

Violation of trust

Psyche’s family longs for news of her, and after much cajoling, Cupid, still unknown to his bride, permits Zephyr to carry her sisters up for a visit. When they see the splendor in which Psyche lives, they become envious, and undermine her happiness by prodding her to uncover her husband’s true identity, since surely as foretold by the oracle she was lying with the vile winged serpent, who would devour her and her child.

One night after Cupid falls asleep, Psyche carries out the plan her sisters devised: she brings out a dagger and a lamp she had hidden in the room, in order to see and kill the monster. But when the light instead reveals the most beautiful creature she has ever seen, she is so startled that she wounds herself on one of the arrows in Cupid’s cast-aside quiver. Struck with a feverish passion, she spills hot oil from the lamp and wakes him. He flees, and though she tries to pursue, he flies away and leaves her on the bank of a river.

There she is discovered by the wilderness god Pan, who recognizes the signs of passion upon her. She acknowledges his divinity (numen), then begins to wander the earth looking for her lost love.

Psyche visits first one sister, then the other; both are seized with renewed envy upon learning the identity of Psyche’s secret husband. Each sister attempts to offer herself as a replacement by climbing the rocky crag and casting herself upon Zephyr for conveyance, but instead is allowed to fall to a brutal death.

Wanderings and trials

In the course of her wanderings, Psyche comes upon a temple of Ceres, and inside finds a disorder of grain offerings, garlands, and agricultural implements. Recognizing that the proper cultivation of the gods should not be neglected, she puts everything in good order, prompting a theophany of Ceres herself. Although Psyche prays for her aid, and Ceres acknowledges that she deserves it, the goddess is prohibited from helping her against a fellow goddess. A similar incident occurs at a temple of Juno. Psyche realizes that she must serve Venus herself.

Venus revels in having the girl under her power, and turns Psyche over to her two handmaids, Worry and Sadness, to be whipped and tortured. Venus tears her clothes and bashes her head into the ground, and mocks her for conceiving a child in a sham marriage. The goddess then throws before her a great mass of mixed wheat, barley, poppyseed, chickpeas, lentils, and beans, demanding that she sort them into separate heaps by dawn. But when Venus withdraws to attend a wedding feast, a kind ant takes pity on Psyche, and assembles a fleet of insects to accomplish the task. Venus is furious when she returns drunk from the feast, and only tosses Psyche a crust of bread. At this point in the story, it is revealed that Cupid is also in the house of Venus, languishing from his injury.

At dawn, Venus sets a second task for Psyche. She is to cross a river and fetch golden wool from violent sheep who graze on the other side. These sheep are elsewhere identified as belonging to the Sun. Psyche’s only intention is to drown herself on the way, but instead she is saved by instructions from a divinely inspired reed, of the type used to make musical instruments, and gathers the wool caught on briers.

For Psyche’s third task, she is given a crystal vessel in which to collect the black water spewed by the source of the rivers Styx and Cocytus. Climbing the cliff from which it issues, she is daunted by the foreboding air of the place and dragons slithering through the rocks, and falls into despair. Jupiter himself takes pity on her, and sends his eagle to battle the dragons and retrieve the water for her.

Psyche and the underworld

The last trial Venus imposes on Psyche is a quest to the underworld itself. She is to take a box (pyxis) and obtain in it a dose of the beauty of Proserpina, queen of the underworld. Venus claims her own beauty has faded through tending her ailing son, and she needs this remedy in order to attend the theatre of the gods (theatrum deorum).

Psyché aux enfers (1865) by Eugène Ernest HillemacherCharon rows Psyche past a dead man in the water and the old weavers on shore

Once again despairing of her task, Psyche climbs a tower, planning to throw herself off. The tower, however, suddenly breaks into speech, and advises her to travel to Lacedaemon, Greece, and to seek out the place called Taenarus, where she will find the entrance to the underworld. The tower offers instructions for navigating the underworld:

The airway of Dis is there, and through the yawning gates the pathless route is revealed. Once you cross the threshold, you are committed to the unswerving course that takes you to the very Regia of Orcus. But you shouldn’t go emptyhanded through the shadows past this point, but rather carry cakes of honeyed barley in both hands,[14] and transport two coins in your mouth.

The speaking tower warns her to maintain silence as she passes by several ominous figures: a lame man driving a mule loaded with sticks, a dead man swimming in the river that separates the world of the living from the world of the dead, and old women weaving. These, the tower warns, will seek to divert her by pleading for her help: she must ignore them. The cakes are treats for distracting Cerberus, the three-headed watchdog of Orcus, and the two coins for Charon the ferryman, so she can make a return trip.

Everything comes to pass according to plan, and Proserpina grants Psyche’s humble entreaty. As soon as she reenters the light of day, however, Psyche is overcome by a bold curiosity, and can’t resist opening the box in the hope of enhancing her own beauty. She finds nothing inside but an “infernal and Stygian sleep,” which sends her into a deep and unmoving torpor.

Reunion and immortal love

Meanwhile, Cupid’s wound has healed into a scar, and he escapes his mother’s house by flying out a window. When he finds Psyche, he draws the sleep from her face and replaces it in the box, then pricks her with an arrow that does no harm. He lifts her into the air, and takes her to present the box to Venus.

He then takes his case to Jupiter, who gives his consent in return for Cupid’s future help whenever a choice maiden catches his eye. Jupiter has Mercuryconvene an assembly of the gods in the theater of heaven, where he makes a public statement of approval, warns Venus to back off, and gives Psyche ambrosia, the drink of immortality,[15] so the couple can be united in marriage as equals. Their union, he says, will redeem Cupid from his history of provoking adultery and sordid liaisons.[16]Jupiter’s word is solemnized with a wedding banquet.

With its happy marriage and resolution of conflicts, the tale ends in the manner of classic comedy[17] or Greek romances such as Daphnis and Chloe. The child born to the couple will be Voluptas (Greek Hedone ‘Ηδονή), “Pleasure.”

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Q – Why did Grandma put roller skates on her rocking chair? A – Because she wanted to rock and roll!

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