Daily Stuff 5-17-17 Dea Dia

Hi, folks!

57F, little wind, bright sun and blue sky and there are tourists in shorts…and parkas…. running around town! Newport got over 8 feet of rain over the winter. I think we actually got a touch more than that, but there’s an article about the damage to the roadways that mentioned that.

Yesterday was unusual in that I got the newsletter out from home. That takes a little finagling, but I think I’m going to try to get it set up to do that more often. I don’t want to do it on days that the shop is open, but we were doing chores before we came in.

I harvested rue and added some dirt to my sorrel bucket, since that’s really packed down with the rain. I spent time checking over a lot of the other plants and weeding while Tempus was getting trash into the cans for tomorrow’s pick-up.

After we came in I set out to clean up the week’s mail and Tempus was working on that sewing kit box. It’s so close to being finished! Long’s about 4pm I heard from the traveling son that he was 3 1/2 hours out. We spent some time talking to him until he lost signal up near the pass. By then I was cleaning up the spot where we usually sit, so kiddo can snooze there when he needs to, and sorting out some of my projects, tidying up.

I made more of the Chinese soup for supper and then we sat and waited. …and the he called saying his GPS had changed its mind and decided he had another 1 1/2 hours. 😦 So Tempus and I had our soup and put his by.

..and then he showed up about 1/2 an hour after Tempus got to Newport, but Amor and I talked right up until Tempus got back to the shop at 3:30! Amor has a tiny dog, Pooka, that is all wiggles and doggie kisses, and I got liberally smeared with dog tongue a couple of times! Amor and pup went to sleep and Tempus and I finished the route. …well, I don’t remember anything after the middle of Waldport! Apparently I went soundly to sleep and only woke enough when we got home to get into bed!

I didn’t wake until 3:30, either. Wow! So, we’re just having coffee. I’ve been enthusiastically greeted by a tiny dog that is all wriggling cute, hugged by my boy and handed coffee, but my sweetie of a Tempus who is now getting greeted by the puppy. 🙂

motif tree shore pine Pinus_contorta_28263

Today’s plant is Shore Pine, Pinus contorta, var. contorta. It’s a tough tree well suited to stand up to the coastal winds. More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinus_contorta  More on the coastal ecology here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon_Coast#Terrestrial_ecology  Pine’s magick is: Male, Mars, Air – Healing, fertility, protection, money, burn to cleanse a house, changing negative energy to positive, or use boughs for purification baths/sweats.

plant poppy wheatToday’s Feast is that of Dea Dia, a fertility goddess of Rome, whose worship was so old, even then, that the Carmen Arvale, Her sacred chant, wasn’t understood! She was probably an aspect of Ceres, in some way. Her priests were the Fratres Arvales (Brothers of the Fields) who were from Patrician families (traditionally the emperor was one) who were responsible for the worship of the “closer in” guardian deities of flocks, fields, home and ancestors. More on the priests here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fratres_Arvales on the Lares here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lares and on the chant here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmen_Arvale

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 5/25 at 12:4pm. Waning Gibbous Moon Best time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. – Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 5/18 at 5:33pm. 

Summer Milky Way preview: For much of the spring at mid-northern latitudes, the Milky Way lies right down all around the horizon after dark, completely out of sight. But as night grows late, watch low in the east to northeast. There the rich Cygnus stretch of the Milky Way starts rising into view by around 11 p.m. It will rise earlier and higher every week.
Saturn (magnitude +0.2, in Sagittarius) rises around 10 or 11 p.m. and glows highest in the south well before the first light of dawn. Redder Antares (magnitude +1.0) twinkles 18° to Saturn’s right in the early-morning hours.

Goddess Month of Hera runs from 5/16 – 6/12
Celtic Tree Month of Huath/Hawthorn, May 13 – Jun 9 
Runic half-month of Inguz/Ing, 5/14-5/28 – Male consort of Nerthus, the Earth Mother, Ing is god of the hearth. This time of year expresses potential for abundant growth. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, p. 70.

Sun in Taurus
Moon in Aquarius
Jupiter (6/9), Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28) Retrograde
Color: WHite

Harvest 5/17-18

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Huath/Hawthorn, May 13 – Jun 9 – I am fair among flowers – Color: Purple – Class: Peasant – Letter: H – Meaning: Being held back for a period of time – Hawthorn – Like willows, hawthorns have many species in Europe, and they are not always easy to tell apart. All are thorny shrubs in the Rose family (Rosaceae), and most have whitish or pinkish flowers. The common hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) and midland hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata (Poiret) DC.) are both widespread. They are common in abandoned fields and along the edges of forests. Both are cultivated in North America, as are several native and Asiatic hawthorns. Curtis Clark

Huathe – Hawthorne Ogam letter correspondences
Month: April
Color: Purple
Class: Peasant
Letter: H
Meaning: Being held back for a period of time

to study this month – Ur – Heather and Mistletoe Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Purple
Class: Heather is Peasant; Mistletoe is Chieftain
Letter: U
Meaning: Healing and development on the spiritual level.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
W   17     High   4:43 AM     6.3   5:46 AM    Rise  1:21 AM      71
~    17      Low  11:52 AM     0.3   8:40 PM     Set 11:27 AM
~    17     High   6:46 PM     5.9

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Negative thinking produces negative experiences.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What does this quote say to you? – The older I get, the greater power I seem to have to help the world; I am like a snowball — the further I am rolled the more I gain. – Susan B. Anthony

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Quotes  

~  Whenever you create something, you invariably end up creating yourself. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  Whoever gossips to you will gossip about you. – Spanish Proverb
~  With his ears let him listen, and look with his eyes; thus each wise man spies out the way. – Norse Adage
~  Without labor nothing prospers. – Sophocles

Shekhinah

My sister my sister…

My heart breaks
As your energy wanes

We celebrate you.
Your life, your love.

But our Mother awaits, She holds her arms out.
She waits…to wrap you in Her loving arms.
There is a sweetness that She offers.

Our beloved sister dances her path to the end.
She smiles, her spirit soars.
Our hearts break… yet we celebrate.
Shekihinah our bodhisattva…will return. – Blessed Be!   GrannyMoon Aug. 5 2007 

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Magick – Recipes

Pickled Beets and Eggs – Sweet beets pickled in apple cider vinegar make a stellar brine for pickling hard-boiled eggs, making for an irresistible, nutritious snack.

  • ACTIVE:25 MIN
  • TOTAL TIME:3 HR 30 MIN
  • SERVINGS:4
  • TIME :PLUS OVERNIGHT PICKLING

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 small red beets (about 3/4 pound), scrubbed
  • 1 cup raw, unfiltered apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons whole black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 small red onion, cut into thin wedges
  • 4 hard-cooked large eggs, peeled
  • 6 dill sprigs

HOW TO MAKE THIS RECIPE

  1. Preheat the oven to 450°. Wrap the beets in foil and roast for about 1 hour, until tender. When cool enough to handle, slip off the skins and quarter the beets.
  2. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, combine the vinegar, water, garlic, sugar, peppercorns and salt. Bring to a boil and simmer over moderately high heat, stirring, until the sugar is dissolved, about 5 minutes. Let the pickling liquid cool to warm, about 15 minutes.
  3. Layer the beets, onion, eggs and dill in a heatproof 1-quart glass jar and cover with the pickling liquid. Let stand at room temperature for 2 hours. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

MAKE AHEAD – The pickled beets and eggs can be refrigerated for up to 1 week.
CONTRIBUTED BY KAY CHUN PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2013

What Are Esquites and How To Make Them

A Favourite Snack All Over Mexico. Nancy Lopez-McHugh BY NANCY LOPEZ-MCHUGH Updated 08/23/16

Fresh, succulent ears of corn are at their best in these late summer and early autumn months. There are many ways to prepare corn, and each country that grows and consumes it typically has a long list of their traditional corn recipes. Today I’d like to share with you one, of the many, flavourful ways we eat fresh corn in Mexico. This dish is called esquites, and translates to “toasted corn” from the the Aztec Nahuatl language. But esquites are so much more than just toasted corn, it is among the most popular and loved snack in Mexico.

If you travel to Mexico you will undoubtedly come across a stand or street vendor selling warm esquites being served in white styrofoam cups. (If you live in the US, you can find esquites in neighbourhoods with a large Mexican immigrant population.) The vendors are always present in neighbourhood corners as well as at markets, local festivals, and countrywide holiday celebrations. The surefire way of finding the best esquites, and grilled corn on the cob, another Mexican favourite, is by following the crowds to the vendors. Choose one that has at least a couple of people waiting to be served or with people already spooning the delicious kernels into their mouths.

The recipe, ingredients, and topping options vary not only from one Mexican state to another, but also between families. Once the corn kernels are stripped from the cobs they can be sautéed with either oil, or lard or butter, and with an array of seasonings. Some people like to add broth to the kernels and stew them a while longer. When it comes to serving the esquites, it is typically inside a cup. If you are purchasing them from a vendor it will most likely be served in a styrofoam cup and with a plastic spoon. They may ask you if you want broth and which toppings; The toppings can be lime wedges, grated or crumbled cheese, mayonnaise, and ground red chile powder. All of these choices will greatly depend on where in Mexico you’re eating esquites and how they are prepared in that particular region. The commonality among the regions will always be the love and enjoyment the Mexican people (including this Mexican girl) get from eating cupfuls of esquites.

If you do a quick internet search for esquites you’ll see it being referred to as a salad, but it really isn’t one. Another name is “Mexican corn in a cup”, which is an accurate description of how they are served and another name we have for esquites in Mexico, elote en vaso. Regardless, the snack is fantastic and surely one that will quickly become a favourite of yours too.

What You’ll Need

  • 4 ears of corn (I prefer the white corn to the yellow variety, but use what is locally available to you)
  • 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter
  • 30 grams or 1/3 cup of white onion, finely chopped
  • 2 serrano chiles, finely chopped
  • one sprig of epazote or one large pinch of dried epazote leaves (read about epazote it here)
  • 2 cups or 470 ml of water or chicken broth, (the amount needs to be just enough to just cover the corn)
  • mayonnaise (use regular not light or the salad dressing type)
  • queso fresco or cotija cheese, or in a pinch replace with grated parmesan cheese
  • ground red chile powder
  • fresh limes

What Are Esquites and How To Make Them – A Favourite Snack All Over Mexico. Nancy Lopez-McHugh BY NANCY LOPEZ-MCHUGH Updated 08/23/16

Fresh, succulent ears of corn are at their best in these late summer and early autumn months. There are many ways to prepare corn, and each country that grows and consumes it typically has a long list of their traditional corn recipes. Today I’d like to share with you one, of the many, flavourful ways we eat fresh corn in Mexico. This dish is called esquites, and translates to “toasted corn” from the the Aztec Nahuatl language. But esquites are so much more than just toasted corn, it is among the most popular and loved snack in Mexico.

If you travel to Mexico you will undoubtedly come across a stand or street vendor selling warm esquites being served in white styrofoam cups. (If you live in the US, you can find esquites in neighbourhoods with a large Mexican immigrant population.) The vendors are always present in neighbourhood corners as well as at markets, local festivals, and countrywide holiday celebrations. The surefire way of finding the best esquites, and grilled corn on the cob, another Mexican favourite, is by following the crowds to the vendors. Choose one that has at least a couple of people waiting to be served or with people already spooning the delicious kernels into their mouths.

The recipe, ingredients, and topping options vary not only from one Mexican state to another, but also between families. Once the corn kernels are stripped from the cobs they can be sautéed with either oil, or lard or butter, and with an array of seasonings. Some people like to add broth to the kernels and stew them a while longer. When it comes to serving the esquites, it is typically inside a cup. If you are purchasing them from a vendor it will most likely be served in a styrofoam cup and with a plastic spoon. They may ask you if you want broth and which toppings; The toppings can be lime wedges, grated or crumbled cheese, mayonnaise, and ground red chile powder. All of these choices will greatly depend on where in Mexico you’re eating esquites and how they are prepared in that particular region. The commonality among the regions will always be the love and enjoyment the Mexican people (including this Mexican girl) get from eating cupfuls of esquites.

If you do a quick internet search for esquites you’ll see it being referred to as a salad, but it really isn’t one. Another name is “Mexican corn in a cup”, which is an accurate description of how they are served and another name we have for esquites in Mexico, elote en vaso. Regardless, the snack is fantastic and surely one that will quickly become a favourite of yours too.

What You’ll Need

  • 4 ears of corn (I prefer the white corn to the yellow variety, but use what is locally available to you)
  • 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter
  • 30 grams or 1/3 cup of white onion, finely chopped
  • 2 serrano chiles, finely chopped
  • one sprig of epazote or one large pinch of dried epazote leaves (read about epazote it here)
  • 2 cups or 470 ml of water or chicken broth, (the amount needs to be just enough to just cover the corn)
  • mayonnaise (use regular not light or the salad dressing type)
  • queso fresco or cotija cheese, or in a pinch replace with grated parmesan cheese
  • ground red chile powder
  • fresh limes

How to Make It

  1. Shuck the ears of corn, making sure to remove all of the fibbers or silk. (Watch this videoon how to do it quickly.) Use a sharp knife to carefully slice off the corn kernels — be extra careful as you can easily cut yourself. Set the corn kernels aside.
  2. In a pot melt the butter, then add the onion and sauté until soft and translucent. Next add the serrano bit and sauté for three minutes before adding the corn kernels.
  3. Saute, and stir often, for about eight minutes just to lightly toast the corn kernels. Next add the epazote and a pinch of fine sea salt and stir the ingredients well before pouring in the water or broth. Over medium-low heat allow the esquites to simmer until the liquid is reduced by half — but don’t let it dry out. Turn the heat off and gather the toppings: mayonnaise, cheese, ground red chile, and limes.
  4. To serve scoop some equites with a little bit of broth into each cup, top with a dollop of mayonnaise, a large sprinkling of cheese, a big dusting of ground red chile and a lime wedge. Of course the amounts are up to your personal preference — in fact, you may completely leave off the toppings if desired. Enjoy!
  5. Shuck the ears of corn, making sure to remove all of the fibers or silk. (Watch this video on how to do it quickly.) Use a sharp knife to carefully slice off the corn kernels — be extra careful as you can easily cut yourself. Set the corn kernels aside.
  6. In a pot melt the butter, then add the onion and sauté until soft and translucent. Next add the serrano bit and sauté for three minutes before adding the corn kernels.
  7. Saute, and stir often, for about eight minutes just to lightly toast the corn kernels. Next add the epazote and a pinch of fine sea salt and stir the ingredients well before pouring in the water or broth. Over medium-low heat allow the esquites to simmer until the liquid is reduced by half — but don’t let it dry out. Turn the heat off and gather the toppings: mayonnaise, cheese, ground red chile, and limes.
  8. To serve scoop some equites with a little bit of broth into each cup, top with a dollop of mayonnaise, a large sprinkling of cheese, a big dusting of ground red chile and a lime wedge. Of course the amounts are up to your personal preference — in fact, you may completely leave off the toppings if desired. Enjoy!

Copycat Panda Express™ Orange Chicken – Make your own takeout and stay in tonight! This copycat dinner nails everyone’s favorite Orange Chicken. With just a bit of spice, a little sweet and a lot of sticky, this crunchy, saucy chicken is insanely delish. – Brooke McLay

  • Prep20MIN
  • Total40MIN
  • Servings4

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup orange juice concentrate
  • 3tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1cup brown sugar
  • 1/2teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2boneless skinless chicken breasts, diced
  • 3eggs, beaten
  • 1 1/2cups cornstarch
  • 3/4teaspoon salt
  • 1/2teaspoon fresh ground pepper
  • 1cup coconut oil (for frying)
  • 2cups vegetable oil (for frying)

Steps

  1. Preheat oven to 425°F. In a pot, combine orange juice concentrate, soy sauce, vinegar, sugar and red pepper flakes. Heat until boiling. Set aside.
  2. In a large wok or skillet, heat coconut oil and vegetable oil to medium.
  3. Add beaten eggs to a large bowl. In another bowl, combine cornstarch, salt and pepper. Dip chicken pieces in egg mixture, then in cornstarch, twice, finishing with a cornstarch layer.
  4. Fry the battered chicken pieces in hot oil until golden brown. Transfer to a 9 x 9-inch baking dish.
  5. Drizzle sauce over chicken. Bake for 15-20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes to coat. Serve over sticky rice, if desired.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Larry’s barn burned down, and Susan, his wife, called the insurance company.  Susan said, “We had that barn insured for $50,000 and I want my money.  The agent told her that it didn’t work that way, that they would ascertain the value of the old barn, and provide her with a new one of comparable worth. After a short silence Susan said, “I would like to cancel the policy on my husband.”

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