Daily Stuff 7-9-17 Caprotiana

Hi, folks!

Minus Tide at 7:48 AM of -1.0 feet. House Capuchin Project Day Noon to 6pm.

The sky is a blue bowl, richer color at the center, pale around the edges with decorations of small high clouds. There was a little mist hanging on the beach as we came over the bridge, but I’ve been watching it lift and dissipate for the last 10 minutes or so. It’s 62F with only a light breeze.

Yesterday was pretty busy. We had people for Herbs and worked on a number of different techniques, which also got the leek buckets planted, herbs prepped and put away and the eggshell fertilizer put on the bulbs out front.

Tempus headed back to the apartment mid-afternoon so that he could shift some things for our landlady. We have to move a few of her things up to the garage this month, so we can put the piano in the apartment. It has to leave where it is.

We had people in pretty steadily all day. I ended up sewing at my desk, since there was no one in for the workshop, just stitching my way through some more simple pincushions.

Our last customers came in around 9pm last night and we closed up and headed home and went thud…..

It had clouded up in the late afternoon, so we couldn’t see the Moon when we were heading home. Friday night She was bright and beautiful, and then during the night I woke to see Moonlight pouring into the sunroom a couple of times and bright sunshine this morning.

We watered plants this morning and I had the first strawberry from the plant by the apartment for this summer.

The Duckmeister passed on her pic of a gosling and baby bunny snuggled up together at her place.

feast 0214 Juno_sospita_pushkinToday’s Feast is quoted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caprotinia )

“The Caprotinia, or feasts of Juno Caprotina, were ancient Roman festivals which were celebrated on July 9, in favour of the female slaves. During this solemnity they ran about, beating themselves with their fists and with rods. None but women assisted in the sacrifices offered at this feast.
Kennet says the origin of this feast, or the famous Nonae Caprotinae or Poplifugium, is doubly related by Plutarch, according to the two common opinions. First, because Romulus disappeared on that day, when an assembly being held in the Palus Caprae (“Goats’-Marsh”), suddenly a storm broke, accompanied with terrible thunder, and other unusual disorders in the air (see Plutarch’s Life of Numa). The common people fled all away to secure themselves; but, after the tempest was over, could never find Romulus, their king.
Or, else, from Caprificus, a wild fig-tree, because, in the Gallic war, a Roman virgin, who was prisoner in the enemy’s camp, got up into a wild fig-tree, and holding out a lighted torch toward the city, gave the Romans a signal to fall on; which they did with such good success, as to obtain a considerable victory.”

plant herb flower Solidago_canadensis_20050815_248Today’s plant is Goldenrod, Solidago Canadensis. A good browse plant, although not shade-tolerant, it is one of the first plants to colonize burned-off areas. In Fukishima it has taken over the rice fields near the wrecked nuclear plant. – Feminine, Venus, Air – Wear a piece of goldenrod to see your future love. Hold a piece in the hand and it will direct you to things you’ve lost or buried treasure. If it blooms by your door without being planted, good fortune will follow. It’s also used in money spells and has the property of survival. Wiki article here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidago_canadensis

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/8 at 9:07pm. Full Moon – The day of the day before and day after the true Full Moon. “And better it be when the moon is full!”! Prime time for rituals for prophecy, for spells to come to fruition, infusing health and wholeness, etc. A good time for invoking deity. FRUITION Manifesting goals, nurturing, passion, healing, strength, power. Workings on this day are for protection, divination. “extra power”, job hunting, healing serious conditions Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. God/dess Aspect: Mother/Abundance/Kingship – – Associated God/desses: Danu, Cerridwen, Gaia, Aphrodite, Isis, Jupiter, Amon-Ra. Phase ends on 7/10 at 9:07am. Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am. 

Venus starts the week above Aldebaran and ends the week closer to Aldebaran’s upper left.
The Big Dipper, still high in the northwest after dark, is turning around to “scoop up water” through the evenings of summer and early fall.
Mercury (roughly magnitude –0.5) is very low in west to west-northwest about a half hour after sunset.

Goddess Month of Rosea runs from 6/13 – 7/10
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Half-month of Fehu/ Feoh, 6/29-7/13 Important in the runic year cycle, today marks beginning of the first rune, Feoh, sacred to Frey and Freya (Freyja), the lord and lady often worshipped in modern Wicca. It is the half-month of wealth and success. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Capricorn
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Yellow

Planting 7/9

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
Su   9     High  12:46 AM     7.6   5:41 AM     Set  6:18 AM      99
~     9      Low   7:48 AM    -1.0   9:02 PM    Rise  9:22 PM
~     9     High   2:20 PM     6.2
~     9      Low   7:39 PM     2.6

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – The wildflowers of happiness are often found in the woods of difficulty.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What is? – What is something that made your mother happy?

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Quotes  

~  In Iroquois society, leaders are encouraged to remember seven generations in the past and consider seven generations in the future when making decisions that affect the people. – Wilma Mankiller
~  Isn’t it strange that we talk least about the things we think about most? – Charles A. Lindbergh
~  Learning is the discovery that something is possible. – Fritz Perls
~  leghlaHchu’be’chugh mIn lo’laHbe’ taj jej (Klingon Proverb: A sharp knife is nothing without a sharp eye)

SOMEWHERE IN MY SOUL
A thought went up my mind to-day
That I have had before,
But did not finish, – some way back,
I could not fix the year.

Nor where it went, nor why it came
The second time to me,
Nor definitely what it was,
Have I the art to say.

But somewhere in my soul, I know
I’ve met the thing before;
It just reminded me – ’twas all –
And came my way no more. – By Emily Dickinson

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Lughnasadh Magick – Lore

Seasons of the Witch – Ancient Holidays – And some not so ancient too!

The Celts celebrate this festival from sunset August 1 until sunset August 2 and call it Lughnasad after the God Lugh. It is the wake of Lugh, the Sun-King, whose light begins to dwindle after the summer solstice. The Saxon holiday of Lammas celebrates the harvesting of the grain. The first sheaf of wheat is ceremonially reaped, threshed, milled and baked into a loaf. The grain dies so that the people might live. Eating this bread, the bread of the Gods, gives us life. If all this sounds vaguely Christian, it is. In the sacrament of Communion, bread is blessed, becomes the body of God and is eaten to nourish the faithful. This Christian Mystery echoes the pagan Mystery of the Grain God.

Grain has always been associated with Gods who are killed and dismembered and then resurrected from the Underworld by the Goddess-Gods like Tammuz, Osiris and Adonis. The story of Demeter and Persephone is a story about the cycle of death and rebirth associated with grain. Demeter, the fertility Goddess, will not allow anything to grow until she finds her daughter who has been carried off to the Underworld. The Eleusinian Mysteries, celebrated around the Autumn Equinox, culminated in the revelation of a single ear of corn, a symbol to the initiate of the cyclical nature of life, for the corn is both seed and fruit, promise and fulfillment.

You can adapt the themes of Lughnasad and Lammas to create your own ceremony for honoring the passing of the light and the reaping of the grain.

Honoring the Grain God or Goddess

Bake a loaf of bread on Lammas. If you’ve never made bread before, this is a good time to start. Honor the source of the flour as you work with it: remember it was once a plant growing on the mother Earth. If you have a garden, add something you’ve harvested–herbs or onion or corn–to your bread. If you don’t feel up to making wheat bread, make corn bread. Or gingerbread people. Or popcorn. What’s most important is intention. All that is necessary to enter sacred time is an awareness of the meaning of your actions.

Shape the dough in the figure of a man or a woman and give your grain-person a name. If he’s a man, you could call him Lugh, the Sun-King, or John Barleycorn, or the Pillsbury Dough Boy, or Adonis or Osiris or Tammuz. Pauline Campanelli in The Wheel of the Year suggests names for female figures: She of the Corn, She of the Threshing Floor, She of the Seed, She of the Great Loaf (these come from the Cyclades where they are the names of fertility figures), Freya (the Anglo-Saxon and Norse fertility Goddess who is, also called the Lady and the Giver of the Loaf), the Bride (Celtic) and Ziva or Siva (the Grain Goddess of, the Ukraine, Hungary, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia).

Feast

Like all holidays, Lammas calls for a feast. When your dough figure is baked and ready to eat, tear him or her apart with your fingers. You might want to start the feast with the Lord’s Prayer, emphasizing the words “Give us this day our daily bread.” The next part of the ceremony is best done with others. Feed each other hunks of bread (or gingerbread people or popcorn), putting the food in the other person’s mouth with words like “May you never go hungry,” “May you always be nourished,” “Eat of the bread of life” or “May you live forever.” Offer each other drinks of water or wine with similar words. As if you were at a wake, make toasts to the passing summer, recalling the best moments of the year so far.

Corn Dolly

Another way to honor the Grain Goddess is to make a corn doll. This is a fun project to do with kids. Take dried-out corn husks and tie them together in the shape of a woman. She’s your visual representation of the harvest. As you work on her, think about what you harvested this year. Give your corn dolly a name, perhaps one of the names of the Grain Goddess or one that symbolizes your personal harvest. Dress her in a skirt, apron and bonnet and give her a special place in your house. She is all yours till the spring when you will plant her with the new corn, returning to the Earth that which She has given to you.

Food for Thought

Lammas is a festival of regrets and farewells, of harvest and preserves. Reflect on these topics alone in the privacy of your journal or share them with others around a fire. Lughnasad is one of the great Celtic fire-festivals, so if at all possible, have your feast around a bonfire. While you’re sitting around the fire, you might want to tell stories. Look up the myths of any of the grain Gods and Goddesses mentioned above and try re-telling them in your own words.

Regrets: Think of the things you meant to do this summer or this year that are not coming to fruition. You can project your regrets onto natural objects like pine cones and throw them into the fire, releasing them. Or you can write them on dried corn husks (as suggested by Nancy Brady Cunningham in Feeding the Spirit) or on a piece of paper and burn them.

Farewells: What is passing from your life? What is over? Say good-bye to it. As with regrets, you can find visual symbols and throw them into the fire, the lake or the ocean. You can also bury them in the ground, perhaps in the form of bulbs which will manifest in a new form in spring.

Harvest: What have you harvested this year? What seeds have your planted that are sprouting? Find a visual way to represent these, perhaps creating a decoration in your house or altar which represents the harvest to you. Or you could make a corn dolly or learn to weave wheat. Look for classes in your area which can teach you how to weave wheat into wall pieces, which were made by early grain farmers as a resting place for the harvest spirits.

Preserves: This is also a good time for making preserves, either literally or symbolically. As you turn the summer’s fruit into jams, jellies and chutneys for winter, think about the fruits that you have gathered this year and how you can hold onto them. How can you keep them sweet in the store of your memory?

School of the Seasons – http://www.schooloftheseasons.com/lammas.html
Feast of Old Greek Deities Aphrodite and Eros–Day to honor love and passion – 8/1 eve to 8/2 eve
For More Lammas Info – Click Here – http://www.wilsonsalmanac.com/lammas.html
Remember the ancient ways and keep them sacred

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Sniglet – Any word which should be in the dictionary but isn’t.

Hereoglyph – A little stick figure on a mallmanac (see below) that tells you where you are in a mall because you can’t tell by yourself because there is no face on it. (Often the words “You Are Here” occur at the bottom of the hereoglyph)

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