Daily Stuff 7-16-17 Hijri Calendar

Hi, folks!

Possible Aurora Borealis tonight around midnight. Go outside and look up! House Capuchin’s monthly Potluck is this afternoon, so expect interesting cooking smells and possibly odd outfits running in and out today.

Bright, blue, sunny sky again! Almost don’t need weather reports, these days….. Temps are ranging from 61-68F. Winds from almost nothing to not quite 10mph. Lovely summer day on the coast!

Yesterday was busy, pretty much all day. Early in the day it was all paperwork. I’m trying to get the OCPPG 2017 stuff up and running. It looks like I might have some help on the updates on places to stay and such. I’m hoping, anyway.

Late in the day Tempus and I were cooking. We set up a vegetable stew, a burgundy beef, and a pea pottage that kinda turned into barley pottage…. not sure why 1 cup of barley outdid 3 cups of peas! We also got the mushrooms cleaned for pickled

mushrooms, but didn’t have all the materials so that had to wait for this morning.

Tempus and I had a few chores after we got home, but were up early this morning and at the shop by 9:30 fearing that I would have to “rescue” the beef. It’s a little dry, but otherwise ok. Next step is to do the mushrooms and then we get a break, but we’ll be open on time from the look of it and be open all day, even if I get distracted.

do not grow old einstein wise

Islamic Calendar

Today’s Feast is the anniversary date of the Hijri Calendar, the main religious calendar for Islam. Year 1 is our 622CE. It’s a lunar calendar, which means that the dates for the hajj and Ramadan and other celebrations shift around, compared to the solar-based calendars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamic_calendar

Today’s plant is Western Red Cedarpic plant tree Thuja_plicata Arborvitae plicata, which is not a cedar at all, but an Arborvitae. Arborvitae comes from the Latin for “tree of life” and coincidentally, native Americans of the West coast also address the species as “long life maker”. “Western Redcedar has an extensive history of use by the indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast, from Oregon to southeast Alaska. Some northwest coast tribes refer to themselves as “people of the redcedar” because of their extensive dependence on the tree for basic materials. The wood has been used for constructing housing, totem poles, and crafted into many objects, including masks, utensils, boxes, boards, instruments, canoes, vessels, and ceremonial objects. Roots and bark were used for baskets, ropes, clothing, blankets and rings.” Wiki article  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thuja_plicata – Masculine, Sun. Fire, – to enhance banishing of ill health and bad dreams. Burn for this purpose and purification and psychic power. Make a sachet for love or courage.

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am. Waning Gibbous Moon – Best time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. – Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 7/16 at 12:26pmWaning Crescent MoonBest time for beginning introspective magicks that are more long term (full year cycle) A good time for beginning knot magicks to “bind up” addictions and illness (finish just before the Tide Change of Dark to New) and “tying up loose ends” God/dess aspects – Demeter weeping for her Daughter, Mabon, Arachne Tyr. Phase ends on 7/18 at 2:46pm. 

Venus starts the week above Aldebaran and ends the week closer to Aldebaran’s upper left.
The Big Dipper >>> , still high in the northwest after dark, is turning around to “scoop up water” through the evenings of summer and early fall.
Last-quarter Moon (exact at 3:26 p.m. EDT). The Moon rises tonight around 2 a.m. daylight-saving time and is high in the southeast by Monday’s dawn.
Mercury (magnitude 0) is very low in west about a half hour after sunset. Good luck.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Waning Quarter at 12:26pm.
Moon in Aries enters Taurus at 10:04pm.
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Orange

Harvest 7/15-16

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
Su  16      Low  12:28 AM     1.7   5:47 AM    Rise 12:39 AM      61
~    16     High   6:05 AM     5.5   8:57 PM     Set  1:37 PM
~    16      Low  12:16 PM     1.0
~    16     High   6:54 PM     7.1

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Fear is an ironic thing….Although we are its recipients; we are also its creators…”

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Personal experience – How much was gas the last time you filled up?

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Quotes  

~  Whatever stage of life you find yourself in, now is the time to discover your power, take control of your life, and find peace. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  Who in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle. – Lewis Carroll
~  You don’t have to be singing about love all the time in order to give love to the people. You don’t have to keep flashing those words all the time. – Jimi Hendrix
~  As life is action and passion, it is required of a man that he should share the passion and action of his time, at the peril of being not to have lived. – Oliver Wendell Holmes

this is the garden: colours come and go,
frail azures fluttering from night’s outer wing
strong silent greens serenely lingering,
absolute lights like baths of golden snow. –e e cummings (1894–1962)

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Lughnasadh Magick –

Make a Corn Dolly to save for next Imbolc. Activities taken from “Green Witchcraft” by Anne Moura (Aoumiel)

Double over a bundle of wheat and tie it near the top to form a head. Take a bit of the
fiber from either side of the main portion and twist into arms that you tie together in front of the dolly. Add a small bouquet of flowers to the “hands,” and then you can decorate the dolly with a dress and bonnet (the dress and bonnet may be made out of corn husks if you wish, or and cotton material is fine too).

Corn Dolly – (For Lughnasadh)http://members.aol.com/ivycleartoes/corndoll.html

Materials:

  • Wheat straw, hollow straws, or raffia
  • Yarn or string
  • Small amount of cloth
  • Optional: A receptacle to display finished product, such as a basket or a horn of plenty
  • Optional: Decorations for the dolly or her display case

Directions:

If you’re using real wheat straw, you should get it when it is almost ripe but not totally dry yet. It should still be green at the bottom. Dry for a day, hung up, and then cut off the leaves and the head of the wheat below its first joint. When you use it it should be soaked before you try to bend it, for about half an hour. If you don’t have access to the real thing, the best craft material to use is raffia, and it doesn’t need to be moistened. It is easily found at the craft stores and resembles flattened straw.

There are a lot of ways to make a dolly out of the material, but here is just one easy way. First, take a large clump–maybe fifteen to twenty-five strands–and cut it so that it is about a foot and a half long. This will be the main body of the dolly. Fold it over in half. If it seems too long right now to be the size of dolly you want, you should cut it, because it is not going to get any shorter during the process. Now, where the stalks are folded is going to be the top of the dolly’s head. Take the string or yarn and tie it around the entire bundle about an inch and a half down from the top; that tie will be the mark of her neck.

Before you tie off the section that makes her body, you’ll need to make arms. This is easy; take more of your stalks and make a longer but thinner bundle–four to six stalks ought to do it–and fold them over. Tie off at the ends and cut the looped end so it is frayed just like the other side. The little frays represent her hands. Stick the arm bundle into the main bundle right under the neck, and then tie off the main bundle under the arms. That way they cannot slip out the bottom but can still be moved side to side or diagonally shifted.

At this point the bottom of the main bundle is frayed and splayed out a bit like a skirt. This is the simplest form of corn dolly, and it can now be considered finished if all you need is a very basic doll for your purpose. However, you can of course take a few extra steps, especially if this is to be ornamental rather than just ritually used.

You may want to make your corn dolly a dress. It is easy to cut a small piece of material–use a color or pattern that matches the season or a country print–and cut it in sort of an hourglass shape. Make a hole for the head at the center of the hourglass, and pull it over her head, then tie at the waist. The sides will be open but it doesn’t much matter since it’s just for effect. If you like you can even make a smaller version to make her an apron.

Also, a nice touch is giving her wheat stalk or raffia hair. Of course, for hair you can use any material, but we’ll take it for granted that you are not making the dolly to be professional-looking, it is a natural craft, so it is more likely that using the same material as you used for the rest of her body will be most appropriate. For hair, take a few strands of straw and loop them again; when looped it should be as long as you want her hair to be on either side. You’ll put it through the slightly closed loop made by her head. If you want this to be really easy, you may want to thread the hair piece in before tying it up, like you did with the arms. Otherwise it’s still possible but you may have trouble forcing it in. In any case, thread it through the head-hole and open it up on either side, then bring it up on top of her head and tie it in a double knot. You can then leave it loose if it looks nice, or give her a braid on either side. Then it is up to you how you dress her up; some nice touches are giving her a necklace, like a twig star or a string bracelet, or you can give her a bouquet of seasonal dried flowers for her hand. Use your imagination. But it is not considered part of the traditional craft to give her a face.

The corn dolly makes a nice addition to a basket of fallen leaves or pinecones, or a wall-mounted horn of plenty with dried flowers or wheat stalks (with the heads on) protruding from behind her.

Ritual use:

This could be the same dolly used in other crafts, such as the dolly for Brigit’s Bed. If that is the case, keep these other rituals and their purposes in mind as she has come to another spoke on the wheel. If this dolly was created just for this Sabbat, it can be placed on the altar during ritual and used to represent the harvest; if you have gone the simple route and not dressed it up, it is appropriate to use it as if it is the sacrifice for the harvest, and buried outside with any other libations from the ritual. It can instead be kept and hung up in the kitchen during the season and through the winter, where it can be buried or converted to a Spring symbol when the winter is past.

CORNHUSK DOLLS

-Corn husks, fresh or dried, about 6-8 pieces.
-String
-Cotton balls, about 4
-Scraps of cloth, yarn, beads
-pipe cleaners (optional)
Note: If you are using dried husks, soak them in water to soften them. Fresh husks need no special preparation

Step 1: Take a strip of husk and place a few cotton balls in the middle, twisting and tying it with string to make a head.

Step 2: Make some arms by folding another husk and tying it near each end to make hands. Slip the arms between the husks that extend under the head. Tie the waist with string.Arrange enough husks around the figure’s waist so that they overlap slightly. Tie them in place with string.

Step 3: Fold the husks down carefully. For a woman wearing a long skirt, cut the husks straight across at the hem. to make a man, divide the skirt in two and tie each half at the ankles. Let the figure dry completely

Step 4: You can leave you figure as is, or give it a face, hair, or even some fancier clothes. Use a fine-tipped marker to draw facial features. Glue some fuzzy yarn on for hair. Add some tiny beads for buttons, and bits of fabric for aprons or vests. A pipe cleaner staff or cane will help the man stand upright.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Mike’s Girlfriend

After directory assistance gave me my boyfriend’s new telephone number, I dialed him — and got a woman.
“Is Mike there?” I asked.
“He’s in the shower,” she responded.
“Please tell him his girlfriend called,” I said and hung up.
When he didn’t return the call, I dialed again. This time a man answered. “This is Mike,” he said.
“You’re not my boyfriend!” I exclaimed.
“I know,” he replied. “That’s what I’ve been trying to tell my wife for the past half-hour.”

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