Daily Stuff 7-17-17 Anastasia

Hi, folks!

Wicca 101 tonight, Lesson 7.

It’s a lovely, sunshiny day! The marine layer is pulled back and there aren’t even any clouds over the coast range. It’s a bit breezier than it’s been. Wind at 13 with 17mph gusts here in town and the evergreens were sighing as I left the apartment. 77% humidity in Bayshore, but even a little bit inland that drops to the 50% range. 61F. Can it get more perfect? …and there’s a 25 % chance of…. well, I’m not going to call it rain, since there’s no chance of accumulation…. aggressive mist…. tonight and tomorrow night.

…and the weekend tourists have headed home, so traffic isn’t as awful. There was some kind of motorcycle rally up the Yachats river so we’ve been listening to too-loud bikes all weekend…. yes, that’s part of the weather report. 🙂

Yesterday was a busy day. We were in early, cooking, and I didn’t get off my feet and stop doing that until about 4:30, so sleeping last night was interesting. Tempus let me sleep in this morning and then brought me back to the shop at about 1:30….

One of the big things yesterday was to get the pickled mushrooms started. That took some doing. This is another food experiment. I’m going to be trying some pickled onions next if I can get some boiling onions. I’m going to have Tempus try the Farmer’s Market. I love cooking and these experiments are a *lot* of fun for me!

We had a good feast: beef cooked in wine with mushrooms and a gravy to go with it from the drippings (the beef was from a score of 40 pounds of Angus beef for less than the price of regular, that we brought home and cut up) oat/wheat bread, pease/barley pottage, vegetables cooked in beef broth, fried cheese, stuffed mushrooms and all the trimmings. We ate like (medieval) kings! 🙂 …and then sat there, stuffed, staring at each other….. 🙂 and mostly everyone headed home fairly soon, although Tempus and I stayed at the shop, cleaning up and doing the other chores that were neglected during the cooking.

We didn’t head  home until past 11 and fell into bed.

Today I was curled up in bed sewing for awhile after I contacted Tempus to tell him I was up. He was dealing with phone and lots of customers in and out for awhile, but when that slack off he put a sign in the window and came back for me.

We’re cleaning up from the feast today…well, right now we’re having coffee and cheese toast…. but we’re sorting things out. I need to do some work on herbs, so I want the back table clear again, and I need to make some sandwich spread. We have an interesting corn-added wheat bread loaf that we’re finishing up and are going to try a rye-added loaf, next. …and then possibly one with cracked wheat.

Wicca 101 tonight again. We’re getting close to being finished with this, finally!

einstein thinking wise

Today is the anniversary of the date of the deaths of the Russian Royal Anasig-1-family (the Romanovs) during the Bolshevik Revolution. Anastasia is the best known of the family at this point as the details have dropped from memory during the almost-century since the murders. Anastasia was the next-to-youngest in the family and was rumored to have survived the massacre. Alas, that has been proved to not be the case. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duchess_Anastasia_Nikolaevna_of_Russia  There is a possibility that her older sister Maria survived (and had been rumored to be Anastasia), although it hasn’t been proved. We’ll probably never know for certain.

plant pic Rhododendron_occidentale_StrybingToday’s Plant is the Western AzaleaRhododendron Occidentale. I talked a while back about the azaleas being a subset of the rhodys. This is the main one that grows around here. It’s hard to tell from the shape and size of the plant that it’s an azalea, or even from the flowers, although the branches are thinner and the leaves shorter and rounder than those of rhododendrons. It least it’s hard for those of us who are familiar with the showy garden hybrids, which tend to be small and compact. The other West Coast azalea is Rhododendron Albiflorum, and there’s not a whacking lot of info floating around about that one. The wiki is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_occidentale The Chinese call azaleas “thinking of home bush”. Magickal uses for azalea are to encourage light spirits, happiness and gaiety.

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/23 at 2:46am.  Waning Crescent Moon –Best time for beginning introspective magicks that are more long term (full year cycle) A good time for beginning knot magicks to “bind up” addictions and illness (finish just before the Tide Change of Dark to New) and “tying up loose ends” God/dess aspects – Demeter weeping for her Daughter, Mabon, Arachne Tyr. Phase ends on 7/18 at 2:46pm.

Venus starts the week above Aldebaran and ends the week closer to Aldebaran’s upper left.
If you have a dark enough sky, the Milky Way forms a magnificent arch very high across the whole eastern sky after nightfall is complete. It runs all the way from below Cassiopeia in the north-northeast, up and across Cygnus and the Summer Triangle high in the east below bright Vega, and down past the spout of the Sagittarius Teapot in the south.
Venus (magnitude –4.1) shines brightly in the east before and during dawn. Aldebaran, much fainter at magnitude +0.9, moves away from Venus’s right toward the upper right this week.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Taurus at
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Lavendar

Planting 17-18

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
M   17      Low   1:36 AM     1.2   5:48 AM    Rise  1:11 AM      50
~    17     High   7:23 AM     5.2   8:56 PM     Set  2:47 PM
~    17      Low   1:12 PM     1.4
~    17     High   7:46 PM     7.4

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – You are the only person you need to please.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – Wiki – If you had to move to another state, which one would you choose?

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Quotes  

~  Courage to start and willingness to keep everlasting at it are the requisites for success. – Alonzo Newton Benn
~  Don’t torture yourself, Gomez. That’s my job. – Morticia
~  Every person has a warrior inside. It is a personal decision as to whether you utilize this archetype or not. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat. – Winston Churchill

Balmily, balmily, summer wind,
Sigh through the mountain passes;
Over the sleep of the beautiful deep
Over the woods green masses
Ripple the grain of valley and plain,
And the reeds and the river grasses. – Ina Donna Coolbrith (1841–1928)

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Lughnasadh Magick –

Crone’s Corner – Celebrating Lughnasadh, or Lammas  

Lughnassadh (pronounced “LOO-nahs-ah”) or Lammas, is one of the Greater Wiccan Sabbats and is usually celebrated on August 1st or 2nd, although occasionally on July 31st. The Celtic festival held in honor of the Sun God Lugh (pronounced “Loo”) is traditionally held on August 7th. Some Pagans celebrate this holiday on the first Full Moon in Leo. Other names for this Sabbat include the First Harvest Festival, the Sabbat of First Fruits, August Eve, Lammastide, Harvest Home, Ceresalia (Ancient Roman in honor of the Grain Goddess Ceres), Feast of Bread, Sabbat of First Fruits, Festival of Green Corn (Native American), Feast of Cardenas, Cornucopia (Strega), Thingtide and Elembiuos. Lughnassadh is named for the Irish Sun God Lugh (pronounced Loo), and variant spellings for the holiday are Lughnasadh, Lughnasad, Lughnassad, Lughnasa or Lunasa. The most commonly used name for this Sabbat is Lammas, an Anglo-Saxon word meaning “loaf-mass”.

The Lughnassadh Sabbat is a time to celebrate the first of three harvest celebrations in the Craft. It marks the middle of Summer represents the start of the harvest cycle and relies on the early crops of ripening grain, and also any fruits and vegetables that are ready to be harvested. It is therefore greatly associated with bread as grain is one of the first crops to be harvested. Wiccans give thanks and honor to all Gods and Goddesses of the Harvest, as well as those who represent Death and Resurrection.

This is a time when the God mysteriously begins to weaken as the Sun rises farther in the South, each day grows shorter and the nights grow longer. The Goddess watches in sorrow as She realizes that the God is dying, and yet lives on inside Her as Her child. It is in the Celtic tradition that the Goddess, in her guise as the Queen of Abundance, is honored as the new mother who has given birth to the bounty; and the God is honored as the God of Prosperity.

Symbols to represent the Lammas Sabbat include corn, all grains, corn dollies, sun wheels, special loaves of bread, wheat, harvesting (threshing) tools and the Full Moon. Altar decorations might include corn dollies and/or kirn babies (corn cob dolls) to symbolize the Mother Goddess of the Harvest. Other appropriate decorations include Summer flowers and grains. You might also wish to have a loaf of whole cracked wheat or multigrain bread upon the altar.

Deities associated with Lughnassadh are all Grain and Agriculture Deities, Sun Gods, Mother Goddesses and Father Gods. Particular emphasis is placed on Lugh, Demeter, Ceres, the Corn Mother and John Barleycorn (the personification of malt liquor). Key actions associated with Lammas are receiving and harvesting, honoring the Parent Deities, honoring the Sun Gods and Goddesses, as well as celebration of the First Harvest.

It is considered a time of Thanksgiving and the first of three Pagan Harvest Festivals, when the plants of Spring wither and drop their fruits or seeds for our use as well as to ensure future crops. Also, first grains and fruits of the Earth are cut and stored for the dark Winter months.

Activities appropriate for this time of the year are the baking of bread and wheat weaving – such as the making of Corn Dollies, or other God & Goddess symbols. Sand candles can be made to honor the Goddess and God of the sea. You may want to string Indian corn on black thread to make a necklace, and bake corn bread sticks shaped like little ears of corn for your Sabbat cakes. The Corn Dolly may be used both as a fertility amulet and as an altar centerpiece. Some bake bread in the form of a God-figure or a Sun Wheel .

It is customary to consume bread or something from the First Harvest during the Lughnassadh Ritual. Other actions include the gathering of first fruits and the study of Astrology. Some Pagans symbolically throw pieces of bread into a fire during the Lammas ritual.

The celebration of Lammas is a pause to relax and open yourself to the change of the Season so that you may be one with its energies and accomplish what is intended. Visits to fields, orchards, lakes and wells are also traditional. It is considered taboo not to share your food with others

Traditional Pagan Foods for the Lughnassadh Festival include homemade breads (wheat, oat and especially cornbread), corn, potatoes, berry pies, barley cakes, nuts, wild berries, apples, rice, roasted lamb, acorns, crab apples, summer squash, turnips, oats, all grains and all First Harvest foods. Traditional drinks are elderberry wine, ale and meadowsweet tea.

It is also appropriate to plant the seeds from the fruit consumed in ritual. If the seeds sprout, grow the plant with love and as a symbol of your connection to the Divine. A cake is sometimes baked, and cider is used in place of wine.

As Summer passes, Wiccans remember its warmth and bounty in the food we eat. Every meal is an act of attunement with Nature From Miss Daney’s Folklore, Magic and Superstitions

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Sniglet – Any word which should be in the dictionary but isn’t.

Sub-atomic toasticles – The little bits of toast that somehow always get stuck on the stick of butter.

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