Daily Stuff 7-28-17 Ólavsøka

Hi, folks!

Open Circle for Lughnasadh tonight at 7pm at Ancient Light!

61F and clear. There’s a touch more wind than yesterday in town, no more on the beaches. Humidity at 74%.

Yesterday flew past. There was lots of to, but all little stuff. The big one is that the new candle display is almost ready and we have the candles to fill it! I got the felt into the pockets so that the candles won’t get damaged by the metal. I just need to do the circles for the bottoms and then I’ll be filling the pockets!

The clouds rolled away yesterday and sunset was lovely with primrose colors and a lovely moon hanging just above. Tempus dropped me at the apartment and took off for Newport. I worked on sewing during the evening. He got in at 6am.

Today started with moans and groans and watering plants. I’m waiting for coffee. I want to fill the pincushions that I got done and finish the candle display, butt hat’s going to wait until I get the sheet printed for the sabbat. Tempus needs to make a loaf of bread.

Einstein saying

220px-Faroe_stamp_330_olavsoka_-_horses_on_paradeToday’s Feast is Ólavsøka, a big midsummer festival in the Faroe Islands. Parliament opens on this day. The name is St. Olaf’s Wake, after the death of St. Olaf in 1030CE, but the parliament predates that. There’s a concert and boat races, football and a bunch of other stuff going on…and it actually starts the night of the 28th…  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%93lavs%C3%B8ka

plant pic miners lettuceToday’s plant is Candy FlowerClaytonia siberica, (also called Siberian Spring Beauty, Siberian Miner’s Lettuce or Pink Purslane) is a flowering plant in the family Montiaceae, native to Siberia and western North America. A synonym is Montia sibirica. The plant was introduced into the United Kingdom by the 18th century where it has become very widespread. It is similar to Miner’s Lettuce in properties, but not as edible. – Feminine, Moon, Water, – Sprinkling it inside the home brings happiness, so it’s good in floor washes or new home blessings. Carry it with you for luck and to protect from violence. Put it into sleep pillows or add to a dream catcher to keep away nightmares. I’ve actually slipped it between the mattress and sheets for this purpose. This one is also a spirit-lifter.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claytonia_sibirica

The shop is open Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 8/7 at 11:11am. Waxing Crescent phase Keywords for the Crescent phase are: expansion, growth, struggle, opportunity. It is the time in a cycle that you gather the wisdom learned in the new phase and communicate your intention to move forward. Light a candle. Write or read an affirmation. LISTEN & ABSORB. Commit to your goal. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, energy and enthusiasm – Associated God/dess: Artemis & Apollo, Mayet/Djehuti, Freya/Frey. Phase ends at the Quarter on 7/30 at 8:23am.

Jupiter shines under the Moon this evening, more or less as drawn here (their exact placement will depend on your location).
The Sagittarius Teapot is in the south after darkness is complete. It’s about a fist at arm’s length wide, and it’s now tilting to pour from its spout on the right. The Teapot will tilt farther and farther, pouring out for the rest of the summer — or for much of the night if you stay out late.
Uranus (magnitude 5.8, in Pisces) and Neptune (magnitude 7.9, in Aquarius) are high in the southeast and south, respectively, before dawn begins. Finder charts.

Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992 Runic half-month of Thurisaz/ Thorn/Thunor, 7/29-8/12 – Northern Tradition honors the god known to the Anglo-Saxons as Thunor and to the Norse as Thor. The time of Thorn is one of ascendant powers and orderliness. This day also honors the sainted Norwegian king, Olaf, slain around Lammas Day. Its traditional calendar symbol is an axe.

Sun in Leo
Moon in Libra .
Saturn (8/25), Juno (8/26), Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5) Retrograde
Color: Pink

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet    Sunset                                     Visible
F   28     High   4:32 AM     6.6   5:59 AM    Rise 11:59 AM      23
~    28      Low  10:58 AM     0.1   8:46 PM     Set 11:55 PM
~    28     High   5:27 PM     7.1
~    28      Low  11:46 PM     1.4

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – I am discovering how wonderful I am.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What if? – If you were principal of your local school, what would you do?

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Quotes  

~  We are all worms, but I do believe that I am a glow worm. – Winston Churchill
~  We are continually faced by great opportunities brilliantly disguised as insoluble problems. – Lee Iacocca
~  We get what we expect in life, and if you expect to achieve your dreams then you will. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  We know the worth of a thing when we have lost it. – French Proverb

O Thou who passest thro’ our vallies in
Thy strength, curb thy fierce steeds, allay the heat
That flames from their large nostrils! thou, O Summer,
Oft pitched’st here thy golden tent, and oft
Beneath our oaks hast slept, while we beheld
With joy, thy ruddy limbs and flourishing hair. – William Blake (1757–1827)

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Lughnasadh Magick – Spells

Lughnasadh Bread Spell

In Wiccan tradition, and in many others, Lughnasadh is a day for preparing food from early ripening fruits like apples. It is also a time for baking bread in honor of the harvest.

Combining the two, make an applesauce bread. Stir the batter clockwise, focusing on any craft or sport in which you wish to excel. As you stir, chant,

“Flour from grain,
the spell begins,
let the power rise within;
Apples from trees,
now impart,
Tailtiu, bring _______
to my heart.”

Fill in the blank with a word that describes the area in which you want to encourage improvements or develop mastery. Eat the bread to internalize the energy.

Time-friendly alternatives here are buying frozen bread and adding diced apples to it, having toast with apple butter, or just enjoying a piece of bread and apple anytime during the day. Chant the incantation mentally. Then bite with conviction!

Adapted from Patricia Telesco~ From “365 Goddess” 

Cheddar Cheese Bread (goes with Harvest Bread Basket)

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 1 cup lukewarm milk (about 100ºF)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Just under 4 cups of flour–use until desired consistency
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 3 1/2 ounces mature cheddar cheese, grated

Instructions:

Combine the yeast and the milk and then stir, leaving for 15 minutes to dissolve. Meanwhile, melt the butter and let it cool. When it’s cool and the yeast is dissolved, add the butter to the yeast mix. Take out another bowl and combine the flour and the salt. Make a well in the middle of the dry mix and pour in the wet mix. (I suggest using three cups of flour and mix the salt into that, and then make the well, pour the wet in, and add more flour as needed. Add the flour until it’s a rough dough of a consistency that is easily kneaded.) Knead the bread dough on a floured surface until it’s smooth and elastic. Return the dough to the bowl, cover it with a towel, and let it rise in a warm spot until doubled, which will take anywhere from 2 to 3 hours.

Grease a 9 x 5 inch bread tin. Punch the dough down and knead in the last ingredient: The cheese. Knead it for a while to make sure that the cheese is distributed evenly throughout. Pick up the dough and twist it in the middle, curling the ends in also so that it will fit in the bread tin. Leave it in the warm spot again until the dough rises above the rim of the tin (45 minutes to an hour). Preheat the oven to 400º F, then bake the bread for 15 minutes. Lower the heat to 375º F and bake 15 to 30 minutes longer, until the bread can be turned out of the tin onto a rack and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom. Wait until cool before cutting.

NOTE: The original recipe was in a British book, so the measurements have been translated to American measurements for my easier use.

Yield: 1 loaf
Source: Martha Day, Complete Baking Use for: Lughnasadh, Mabon

Whole Grain Bread

Recipe by Dan & Pauline Campanelli
In a large mixing bowl combine:

2 cups milk (warm to the touch)
2 packages of dry baking yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup honey
1/4 cup dark brown sugar

Cover this mixture and set aside in a warm place until it has doubled (about half an hour).

Add to this mixture:

3 tablespoons softened butter
2 eggs
1 cup of unbleached white flour

Stir until bubbly. Now mix in:

1/2 cup wheat germ
1/2 cup of rolled oats
2 cups stone ground wheat flour
2 tablespoons sesame seed

With floured hands, turn this dough out onto a floured board and gradually knead in more unbleached white flour until the dough is smooth and elastic and no longer sticks to your fingers. Place this dough in a greased bowl, turning it so that the dough is greased. Then cover it with a clean cloth and keep it in a warm place to rise until it is doubled (about an hour).Then punch it down and divide it into two or more elongated loaves, roughly sculpted into mummiform shapes, and placed on greased cookie sheets. Cover these and return them to a warm place until they double again. Bake the loaves in a pre-heated oven at 350 degrees for about an hour, or until they are done and sound hollow when tapped.

(The above recipe for “Whole Grain Bread” is quoted directly from Pauline & Dan Campanelli’s book “Ancient Ways: Reclaiming Pagan Traditions”, page 132-133, Llewellyn Publications, 1991/1992)

From Miss Daney’s Folklore, Magic and Superstitions

Squash Salsa

Ingredients:

  • 1 yellow squash (peeled)
  • 1 zucchini (peeled)
  • 1 Carrot (peeled)
  • 3 Serrano chiles
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 Clove garlic
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 1 tablespoon marjoram
  • 4 tsp olive oil
  • 2 Tomatillos
  • 1 tablespoon Sugar
  • 1 tomato
  • 1 tbsp Salt

Directions:

  1. Finely dice all
  2. Mix in large bowl
  3. Let sit for an hour before serving

This is great for dipping the ritual breads in!

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Honoring Lugh

July 31st, 2007

Color of the day: Red
Incense of the day: Lavender

The evening of July 31 is the beginning of the Celtic holiday known as Lughnasadh (the Feast of the God Lugh). In Christian times, it was called Lammas (Anglo-Saxon for “Loaf Mass”). It has always been a special holiday for me, as it is my birthday! Lugh instituted this sacred time to honor his foster mother Tailtiu, who cleared the land in preparation for agriculture. Various divine women were honored at this time in Ireland, including Lugh’s wives Naas and Bui, the sorceress Carmun, and the goddess Macha. These goddesses seem to have given their lives or energies in order for the land to prosper. Thousands of years later, we can invoke their sacred names once more and make an offering of first fruits or a sacred loaf, lighting a flame in remembrance of their sacrifice.

By: Sharynne NicMhacha

Purification Paste Spell – Incense of the day: Ginger

Lammastide is traditionally a time of honoring the gods of harvest whose myths were associated with ritual sacrifice. One modern novel, Harvest Home by Thomas Tryon, describes a modern-day community that still performs human sacrifice for their crops. Many modern Witch covens select a harvest lord and corn maiden, as in the novel, to preside over their rituals for a full year. The young lord is honored with praise and gifts before he is ritually “sacrificed” (we’re talking symbolically, of course!) to feed the fields and ensure a good and bountiful harvest. The altar is decorated with produce. Bread is baked, and the scythe is displayed. Such rites are powerful as they capture the essence of the cycle of life—nature’s design that rules all living things. By: Ruby Lavender, Llewellyn 

Sacred Feast of Lughnasadh – August 1st, 2006

Color of the day: White – Incense of the day: Ginger

Lughnasadh was one of the four sacred feast days of the Celts. It marked the beginning of the harvest and was instituted by the god Lugh to honor his fostermother Tailtiu, who cleared the land for agriculture. Nasadh means an “assembly.” Huge Lugnasad assemblies took place in ancient Ireland, including one called the Feast of Carmun, in honor of a supernatural but ill-fated sorceress and warrior. Music, poetry, and the recitation of sacred lore took place, perhaps under the patronage of Lugh, a skilled harper, poet, and magician. Recite these lines from an ancient Irish poem to bring a harvest of abundance, creativity, and wisdom into your life:

Grain, milk, peace, and happiness,
Full nets, ocean’s plenty.
Feasts and fairs,
Knowledge and music,
Truthful teachings,
Books of lore.
May there ever be given to us from the gods
The pleasant fruits of the earth!

By: Sharynne NicMhacha

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Swimming with Sharks

Did you hear about the lawyer on vacation whose sailboat capsized in dangerous, shark-infested waters? He surprised his traveling companions by volunteering to swim to the far-off shore for help. As he swam, his companions were startled by the appearance of two dorsal fins — great white sharks, heading straight toward the lawyer. To their surprise, the sharks allowed the lawyer to take hold of their fins, and escorted him safely to shore.
When the lawyer returned with help, his companions asked him how he had managed such an incredible feat. The lawyer answered, “Professional courtesy.”

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