Daily Stuff 9-26-17 Fall of Jerusalem

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne.

Bright and sunny this morning. I’m writing at the apartment, so I can’t actually see the sky, but the distances through the trees are full of early sunlight. It’s supposed to get kinda breezy this afternoon. 55F and 94% humidity, but it’s early, yet. The rain is supposed to be back on Friday and through the weekend, so outside stuff needs to get taken care of in the next few days.

Yesterday stayed rather cloudy and gloomy all day. We had shoppers in, but not as many as Thursday and Friday. I spent awhile making emery strawberries in the middle of the afternoon and the rest of the day working on filling in newsletter files.

I made biscuits late in the afternoon and Tempus baked them and cut a bit of ham and heated some peas in the nuker for supper.

One of the students showed up for class and not the other. Hmm…

So we headed home a little early. Tempus went to sleep right away, but I was up reading and doing some writing. Then he got up early, worked on the computer and started the water going in the sunroom. Now he’s back asleep and I’m going to crawl back in, once this is out.

Today we have a lot of chores to do at home, then berry-picking and then we’ll be heading for the shop where I have some cookery to do. The paper run is tonight, so I’ll be there late.

Photo by Ken Gagne on 9/25/16

092516-ken-gagne

300px-Arch_of_Titus_MenorahToday is the anniversary of the day in 70CE when Jerusalem fell to Roman forces during the “Great Revolt”. The inhabitants were starving and had been for months, while the besieging armies crucified those who were trying to escape, sometimes 500 in a day where the folks inside the city could see them. The walls were razed and the city burned to the ground. Some information can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Jewish%E2%80%93Roman_War#Fall_of_Jerusalem

plant flower Dogviolet6Today’s Plant is the Early Blue VioletViola adunca – Violet leaves contain more vitamin A than spinach, and a half-cup of leaves has more vitamin C than four oranges, but rhizomes, fruits and seeds are poisonous. Other common names include the hooked-spur violet, Cascade violet, sand violet and the western dog violet. Found on Wiki here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viola_adunca or here:http://blogs.evergreen.edu/sustainableprisons/blog/2012/01/12/spp-plant-profile-early-blue-violet-viola-adunca/  Feminine, Venus, Water – Protects against malevolent spirits, brings changes in luck & fortune, wear to help with headaches, dizziness and to bring calm and sleep, wear in a green sachet to heal wounds.

The shop is open 11-7pm Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 10/5 at 11:40am. Waxing Crescent phase Keywords for the Crescent phase are: expansion, growth, struggle, opportunity. It is the time in a cycle that you gather the wisdom learned in the new phase and communicate your intention to move forward. Light a candle. Write or read an affirmation. LISTEN & ABSORB. Commit to your goal. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, energy and enthusiasm – Associated God/dess: Artemis & Apollo, Mayet/Djehuti, Freya/Frey. Phase ends at the Quarter on 9/27 at 7:54pm.

The waxing Moon steps eastward over Scorpius and Saturn early this week. The “star” below or lower left of the Moon this evening is Saturn, 3,800 times farther away: Saturn is currently 85 light-minutes distant, compared to the Moon’s 1.3 light-seconds.
Venus is the brilliant “Morning Star,” (magnitude –3.9) low due east in the dawn. Every day it’s sinking down lower toward Mars, and farther away from Regulus above it.

Goddess Month of Mala runs from 9/6 – 10/2
Celtic Tree Month of Muin/Vine, Sep 2 – 29
Celtic Tree Month of Gort/Ivy, Sep 30 – Oct 27 
Runic half-month of Kenaz/Ken/Kebo September 13-27 – Ken represents a flaming torch within the royal hall, so it’s the time of the creative fire – the forge where natural materials are transmuted by the force of the human will into a mystical third, an artifact that could not otherwise come into being. The positive aspects of sexuality that are immanent in Freya and Frey come into play at this time. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, p. 102 Runic half-month of Gebo/ GyfuSept 28-Oct 12 – Gyfu represents the unity that a gift brings between the donor & recipient. It is a time of unification, both between members of society and between the human and divine. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, p. 102

Sun in Libra
Moon in Sagittarius
Pluto (9/28), Neptune (11/22), Chiron (12/5), Pallas (12/17), Uranus (1/2/18)  Retrograde
Color – Scarlet

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©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Muin/Vine  Sep 2 – 29 – Muin  – (MUHN, like “foot”), vine – The grape (Vitis vinifera L.) is a vine growing as long as 35 m (115 feet), in open woodlands and along the edges of forests, but most commonly seen today in cultivation, as the source of wine, grape juice, and the grape juice concentrate that is so widely used as a sweetener. European grapes are extensively cultivated in North America, especially in the southwest, and an industry and an agricultural discipline are devoted to their care and the production of wine. Grapes are in the Grape family (Vitaceae).

Muin – Vine Ogam letter correspondences
Month: August
Color: Variegated
Class: Chieftain
Letter: M
Meaning: Inner development occurring, but take time for relaxation

to study this month – Koad – Grove Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Many Shades of Green
Class: None
Letter: CH, KH, EA
Meaning: Wisdom gained by seeing past illusions.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Tu  26     High   5:36 AM     5.8   7:09 AM    Rise  1:29 PM      28
~    26      Low  11:07 AM     3.0   7:06 PM     Set 11:12 PM
~    26     High   5:03 PM     6.7

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Make this an intentional day!

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – When? – When do you feel proud?

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Quotes  

~  We must have strong minds, ready to accept facts as they are. – Harry Truman
~  We speak them fairest when thoughts are falsest and wile the wisest of hearts. – Norse Adage
~  What inside of you is bound, that longs to be free? – T. Thorn Coyle
~  What is the benefit of worry? How many things that we worry about actually happen? Put another way: “Worry is misuse of the imagination.” – Anon

O sweet September rain!
I hear it fall upon the garden beds,
Freshening the blossoms which begin to wane. – Mortimer Collins (1827–76)

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Magick – Michaelmas by Ben Johnson – http://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/Michaelmas/

Michaelmas, or the Feast of Michael and All Angels, is celebrated on the 29th of September every year. As it falls near the equinox, the day is associated with the beginning of autumn and the shortening of days; in England, it is one of the “quarter days”.

There are traditionally four “quarter days” in a year (Lady Day (25th March), Midsummer (24th June), Michaelmas (29th September) and Christmas (25th December)). They are spaced three months apart, on religious festivals, usually close to the solstices or equinoxes. They were the four dates on which servants were hired, rents due or leases begun. It used to be said that harvest had to be completed by Michaelmas, almost like the marking of the end of the productive season and the beginning of the new cycle of farming. It was the time at which new servants were hired or land was exchanged and debts were paid. This is how it came to be for Michaelmas to be the time for electing magistrates and also the beginning of legal and university terms.

St Michael is one of the principal angelic warriors, protector against the dark of the night and the Archangel who fought against Satan and his evil angels. As Michaelmas is the time that the darker nights and colder days begin – the edge into winter – the celebration of Michaelmas is associated with encouraging protection during these dark months. It was believed that negative forces were stronger in darkness and so families would require stronger defences during the later months of the year.

Traditionally, in the British Isles, a well fattened goose, fed on the stubble from the fields after the harvest, is eaten to protect against financial need in the family for the next year; and as the saying goes:

“Eat a goose on Michaelmas Day,
Want not for money all the year”.

Sometimes the day was also known as “Goose Day” and goose fairs were held. Even now, the famous Nottingham Goose Fair is still held on or around the 3rd of October. Part of the reason goose is eaten is that it was said that when Queen Elizabeth I heard of the defeat of the Armada, she was dining on goose and resolved to eat it on Michaelmas Day. Others followed suit. It could also have developed through the role of Michaelmas Day as the debts were due; tenants requiring a delay in payment may have tried to persuade their landlords with gifts of geese!

In Scotland, St Michael’s Bannock, or Struan Micheil (a large scone-like cake) is also created. This used to be made from cereals grown on the family’s land during the year, representing the fruits of the fields, and is cooked on a lamb skin, representing the fruit of the flocks. The cereals are also moistened with sheeps milk, as sheep are deemed the most sacred of animals. As the Struan is created by the eldest daughter of the family, the following is said:

“Progeny and prosperity of family, Mystery of Michael, Protection of the Trinity”

Through the celebration of the day in this way, the prosperity and wealth of the family is supported for the coming year. The custom of celebrating Michaelmas Day as the last day of harvest was broken when Henry VIII split from the Catholic Church; instead, it is Harvest Festival that is celebrated now.

St Michael is also the patron saint of horses and horsemen. This could explain one of the ancient Scottish traditions that used to be practiced on Michaelmas Day. Horse racing competitions in the local communities would be held and small prizes won. However, with a twist, it was the only time at which a neighbour’s horse could be taken lawfully the night before and ridden for the entirety of the day, as long as the animal was returned safely!

In British folklore, Old Michaelmas Day, 10th October, is the last day that blackberries should be picked. It is said that on this day, when Lucifer was expelled from Heaven, he fell from the skies, straight onto a blackberry bush. He then cursed the fruit, scorched them with his fiery breath, spat and stamped on them and made them unfit for consumption! And so the Irish proverb goes:

“On Michaelmas Day the devil puts his foot on blackberries”.

The Michaelmas Daisy

The Michaelmas Daisy, which flowers late in the growing season between late August and early October, provides colour and warmth to gardens at a time when the majority of flowers are coming to an end. As suggested by the saying below, the daisy is probably associated with this celebration because, as mentioned previously, St Michael is celebrated as a protector from darkness and evil, just as the daisy fights against the advancing gloom of Autumn and Winter.

“The Michaelmas Daisies, among dede weeds,
Bloom for St Michael’s valorous deeds.
And seems the last of flowers that stood,
Till the feast of St. Simon and St. Jude.”

(The Feast of St. Simon and Jude is 28 October)

The act of giving a Michaelmas Daisy symbolises saying farewell, perhaps in the same way as Michaelmas Day is seen to say farewell to the productive year and welcome in the new cycle.

[Anja’s Note – The Michaelmas Daisy is actually an aster, Aster amellus]

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Perfume Counter

A teenage girl shopped at the mall and stopped at the perfume counter.
She sees, “My Sin”, “Desire”, and “Ecstasy”.
She says to the salesperson, “I don’t want to get emotionally involved…I just want to smell nice.”

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