Daily Stuff 1-17-18 Popeye

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Dennis Strachota. Minus Tide at 7:12 PM of -0.4 feet.

The wind is at 5mph in town, but there are spots closer to the water where it’s in the 20’s and 30’s. 58F and the breezes coming in the open window into the sunroom just feel refreshing, not chilling. We’ve got rain moving in and the temp is dropping now. We’re almost at the bottom of the curve on the barometric pressure. Hold on to your hats!

Yesterday was fairly quiet. We whomped through chores, taking a load of stuff that needed dishwashed upstairs and several loads of laundry. As I wore down I spent more time on the computer and embroidering and reading, eventually doing pretty much the last two.

Tempus headed out before 9 for the paper route. He said the conditions last night were ideal, dry and no wind and quiet and no elk, but when he came in at 5am I asked him, “Did you *fly*?” He admitted that he had been pushing it to see whether he could, with perfect conditions. He’s only gotten a couple of spatters of rain, and the only slowdown was the “guardian cat” on 118th that stands in the road, watching, but ducks into the bushes when he sees someone coming.

I was still up when he got in, having been startled out of a doze by a chopper or something a couple of times, and by the sunroom door (which doesn’t fit quite right) slipping open and shut, probably from wind, but when I’m home by myself…. well, I didn’t go back to sleep. I got the front of the newest pouch finished and did 2/3 of the pattern on the back, also cut another hexagonal pincushion (and part of a 2nd) and did the top embroidered panel and most of the bottom. I might be able to finish those today.

Today we got up a bit earlier than usual, but spent an hour watching a Japanese mapping satellite launch, and we’ve been talking a little. We need to finish our chores and there’s a meeting of business people and others tonight at Family Fabrics, hopefully a networking, brainstorming and planning meeting. (Hope springs eternal….)

Wow! It’s getting dark and stormy looking, almost at the bottom of the curve…. …and here comes the rain! Wow!

Photo by Dennis Strachota on 1/16/18 – “From my front deck (porch) lookng to the west, a View of the Three Sisters Peaks in the Cascade Mountain Range which extends from Canada to Mexico. One of the three sisters is hiding behind one of the two peaks. There is still another small mountain range between this one and the Pacific Ocean.”

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plant herb kinnikinnick Arctostaphylos-uva-ursiToday’s plant is KinnikinnickArctostaphylos uva-ursi. It is used medicinally for urinary tract complaints, as a “poverty food”, and as a smoking herb, known for giving visions. Magickally it is used for ceremonies. Add to sachets designed to increase psychic power. Full article here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctostaphylos_uva-ursi  More inhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bearberry

Popeye-littlesweatpea1936Today is the date in 1929 when Popeye, the creation of cartoonist Elzie Crisler Segar, first appeared in a comic strip in Thimble Theater! I’d bet if you’re over the age of 40 you can sing the tune of, “I’m Popeye the Sailor Man (toot, toot), I’m Popeye the Sailor Man (toot, toot), I fights to the finish, when I eats me spinach, I’m Popeye the Sailor Man (toot, toot)!” …probably if you’re under 40, too…. :-) More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popeye

The shop is open 11-5pm Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights.  Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 1/16 at 6:17pm. Dark of the Moon, End of the cycle In the time leading up to the “New Moon” you may do banishings and other baneful magicks and healings that require blasting a disease away, as well as using the time for introspection and self-work. Do scrying, now. Good for reversing circumstances. God/dess Aspect: The One Beyond, the Watchers in the Outer Dark, psychopomps – Associated God/desses: Hecate, Kali, Arianhrod, Anja, Kore in the Underworld, Ereshkigal who was Inanna, Set/Seth, Hades, Osiris. Phase ends at  on 1/16 at 6:17pm. 

Then on Monday morning the 15th, use binoculars to help pick up the hairline crescent low to the two planets’ left. Think photo challenge! Use a tripod and maximum zoom, or better, a long lens. For the scale of this scene, Mercury and Saturn appear only 3° apart (roughly the width of two fingers held at arm’s length).
On these moonless nights, explore little-known sights in Cassiopeia, high in the northwest — do you know about Eddie’s Coaster? — using Sue French’s Deep-Sky Wonders article, chart, and photos in the January Sky & Telescope, page 54. For some more ambitions dark-sky targets, try for the dark clouds in Taurus charted in Alan Whitman’s Going Deep column on page 57 of the same issue.
Venus remains hidden behind the glare of the Sun.

Goddess Month of Hestia runs from 12/26 – 1/22
Goddess Month of  Bridhe, runs from 1/23 – 2/19
Celtic Tree Month of Beth/Birch, Dec 24 – Jan 20
Celtic Tree Month of Luis/Rowan, Jan 21-Feb 17

Runic half-month of Perdhro/ Peorth, 1/12-1/27. – Feast of Brewing, Druidic, Source: The Phoenix and Arabeth 1992 Calendar. 

Sun in Capricorn
Moon in Capricorn
Ceres (3/18) Retrograde
Color – Maroon

©2018 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Beth/Birch, Dec 24 – Jan 20, Beith – (BEH), birch – The silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) is the most common tree birch in much of Europe. It grows up to 30 m (100 feet) high, but is more often found in spreading clumps on sandy soils. It is one of the first trees to colonize an area after a mature forest is cut; this is probably a large part of its symbolic connection with new beginnings. It is cultivated in North America, often under the name of weeping birch. The three trees in my front yard form root sprouts that would take over the bed where they are planted if I didn’t cut them back. The common birch (B. pubescens Ehrh.) is almost as widespread as the silver birch, but grows primarily on acid or peaty soils. It can reach 20 m (65 feet) in height. Birches are members of the Birch family (Betulaceae). Curtis Clark
Beth – Birch – Ogam letter correspondences –
Month: November
Color: White
Class: Peasant
Letter: B
Meaning: New Beginnings; Changes; Purification.
Phagos – Beech Ogam letter correspondences to study this month
Month: None
Color: Orange-brown
Class: Chieftain
Letter: PH, IO
Meaning: New experiences and information coming

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
W   17     High   1:09 AM     6.8   7:48 AM    Rise  8:07 AM      0
17      Low   6:29 AM     3.2   5:05 PM     Set  5:57 PM
17     High  12:12 PM     8.3
17      Low   7:12 PM    -0.4

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Duct tape is like the force; it has a light side and a dark side, and it holds the universe together.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What if? – What would you do if your new shoes felt fine in the store but now they are hurting?

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Quotes  

~  Ill is the result of letting fear rule thine actions. – The Saga of Harald Hardrade, c.46
~  If stupidity can be said to be the most common element, the rarest and most precious element is kindness. –  John Thomas Gordy
~  I am now convinced that theoretical physics is actually philosophy. – Max Born, Physicist, 1882-1970
~  If there were dreams to sell, what would you buy? – Thomas Lovell Beddoes

A cheer for the snow—the drifting snow!
Smoother and purer than beauty’s brow!
The creature of thought scarce likes to tread
On the delicate carpet so richly spread. – –Eliza Cook (1818–89)

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Imbolc Magick – Crafts

Brigit Candles – adapted from Starhawk, Baker and Hill’s Circle Round – Honor Brigit with new special candles. These candles use molds made from coiled salt dough ropes so that each completely unique candle bears the spiral imprint of the coil.

You will need:
1 recipe salt dough clay
a bowl of water
8 1/2 by 11 inch sheet of paper, one for each candle
wax paper, cut into 8 1/2 by 11 inch sheets, one for each candle tape
1 T vegetable oil
toothpicks
small bowl
candle making supplies

Taper Candles

  1. Make ropes by rolling salt dough clay between your hands. Each rope should be two or three feet long and 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter. If younger children can’t manage such lengths, have them make smaller segments that can be joined later with a little pressure and water. Dip your fingers into the bowl of water occasionally if the dough tends to crack.
  2. Roll the paper into a 1 inch wide cylinder and tape it shut.
  3. Around this cylinder, tape a piece of wax paper, coated with a thin layer of oil.
  4. Lightly moisten a salt dough rope with water.
  5. Lay the paper cylinder on its side at one end of the rope.
  6. Roll it along the dough, wrapping the rope up the cylinder until it is six inches tall. Be sure the edges of the coiled rope always touch.
  7. To provide extra support, at intervals stick several toothpicks vertically through the coils.
  8. Make a bottom for the mold by shaping another piece of salt dough into a 3/4 inch thick circle that’s larger than the coiled tower in diameter.
  9. Moisten the bottom’s surface, then carefully lift the coiled tower onto the bottom piece and press gently to make a seal.
  10. Pull the paper cylinder out. This slides out easily, leaving the wax paper. Remove it by gently tugging on the wax paper with one hand while you support the clay coils with the others.
  11. Inspect each part of the mold, looking for tiny cracks where melted wax could leak. Press these shut.
  12. If the coils start to sag, quickly fashion a paper cylinder around the outside of the coils and tape it closed. Trim it to the same height as the clay, so it won’t get in the way when you are pouring wax.
  13. Set the mold in an empty bowl, in case wax leaks through. You are ready to pour.
  14. Pouring the wax is thrilling! Go very slowly up each level to make sure no wax is leaking through. If a leak appears, carefully pinch it shut and pour again.
  15. Insert the wick.
  16. The wax will harden within an hour, long before the clay dries.
  17. To unmold, just unwind the clay. If some sticks, soak the candle in cool water and then gently rinse off the clay.

The candles have a wonderfully craggy spiral looping from bottom to top, and burn with a lovely strong flame.

Beehive Candles – You can also make beehive candles with great success by coiling ropes of salt dough in a small, deep bowl (a rice bowl is the perfect size)

  1. Start with making a spiral, about 3 inches across, outside of the bowl, then transfer this into the bottom of the bowl.
  2. Next coil the rope inside the bowl until you reach the top.
  3. The candle is burned with the dome side up, so the wick has to be extended through the wax at the bottom of the bowl. When the wax is firm enough to insert the wick, use a bamboo skewer pointed end down, and push it firmly through the candle, into the dough beneath, straight to the bottom of the bowl. Twist the skewer occasionally to make sure the wax doesn’t stick it into place.
  4. The candle unmolds easily: Lift candle and mold from the bowl and uncoil the mold.
  5. Pull out the skewer and insert a prepared wick.

Brigit Candleholder – To echo the Goddess’s symbol of the serpent, make this candleholder, which resembles a coiled snake. Follow directions for making a mold for taper candles, with the following differences:

  1. Size your holder by wrapping a paper cylinder around whatever candle you intend to use. Remove candle before proceeding further.
  2. Dough ropes should be about 1/2 inch wide and a foot long. If candleholder is taller than 4 inches, use toothpicks for extra support.
  3. Make the bottom by coiling a rope into a small circle.
  4. After the paper cylinder has been removed, use your candle to gently test of the open end of the candleholder is large enough to accommodate the candle. If it’s too small, delicately press the opening wider. If it’s too large, fill in with bits of salt dough.
  5. Bake the holder as directed. Turn after the first hour to be sure it does not stick to the pan.
    6 Cool completely after baking. Then paint with snaky patterns, finishing with eyes on the end of the top coil.

From “Circle Round” By Starhawk, Diane Baker and Anne Hill, adapted by Anja Reed Bartlett 1/11

Beehive Candles

You can also make beehive candles with great success by coiling ropes of salt dough in a small, deep bowl. A rice bowl is the perfect size.It’s easier to start with making a spiral, about 3 inches across, outside of the bowl, then transferring this into the bottom of the bowl. Next coil the rope inside the bowl until you reach the top. The candle is burned with the dome side up, so the wick has to be extended through the wax at the bottom of the bowl. When the wax is firm enough to insert the wick, use a slightly larger straw than usual, and push it firmly through the candle, into the dough beneath, straight to the bottom of the bowl. The candle unmolds easily: Lift candle and mold from the bowl and uncoil the mold. – From “Circle Round” By Starhawk, Diane Baker and Anne Hill

Make ropes by rolling salt dough clay between your hands. Each rope should be two or three feet long and 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter. If younger children can’t manage such lengths, have them make smaller segments that can be joined later with a little pressure and water. Dip your fingers into the bowl of water occasionally if the dough tends to crack. Roll the paper into a 1 inch wide cylinder and tape it shut. Around this cylinder, tape a piece of wax paper. Coat the wax paper with a thin layer of oil. Lightly moisten a salt dough rope with water. Lay the paper cylinder on its side at one end of the rope. Roll it along the dough, wrapping the rope up the cylinder until it is six inches tall. Be sure the edges of the coiled rope always touch. To provide extra support, at intervals stick severaltoothpicks vertically through the coils. Make a bottom for the mold byshaping another piece of salt dough into a 3/4 inch thick circle that’s larger than the coiled tower in diameter. Moisten the bottom’s surface, then carefully lift the coiled tower onto the bottom piece and press gently to make a seal. Pull the paper cylinder out. This slides out easily, leaving the wax paper. Remove it by gently tugging on the wax paper with one hand while you support the clay coils with the others. Inspect each part of the mold, looking for tiny cracks where melted wax could leak. Press these shut. If the coils start to sag, quickly fashion a paper cylinder around the outside of the coils and tape it closed. Trim it to the same height as the clay, so it won’t get in the way when you are pouring wax. Set the mold inan empty bowl, in case wax leaks through. You are ready to pour. Pouring the wax is thrilling. Go very slowly up each level to make sure no wax is leaking through. If a leak appears, carefully pinch it shut and pour again. Insert the wick. The wax will harden within an hour, long before the clay dries. To unmold, just unwind the clay. If some sticks, soak the candle in cool water and then gently rinse off the clay. The candles have a wonderfully craggy spiral looping from bottom to top, and burn with a lovely strong flame.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Jumping Up and Down

A pharmacist looks out the front of the store and sees a woman holding a bottle jumping up and down in the parking lot. The pharmacist walks out to the parking lot and asks the woman, “Whats the matter?”
She replies ” I saw it said ‘Shake Well’ after I took it”.

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