Daily Stuff 1-25-18 Disting

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Greg Anderson, Sewing from 5-7pm.

48F, wind at 12mph, and we had gotten almost 1/2 an inch of rain at 7am. Now, it’s not showing….We got nearly an inch yesterday, too.

We didn’t get moving until past 4 yesterday, so it was a short day. Granted we were *awake* long before that, but…. I had gotten the newsletter out earlier, but as I said I was going to, I went back to bed. We did get our chores done, all but moving the plants, but we looked at the hail that was coming down right at the moment, and decided not to.

During the evening we had the rest of the cabbage rolls and I worked on a couple of pieces of embroidery/sewing, read and worked on the computer. Tempus puttered and caught up on his mail. During the evening when I went upstairs to do my hair the moon was shining and I could see the Pleiades, but it was already raining when I came back out.

This morning I was awakened by hail pounding on the sunroom roof before 7am. I got up and worked a bit and went back to sleep, waking to Tempus saying, “Honey, you gotta get up, it’s nearly 11!” and it truly was. We were late to the shop, pulling into the lot at 10 past and I’m still awfully groggy. <gleep> We’ve already had two phone calls and two sets of customers! I have a sewing order to finish and some pictures to take, while Tempus is working on books, because we’re hoping to do that inventory this afternoon.

Greg Anderson from 1/22/15 the Yachats Wayside Spouting Horn

Greg Anderson 012215 Yachats spouting horn.

Today’s Plant is the Western Azalea,plant pic Rhododendron_occidentale_Strybing Rhododendron Occidentale. Azaleas are a subset of the rhodys. This is the main one that grows around here. It’s hard to tell from the shape and size of the plant that it’s an azalea, or even from the flowers, although the branches are thinner and the leaves shorter and rounder than those of rhododendrons. It least it’s hard for those of us who are familiar with the showy garden hybrids, which tend to be small and compact. The other West Coast azalea is Rhododendron Albiflorum, and there’s not a whacking lot of info floating around about that one. The wiki is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_occidentale The Chinese call azaleas “thinking of home bush”. Magickal uses for azalea are to encourage light spirits, happiness and gaiety.

Disir feast 0125Today is the eve of Disting, or Disablot, a festival in honor of the Disir, the female helper spirits. Here’s one version of a ritual.  http://www.adf.org/rituals/norse/disting/disting.html and a link about the Disir here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disir …and here’s another link with related information. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%ADsabl%C3%B3t

The shop is open 11-5pm Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights.  Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon MagickThe waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 1/31 at 5:27am.  Waxing Gibbous Moon – From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Keywords for the Gibbous phase are: analyze, prepare, trust. It is the time in a cycle to process the results of the actions taken during the First Quarter. During this phase you are gathering information. Give up making judgments; it will only lead to worry. Your knowledge is incomplete. Laugh. Analyze and filter. LOOK WITHIN. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, but in the uncommitted phase, the Warriors – Associated God/desses: Dion, Dionysius, Venus, Thor. Phase ends at the Full on 1/29 at 5:27pm. 

The Moon visits the Pleiades and the Hyades as it crosses Taurus after first quarter.
Now Menkar shines about 10° below the Moon by mid-evening. And you’ll find the Pleiades about half again that far above the Moon.
Mercury is lost in the glow of sunrise.

Goddess Month of  Bridhe, runs from 1/23 – 2/19
Celtic Tree Month of Luis/Rowan, Jan 21-Feb 17
Runic half-month of Perdhro/ Peorth, 1/12-1/27. – Feast of Brewing, Druidic, Source: The Phoenix and Arabeth 1992 Calendar. Runic half-month of Elhaz/Algiz, from 1/28-2/11. This half month: optimistic power, protection and sanctuary. 

Sun in Aquarius
Moon in Taurus
Ceres (3/18) Retrograde
Color – Purple

Planting 1/24-26

©2018 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Luis/Rowan, Jan 21-Feb 17, Luis (LWEESH)/rowan – The rowan, or mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia L.) is related to servceberries. The red berries were historically used to lure birds into traps, and the specific epithet aucuparia comes from words meaning “to catch a bird”. Birds are also responsible for dispersing the seeds. Rowans thrive in poor soils and colonize disturbed areas. In some parts of Europe they are most common around ancient settlements, either because of their weedy nature or because they were planted. Rowans flower in May. They grow to 15 m (50 feet) and are members of the Rose family (Rosaceae). They are cultivated in North America, especially in the northeast.

Luis – Rowan Ogam letter correspondences
Month: December
Color: Grey and Red
Class: Peasant
Letter: L
Meaning: Controlling your life; Protection against control by others.

Quert – Apple Ogam letter correspondences to study this month
Month: None
Color: Green
Class: Shrub
Letter: Q
Meaning: A choice must be made

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Th  25     High   6:11 AM     7.8   7:42 AM     Set  1:19 AM      48
~    25      Low   1:11 PM     1.5   5:16 PM    Rise 12:14 PM
~    25     High   7:10 PM     5.6

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Know your worth, name your price. J.D.W

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What is? – What is my earliest or happiest memory?

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Quotes  

~  Surrendering to habits is allowing yourself to get entangled in the chaos of life. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  The final obstacle in meditation is ecstasy; you feel great bliss and happiness and want to stay in that ecstasy. Do not yield to it but pass on to the next stage which is great calm. – Sri Ramana Maharshi
~  The main thing is keeping the main thing the main thing. – German Proverb
~  The making of friends, who are real friends, is the best token we have of a man’s success in life. – Edward Everett Hale

Janus am I; oldest of potentates! Forward I look and backward and below I count as god of avenues and gates The years that through my portals come and go. I block the roads and drift the fields with snow, I chase the wild-fowl from the frozen fen; My frosts congeal the rivers in their flow, My fires light up the hearths and hearts of men. – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, written for the Children’s Almanac.

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Imbolc Magick – Lore – Imbolc tidbit – From:  http://irelandsown.net/imbolc.html

Imbolc —by Míchealín Ní Dhochartaigh – “And she shall arise like a shining sun” —The Book of Lismore

Celebrated on February 2

Imbolc, a Celtic word meaning ‘in the belly’, celebrates the midwinter and the return of the sun. It is also known as Oimelc, Brighid, Imbolg, Imbollgc Brigantia, and Lupercus. The ‘belly’ being referred to is that of the Great Mother.

Imbolc Also known as Candlemas or St Brighid’s Day (its Christianised titles) and Groundhog Day:

If Candlemas be bright and fair
Winter will have another year
But if it be dark with clouds and rain
Winter is gone, and will not come again

Symbols – Snowflakes, crystals, lambs, milk, Brighid’s Cross, white flowers, orange or yellow candles, alder, hazel, wisteria, myrrh, basil, rowan

Imbolc is  a celebration of knowledge and understanding, and a celebration of the beauty and mysteries of life. Its themes include purification, inspiration, new beginnings.

New Life

This time of year has traditionally been the lactation period of ewes and cows. Ewes are unable to produce milk until after they bear their young, which occurs at this time. Since milk was very important to the basic survival of the Celtic tribes, this was a time of great joy, and signified that the end of a long winter was in sight. At Imbolc, we are one with Nature, as we await the coming of spring, the Vernal Equinox, when day and night are equal; light has vanquished the dark and a new change is upon the land.

At sunset on Imbolc, it is traditional to light every lamp or candle in the house in honour of the sun’s rebirth.

Brighid

The Celtic Goddess Brighid (Brid, Bride, Brigante) presides over Imbolc. Brighid, the radiant triple-Muse Goddess, is also a fertility-bringer. At Imbolc, Brighid is pregnant with the seed of the Sun, ready for new life to awaken within the Earth. She was later adopted by Christianity as a ‘Saint’.

See Brighid, The Goddess of the Sun for more about Brighid.

Traditions

In some circles, ‘Brid’s bed,’ the union place of the Goddess and the Sun God, is created and placed within the circle, inviting the fertility of life that begins anew around us. This is done by creating a female figure of straw or a ‘Brid’s Cross,’ and laying it in a basket at the center of the circle with a phallic wand across it to symbolize the impregnation of the Mother.

It is tradition for every candle or lamp in the house to be lit for a little while welcoming the return of the Sun. Reverence of the snow is also a part of this celebration, and this festival falls during the Snow Moon. Some symbols or tools to have for present for ritual include a representation of a white flower or a snowflake and an orange or yellow candle to symbolise the renewing energy of the Sun’s rebirth.

Imbolc is also a fire festival, with significance placed upon the Light of fire, to celebrate the ever-increasing light at this time — symbolic of the Earth working Her way back to Spring. Brighid is crowned with a wreath of candles. Some circles make a ceremony of ‘charming the plow,’ in which they bless a spade or shovel with oil or wine, and then use it to dig a hole in the earth and bury an offering to the Mother.

During the Imbolc ritual, most traditions also pour milk onto the earth as a ‘thanksgiving’ to Brighid; and as an offering of nurturing with hope of the return of fertility to the Earth and its people. According to some sources, alder and hazel are coming into bloom and make great offerings. In the Celtic Tree Calendar, rowan is associated with the festival for Imbolc. It is a member of the apple family, and if you cut across the berries horizontally, a tiny, pentagram-shaped seed container will be revealed, much like a wee version of the one found inside an apple. Copyright © 2001 Ireland’s OWN

A Candlemas Poem —from Casting the Circle by Diane Stein

Night of lit white candles
Darkness turned into light
Everything she touches changes
Feast of waxing flame
Fire of heart and hearth
Fire on the mind
Flickering of spark
Quickening of air
Warming into inspiration
Thawing in her innocence
Snow into desire
He shines for all of us
She burns within us all
Spiral heat of life
She shines for all of us
Within us all she burns
The fires to create
She shines in all of us
She burns us all within
Awakening arising is her need
She shines for all of us
She burns within us all
Her candle is our only source

Copyright © 2004 Ireland’s OWN All Rights Reserved.

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – 

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