Daily Stuff 3-14-18 Pie Day

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. We’re going to spring hours this week. Closing at 6pm. We’ll be there for some extra time during spring break week.

It’s sunny! 57F with a few clouds drifting by, looks like another nice day. Tomorrow might be grey and damp, but then we have a another stretch of dry weather coming.

Yesterday was a stay-home-and-rest day for most of it. We slept late, read and computered in bed and I embroidered. Other than the newsletter and coffee and toast (from some of Tempus’ delicious bread….) we didn’t even try to get anything done until well past 4pm. Well, we needed it….. So Tempus did chores upstairs, got trash out and hung a picture and our mandala, while I sorted and put away a bunch of things and then we headed for the shop.

There was hail and rain both, in the late afternoon before we headed out, but it was dry for a bit as we did. There was a heron standing on the sand flats west of the bridge. We sat down with toast, with cheddar and the pease pottage that I made the other day. Yummy supper!

One of the newspaper route customer’s house caught fire yesterday. http://www.newslincolncounty.com/archives/198735  They’re ok, but during the afternoon we had to work out where to deliver their paper. I finally got hold of their daughter-in-law, so we knew where to go. I got to working on newsletter stuff while Tempus was doing dishes. I got a nap after awhile and then once I was awake again (he was already in Newport by then) went through stuff in the fridge, trying to whittle down the detritus.

Tempus called several times, the last time at the end of the Bayview Loop at 2am. He was running a little ahead. Apparently the rain wasn’t slowing him down any, but it wasn’t heavy. He picked me up at am and we almost flew through the rest of the route. It was cool with the window down, spits of rain and didn’t get us wet, not enough wind to re-toss the papers…. couldn’t have asked for a better night! We got glimpses of stars and it mostly cleared up right around 4, but by 4:30 a big orange cloud drifted over and it spat at us for the remainder of the route. We were done by 5:30 and headed home.

I just woke up about 15 minutes ago. …wow…. from a nightmare, too, so I woke yelling which didn’t help Tempus’ composure much. We have some more chores to do, but we’re taking mostly another rest day. Spring break is coming….

A Ken Gagne photo from 3/12 of a wave “explosion” on the Yaquina Bay North Jetty.

AmanitasToday’s plant is the Fly Agaric,  Amanita Muscaria, the “toadstool” of fairy tales. It’s easily recognizable with its bright red and white cap. Poisonous and hallucinogenic, it’s a favorite of the weirder Fae and a common decoration for Yule trees….for which a lot of people have come up with odd reasons. It probably is an ancient enough association with the time of year that people have forgotten, but there may be a connection through reindeer, shamanism and Odin to Santa Claus and the other gifting deities…. you *can* use the dried mushroom in amulets for vision quests, just don’t eat the darned thing! More here: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Amanita_muscaria

Pi Day is observed on 3/14. In 2015 Pi Day had special significance on 3/14/15 (mm/dd/yy date format) at 9:26:53 a.m. and also at p.m., with the date and time representing the first 10 digits of π. Lots of events on this day are because of the Pi/Pie homophone. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi_Day

feast 0314 Mamuralia mosaic_calendar_MarchThe Mamuralia was an ancient Roman Feast representing the transition from the old to the new year.  More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mamuralia  The story goes that Mamurius was commissioned by the rulers of Rome to make 11 exact replicas of the shield of Mars that had fallen from the sky. He did and asked to be remembered in a hymn that was sung on this day for centuries….

The shop is open 11-6pm (Spring Hours, now) Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights.  Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 3/17 at 6:12am. Hecate’s Brooch – 3-5 days before New Moon – Best time for Releasing Rituals. It’s the last few days before the new moon, the time of Hecate’s Brooch. This is the time that if you’re going to throw something out, or sweep the floors, or take stuff to Good Will, do it! Rid yourself of negativity and work on the letting go process. Release the old, removing unwanted negative energies, addictions, or illness. Do physical and psychic cleansings. Good for wisdom & psychic ability. Goddess Aspect: Crone – Associated God/desses: Callieach, Banshee, Hecate, Baba Yaga, Ereshkigal, Thoth. Phase ends at the Dark on 3/15 at 6:12pm. 

With no Moon in the evening sky, this is a fine week to look for the zodiacal light if you live in the mid-northern latitudes — since the ecliptic tilts high upward from the western horizon at nightfall in March. From a clear, clean, dark site, look west at the very end of twilight for a vague but huge, narrow pyramid of pearly light. It’s very tall and tilted to the left, aligning along the constellations of the zodiac. What you’re seeing is sunlit interplanetary dust, orbiting the Sun near the ecliptic plane.
Uranus sinks away in the west at nightfall.

😦 Stephen Hawking, now free of his body that failed him too soon, while his mind kept right on going, is soaring among the stars. R.I.P. This is my favorite pic of him, on the plane nicknamed the “vomit comet” that is used for training in weightlessness. Thank you for the gift of your intelligence and insight! – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hawking 

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky Map for March 2018 – https://www.almanac.com/sites/default/files/skymap_march2018.pdf
Goddess Month of 
Moura, runs from 2/20-3/19
Goddess Month of Columbina runs from 3/20 – 4/17
Celtic Tree Month of Nuin/Nion/Ash, Feb 18 – Mar 17
Celtic Tree Month of Fearn/Alder, Mar 18 – Apr 14. 

Runic half-month of Berkana/ Beorc, 3/14-29 Half-month ruled by the goddess of the birch tree; a time of purification for rebirth and new beginnings. 

Sun in Pisces
Moon in Aquarius
Ceres (3/18) and Jupiter (7/10) Retrograde
Color – Yellow

Harvest 3/13-14

©2018 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Nuin/Nion/Ash, Feb 18 – Mar 17, Nion (NEE-uhn), ash – the common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) is a major tree of lowland forests in much of Europe, along with oaks and beeches. It grows to 40 m (130 feet) in open sites, with a broad crown reminiscent of American elm trees. Ash was and still is an important timber tree, and is a traditional material for the handle of a besom. The common ash is occasionally cultivated in North America, and similar native ash species are widely grown as street trees. Ashes are members of the Olive family (Oleaceae).

Nuin – Ash Ogam letter correspondences
Month: March
Color: Glass Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: N
Meaning: Locked into a chain of events; Feeling bound.

Ogam letter correspondences to study this month Oir – Spindle Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: White
Class: Peasant
Letter: TH, OI
Meaning: Finish obligations and tasks or your life cannot move forward.

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Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
W   14      Low   5:32 AM     2.8   7:30 AM    Rise  6:19 AM      13
~    14     High  11:18 AM     7.3   7:21 PM     Set  4:37 PM
~    14      Low   6:06 PM     0.4

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – World peace will come unnoticed.

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Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What do you think? – How would you spend your time if you were wealthy?

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Quotes  

~  Remember…to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment. – –Benjamin Franklin (1706-90)
~  Every secret of a writer’s soul, experience of his life, quality of his mind is written large in his works. – Virginia Woolf
~  Flowing water never goes bad; our door hubs never gather termites. – Chinese Proverbs
~  Friendship consists in forgetting what one gives and remembering what one receives. – Alexander Dumas

The supreme truth is established by total silence, not logical discussion and argument. He alone sees the truth who sees the universe without the intervention of the mind, and therefore without the notion of a universe. – Maharamayana, Reprinted with permission from “The Wisdom of the Hindu Gurus,” edited by Timothy Freke, published by Godsfield Press. The book can be purchased online through Amazon.

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Ostara Magick – Coloring Springtime Eggs With Natural Dyes

http://www.dld123.com/about/about.php?id=A11 Debra Lynn Dadd

Spring is the time for the celebration of eggs, for, even though we are able buy eggs year-round in the supermarket, in Nature eggs are seasonal. The eggs that we eat today are mostly from domesticated birds, but for thousands of years people collected eggs from the wild for food. Before 1900, wild bird eggs were on the menu in restaurants. In the wild, birds and other animals lay eggs only during the time of year when the weather is such that the hatched babies can survive. So there are no eggs in winter, and eggs are then again plentiful with the coming of Spring.

I first became aware of the seasonality of eggs when I visited a neighbor who raises chickens. She told me that her chickens require 14 hours of sunlight to lay eggs and that commercial eggs in the wintertime come from chickens raised under electric lights. Hens naturally have an ongoing urge to lay eggs from spring to fall, when they lose their feathers. Then they wait through the winter until 14 hours of sunlight return in the spring. Of course, depending on where in the world these chickens are, the actual date the 14 hours or more of sunlight begins and ends is different from place to place. Even though eggs are available in the supermarket all year long, in the scheme of Nature, our bodies really are not designed to eat them every day.

She also told me that hens start laying eggs at about six months of age, which in hen-years is equivalent to our human adolescence. And they lay at a rate that is considered “productive” by the egg industry for about a year. As the hen gets older, she produces fewer and fewer eggs, but they are larger.

Celebrating spring with eggs

Though Easter, as a holiday, is the Christian celebration of Christ’s new life after crucifixion, its origin and customs are much older. Since the beginning of our species, humankind has celebrated the new life of Spring, particularly in parts of the world where winters are cold and food is scarce.

Indeed, the very word for the season — Spring — describes the action of Nature at this time. The origin of “spring” goes back to the Old High German springan, which means to jump and perhaps to the Greek sperchesthai, which means to hasten. Spring certainly is the time when plant seedlings and baby animals hasten to jump out into existence. A spring is a source of water issuing from the ground, a coiled wire that jumps back into it’s original size after being depressed, an act or an instance of leaping up or forward, a quality of resilience. To spring is to come into being, to leap or jump up suddenly.

And so Spring is about newness, and in particular, about new life leaping forth once again, making the egg–which is the embodiment of new life itself–the perfect symbol of Spring.

Though we may today celebrate the egg as a symbol of rebirth in forms ranging from the most popular–chocolate–to the most expensive–encrusted with diamonds–using the actual egg itself for our spring celebrations restores this symbol to it’s original form in Nature.

The tradition of coloring eggs

The tradition of coloring eggs for springtime celebrations has deep roots in ancient times. It might have begun with the gathering of wild eggs of different natural colors in the spring. Although many eggs are naturally white, eggs of almost every color of the rainbow are known. As animals were domesticated and more white chicken eggs were eaten, it may have then become the custom to dye the white chicken eggs to look like the colored eggs of wild birds.

Colored eggs were given as gifts by the ancient Greeks, Persians, and Chinese at their spring festivals, and used by early Christians as a symbol of Jesus’ Resurrection. As early as the Middle Ages, eggs were colored and given as gifts at the Christian celebration. After being forbidden during the solemn fast of Lent, eggs were reintroduced on Easter Sunday, both as part of the feasting and as gifts for family, friends, and servants.

Though nowadays most people color their eggs with egg kits that contain dyes made from petrochemicals, for millennia eggs were colored with plant materials found in Nature. Barks, roots, and leaves from many plants produce beautiful natural dyes.

Coloring eggs provides an opportunity to experiment with plant materials that grow in your region — perhaps even in your own backyard. If coloring eggs is an activity you enjoy, consider keeping a scrapbook from year to year that documents the dyestuff used and the colors it produced. Books on natural dyes for fabrics can give you clues for dyes for eggs.

In addition to coloring eggs with natural colors, you can decorate your eggs to look like bird eggs. Eggshells are often intricately marked with blotches, scrawls, streaks or speckles, generally concentrated in a ring around the large end of the egg. You can make eggs with your own “bird” speckles, or make eggs that celebrate the eggs of actual birds that live in your area.

This is a good opportunity to learn about your local birds and what their eggs look like. For some pictures of bird eggs, visit the The Provincial Museum of Alberta, which has an on-line field guide with over 300 egg images and the birds they become. In addition, they have a fascinating explanation about how and why eggs have different shapes, colors, and speckle patterns.

How to color eggs with natural dyestuffs

Here’s how to color eggs with some plant-based dyes you probably already have in your kitchen. I have been delighted with the results of the colors I have tried and my friends have been thrilled to receive them as springtime gifts. The colors are very unusual — gentle, earthy, soft, and very vibrant, without being harsh like the artificial dyes — and when I tell people the colors come from plant dyes, they always want to know the origin of each color.

Directions:

NOTE: When coloring eggs with natural dyestuffs, the eggs are cooked and colored at the same time, in contrast to coloring with using an artificial dye kit, which requires cooking the eggs prior to coloring.

  1. Put raw, white-shelled, organically-raised eggs in a single layer in a pan. Cover with cold water.
  2. Add a little more than a teaspoon of white vinegar.
  3. Add the natural dyestuff for the color you want your eggs to be. (The more eggs you are dying at a time, the more dye you will need to use, and the more dye you use, the darker the color will be.)
  4. Bring water to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  5. Quickly check the eggs for color by removing them from the dye liquid with a slotted spoon.

If the color is as desired, pour off the hot dye liquid and rinse them immediately in cold water to stop the eggs from cooking. Continue to change the water until it stays cool in the pot because the eggs are no longer releasing heat. Drain and allow eggs to cool in the refrigerator.

If you wish a deeper color, strain the hot dye liquid into a container, then rinse the eggs immediately in cold water to stop them from cooking. Continue to change the water until it stays cool in the pot because the eggs are no longer releasing heat. Drain the last of the cold water, then cover the eggs with the strained dye liquid. Add more water if necessary so that the eggs are completely covered. Put into the refrigerator immediately and keep eggs in the refrigerator until the desired shade is achieved. Overnight is good. Longer than about twelve hours some of the colors just get muddier instead of deeper, and the lighter shades are more vibrant.

  1. Remove the dyestuff you used to color the eggs.

Red – Pink — Recommended but I haven’t yet tried: lots of red onion skins, cranberry juice, or frozen raspberries.

Orange — Yellow onion skins will dye to a deep orange right in the dye pot. Use the skins of two medium onions for four eggs.

Brown — Red beet skins make a beautiful mahogany brown. Roast fresh beets at 350 degrees until soft (about one to two hours, depending on size). Peel off the skin and about 1/8″ of the beet. Reserve beets for eating (they are delicious roasted!) and add the skins to the dye pot. Use about one egg-size beet per egg. Allow to soak overnight. Grape juice produces a beautiful sparkling tan (I think the sparkles are from the high sugar content of the grape juice–this is one of my favorites!) Also recommended but I haven’t yet tried: coffee.

Yellow — Saffron makes a bright yellow when eggs are soaked overnight. Use about 1/4 teaspoon saffron threads for four eggs. Recommended but I haven’t yet tried: tumeric or cumin, orange or lemon peels, or celery seed.

Green — Recommended but I haven’t yet tried: spinach. Carrot tops and peels from Yellow Delicious apples produced a yellow-green.

Blue — Red cabbage leaves make the most incredible robin’s-egg blue. Use about a quarter of a medium head of cabbage, chopped, for four eggs. After the 15 minutes of boiling, the eggs are still almost white, but after soaking the eggs in the dye liquid for about six hours, they turn very blue. Frozen blueberries produce a kind of steel-grey-blue right in the cooking pot. Use 1 cup blueberries for four eggs.

Deep Purple — Red wine makes a beautiful burgundy color right in the cooking pot. Cover the eggs completely with undiluted red wine, and add the vinegar right to the wine. Recommended but I haven’t yet tried: hibiscus tea.

Tips for successful results:

  • Use filtered or distilled water. Chlorine and other chemicals will work against the dye, making it less intense. Buy distilled water or use your own filtered water.
  • For deeper colors, use more dyestuff or let the eggs soak longer.
  • For even coverage, cook eggs in a pot large enough to hold enough water and dyestuff to completely cover the eggs, even after some of the liquid has evaporated during the 15 minute of boiling.
  • Again, for even coverage, if you continue to soak the eggs in the refrigerator after cooking, make sure the eggs are completely covered with the dye liquid.
  • Blot the eggs dry or allow them to air dry, as for some colors the dye will rub off while still wet. On the other hand, if you wish to make a white pattern on the egg, you can rub off some of the dye for some colors immediately after cooking.
  • Make sure eggs of different colors are completely dry before piling them up in a bowl together, as wet dye from one egg can transfer to another.

Cold-dipped Egg Dyes

A few years ago, Martha Stewart recommended some recipes for natural easter egg dyes that are no longer on her website. Since I can’t link to them, here they are.

Martha suggests making dyes separately, then soaking boiled eggs for various periods of time to achieve the desired colors. Eggs can be soaked in more than one dye to acheive desired colors.

Select your dyestuff and place it in a pot, using the amounts given below.

  • Red-cabbage dye: 4 cups chopped
  • Turmeric (a spice) dye: 3 tablespoons
  • Yellow onion-skin dye: 4 cups (skins of about 12 onions)
  • Beet dye: 4 cups chopped
  • Coffee dye: 1 quart strong black

Add 1 quart of water and 2 tablespoons white vinegar to the pot. If more water is needed to cover ingredients, add more vinegar proportionally. Bring to a boil and lower then lower heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain the dye into a bowl and allow to cool to room temperature.

  • Pale Yellow: Soak eggs in turmeric dye for 30 minutes.
  • Orange: Soak eggs in onion-skin dye for 30 minutes.
  • Light Brown: Soak eggs in black coffee dye for 30 minutes.
  • Light pink: Soak eggs in beet dye for 30 minutes.
  • Light blue: Soak eggs in cabbage dye for 30 minutes.
  • Royal blue: Soak eggs in cabbage dye overnight.
  • Lavender: Soak eggs in turmeric dye for 30 minutes, then cabbage dye for 30 minutes.
  • Chartreuse: Soak eggs in turmeric dye for 30 minutes, then beet dye for 5 seconds.
  • Salmon: Soak eggs in turmeric dye for 30 minutes, then beet dye for 30 minutes.

For more natural egg dye ideas, see

BACK TO DEBRA’S LIST: Food

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motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Doctor, Doctor, everyone keeps ignoring me. Next please!

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