Daily Stuff 7-25-18 Horn Fair

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. Minus Tide at 6:13 AM of -0.5 feet.

It’s grey and chill and there’s been a lot of fog. 51F and the wind at 2mph. Overcast at 400 feet. Hmmm… might be just the marine layer. How hot *was* it in the Valley? We should get some sun in the afternoon, at least.

Yesterday started slowly. With Tempus puttering at the shop and dropping questions on me every so often, I put off working on newsletters or OCPPG stuff until I could concentrate.

I got some time in while he took another (the last?) load of my garden plants to Rayna’s. When he got back, he napped for a little until I needed to leave for a meeting. It was supposed to be business owners and discussing events like Halloween and Christmas, but Ruth (Family Fabrics) and I were the only ones there, so we just chatted. It was nice to get some time to connect. We’re always working!

When I got back there was a lovely salad waiting for me on the table and he had headed for Newport. I got back to work on newsletters and by midnight had the basics done for the week. …and then the computer glitched and I had to save and close everything and re-start. <sigh> Well, I got that and at just about that point, Tempus called to say he was rolling at 12:20. By 2:50 he was starting Seal Rock and picked me up at 3:50. We were done at 5:55 after an uneventful run.

Today we’re going to sleep late. We’ll probably come in to the shop in the evening.

A photo by Ken Gagne of the Alsea Bay Bridge from 8/10/16.

760px-Blackface_ram_portrait

Today’s Feast is the Horn Fair in Ebernoe in England. It’s a centuries-old fair, although it got revived about 150 years ago, so probably in a different form than in centuries past. It seems to be another fair that the English Revolution put on hiatus for awhile. It features a cricket match, and a roasted sheep whose horns are gifted to the winners. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebernoe_Horn_Fair

plant pic flower false lily of the valleyToday’s Plant is False Lily of the ValleyMaianthemum dilatatum. It was eaten as a poverty food, and the berries won’t hurt you, but they aren’t particularly tasty, either. It was more used as a medicinal by the indigenous peoples, although modern medicine doesn’t substantiate the native uses. The leaves were eaten in spring as a purgative, leaves were made into poultices for scrapes and cuts and the roots were pounded to make a medicine for sore eyes. I don’t know of any magickal uses except against sterility. More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maianthemum_dilatatum and here:  http://academic.evergreen.edu/projects/gardens/longhouse/monographs/false_lillyofthevalley.htm

The shop opens at 11am. Summer hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon MagickThe waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/27 at 1:20pm.  Waxing Gibbous Moon – From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Keywords for the Gibbous phase are: analyze, prepare, trust. It is the time in a cycle to process the results of the actions taken during the First Quarter. During this phase you are gathering information. Give up making judgments; it will only lead to worry. Your knowledge is incomplete. Laugh. Analyze and filter. LOOK WITHIN. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, but in the uncommitted phase, the Warriors – Associated God/desses: Dion, Dionysius, Venus, Thor. Phase ends at the Full on 7/27 at 1:20pm. 

Then on Tuesday evening the 24th the Moon pairs up with Saturn, Jupiter’s farther-off relative.
The nearly full Moon shines between Saturn, about a fist at arm’s length to its right after darkness is complete, and bright Mars about two fists to the Moon’s lower left (for North America).
A diagram showing the phases of Venus, printed in Popular Science Monthly in 1909. – Popular Science Monthly Volume 75
Venus dominates the western sky after sunset. The dazzling object shines at magnitude –4.3 among the background stars of southern Leo. The planet appears 11° high an hour after sundown and sets shortly after 10 p.m. local daylight time. When viewed through a telescope, Venus appears 19″ across and 60 percent lit.
Jupiter (magnitude –2.2, in Libra) shines in the south-southwest in twilight. It’s between Spica about 20° to its right or lower right, and the head of Scorpius about 20° to its left. Catch Jupiter with your scope in late twilight before it gets low.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky Map for July 2018 https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-star-chart-july-2018
Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992 Runic half-month of Thurisaz/ Thorn/Thunor, 7/29-8/12 – Northern Tradition honors the god known to the Anglo-Saxons as Thunor and to the Norse as Thor. The time of Thorn is one of ascendant powers and orderliness. This day also honors the sainted Norwegian king, Olaf, slain around Lammas Day. Its traditional calendar symbol is an axe.

Sun in Leo
Moon in Capricorn
Vesta (8/1), Mars (8/27), Saturn (9/6), Pluto (9/30), Neptune (11/24), Chiron (12/8) Retrograde
Color – White

©2018 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.
Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
W   25      Low   6:13 AM    -0.5   5:56 AM     Set  4:04 AM      91
~    25     High  12:45 PM     5.8   8:49 PM    Rise  7:30 PM
~    25      Low   5:57 PM     2.8
~    25     High  11:46 PM     7.5

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – I listen to my Inner Voice.

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Journal Prompt – Auto-Biographical narrative – Have you had an experience that made you feel close to nature?

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Quotes

~  If you aren’t having fun in your religion, then you’re either doing your religion wrong or doing the wrong religion. – Phoenix McFarland
~  Opportunity dances with those on the dance floor. – Anonymous
~  The truth you believe and cling to, makes you unavailable to hear anything new. – Pema Chodron
~  The past cannot be changed. The future is yet in your power. – Hugh White

See what delights in sylvan scenes appear!
Descending Gods have found Elysium here.
In woods bright Venus with Adonis stray’d,
And chaste Diana haunts the forest shade. – –Alexander Pope (1688–1744)

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Lughnasadh Magick – Lore

Pagan Studies LAMMAS: The First Harvest
Once upon a Lammas Night
When corn rigs are bonny,
Beneath the Moon’s unclouded light,
I held awhile to Annie…

Although in the heat of a Mid-western summer it might be difficult to discern, the festival of Lammas (Aug 1st) marks the end of summer and the beginning of fall. The days now grow visibly shorter and by the time we’ve reached autumn’s end (Oct 31st), we will have run the gamut of temperature from the heat of August to the cold and (sometimes) snow of November. And in the midst of it, a perfect Mid-western autumn.

The history of Lammas is as convoluted as all the rest of the old Folk holidays. It is of course a cross-quarter day, one of the four High Holidays or Greater Sabbats of Witchcraft, occurring 1/4 of a year after Beltane. However, British Witches often refer to the astrological date of Aug 6th as Old Lammas, and folklorists call it Lammas O.S. (‘Old Style’). This date has long been considered a ‘power point’ of the Zodiac, and is symbolized by the Lion, one of the ‘tetramorph’ figures found on the Tarot cards, the World and the Wheel of Fortune (the other three figures being the Bull, the Eagle, and the Spirit). Astrologers know these four figures as the symbols of the four ‘fixed’ signs of the Zodiac, and these naturally align with the four Great Sabbats of Witchcraft.

Christians have adopted the same iconography to represent the four gospel-writers. ‘Lammas’ was the medieval Christian name for the holiday and it means ‘loaf-mass’, for this was the day on which loaves of bread were baked from the first grain harvest and laid on the church altars as offerings. It was a day representative of ‘first fruits’ and early harvest.

In Irish Gaelic, the feast was referred to as ‘Lugnasadh’, a feast to commemorate the funeral games of the Irish sun-god Lugh.

However, there is some confusion on this point. Although at first glance, it may seem that we are celebrating the death of the Lugh, the god of light does not really die (mythically) until the autumnal equinox. And indeed, if we read the Irish myths closer, we discover that it is not Lugh’s death that is being celebrated, but the funeral games which Lugh hosted to commemorate the death of his foster- mother, Taillte. That is why the Lugnasadh celebrations in Ireland are often called the ‘Tailltean Games’.

The time went by with careless heed
Between the late and early,
With small persuasion she agreed
To see me through the barley…

One common feature of the Games were the ‘Tailltean marriages’, a rather informal marriage that lasted for only ‘a year and a day’ or until next Lammas. At that time, the couple could decide to continue the arrangement if it pleased them, or to stand back to back and walk away from one another, thus bringing the Tailltean marriage to a formal close. Such trial marriages (obviously related to the Wiccan ‘Handfasting’) were quite common even into the 1500’s, although it was something one ‘didn’t bother the parish priest about’. Indeed, such ceremonies were usually solemnized by a poet, bard, or shanachie (or, it may be guessed, by a priest or priestess of the Old Religion).

Lammastide was also the traditional time of year for craft festivals. The medieval guilds would create elaborate displays of their wares, decorating their shops and themselves in bright colors and ribbons, marching in parades, and performing strange, ceremonial plays and dances for the entranced onlookers. The atmosphere must have been quite similar to our modern-day Renaissance Festivals, such as the one celebrated in near-by Bonner Springs, Kansas, each fall.

A ceremonial highlight of such festivals was the ‘Catherine wheel’. Although the Roman Church moved St. Catherine’s feast day all around the calendar with bewildering frequency, it’s most popular date was Lammas. (They also kept trying to expel this much-loved saint from the ranks of the blessed because she was mythical rather than historical, and because her worship gave rise to the heretical sect known as the Cathari.) At any rate, a large wagon wheel was taken to the top of a near-by hill, covered with tar, set aflame, and ceremoniously rolled down the hill. Some mythologists see in this ritual the remnants of a Pagan rite symbolizing the end of summer, the flaming disk representing the sun-god in his decline. And just as the sun king has now reached the autumn of his years, his rival or dark self has just reached puberty.

Many commentators have bewailed the fact that traditional Gardnerian and Alexandrian Books of Shadows say very little about the holiday of Lammas, stating only that poles should be ridden and a circle dance performed. This seems strange, for Lammas is a holiday of rich mythic and cultural associations, providing endless resources for liturgical celebration.

Corn rigs are bonny!
I’ll not forget that happy night
Among the rigs with Annie!

Lughnasadh Incense Recipes
2 tsp Heather
1 tsp Frankincense
1 tsp Apple Blossoms
1/4 tsp Blackberry leaves
1/4 tsp wood base
1/8 tsp salt petre

Self-burning, no charcoal need. Do place on sand to burn.

Lammas Potpourri
20 drops clove bud oil
23 drops sandalwood oil
1 cup oak moss
2 cups dried pink rosebuds
2 cups dried red peony petals
1 cupdried amaranth flowers
1 cup dried heather flowers
1/2 cup dried cornflowers.

Mix the clove bud and sandalwood oils with the oak moss and then
add the remaining ingredients. Stir the potpourri well and store in a
tightly covered ceramic or glass container.

From GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives 2002

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Silliness – Juggling Test

A juggler who was driving to his next performance was stopped by the police. “What are those knives doing in your car?” asked the officer.
“I juggle them in my act.”
“Oh yeah?” says the cop. “Let’s see you do it.” So the juggler starts tossing and juggling the knives.
A guy driving by sees this and says, “Wow, am I glad I quit drinking. Look at the test they’re making you do now!”

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