Daily Stuff 9-18-18 Samuel Johnson

Hi, folks!

Open Circle for Mabon Friday, 9/21. 7pm.

There’s a lot of cloud up there. The computer says it’s sunny, and it mostly is in town, but right now there are no shadows because something’s blocking the light. 60F, Wind at 11mph, gusting to 19, AQI 19, humidity at 76%, which just feels nice! It looks like rain on Friday evening into Saturday.

Yesterday was more than a bit of a slog to get through. We had a lot of chores to do, plus bills to pay. I was writing most of the day while Tempus rumpussed around, but there were decisions to be made about what was going to storage, etc. I also had some unpacking and putting away to do, plus to get the pictures. That’s why the Sunday newsletter got redone, late in the day.

When we got back to the apartment we had more packing to do and Tempus ran another load to the shop in the middle of the night, planning on taking it to storage this afternoon, which is where he is heading.

Today the estate agent came to the apartment to look over the library and to pull what he could, out. We had to be there to tell him what was ours, of course, so we’re only just at the shop. I’ve been embroidering and reading a new herb book….new to me, anyway.

Tonight’s the paper run!

Slavic Harvest headdress

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220px-Samuel_Johnson_by_Joshua_ReynoldsToday is the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Samuel Johnson (born 9/18/1709 d. 12/13/1784), English lexicographer (A Dictionary of the English Language). He was the son of a poor bookseller, and grew up in poverty (which haunted him the rest of his life). Despite his humble origins, after Shakespeare he is the most quoted person in the English language. More in Wikipedia:   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Samuel_Johnson .

Pseudotsuga_menziesii_cone douglas firToday’s Plant is the Douglas FirPseudotsuga menziesii, sometimes called Oregon Pine, since it’s actually a pine, not a fir at all. They are commonly used as Christmas trees, since they hold their needles better than many other trees, and are one of the better timber trees, growing quickly with a straight grain. Their main use, magickally, is in incense, since the resin has a good sweet scent. –Mars, Air/Fire – Attracting prosperity, purifying ritual areas and new homes, helping “stay the course” during difficult times. A wand or cone kept on the altar wards off evil influences. Carry cones to increase fertility and have a vigorous old age. Floor washes with the oil cleanse a space of negativity and ward off illness. Throw needles into winter fires for protection, or burn as incense for purification and divination. Place branches over the bed to keep sickness away, or to aid the ill. Hang a branch over the main door of your house to ensure continuous joy within.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudotsuga_menziesii

The shop opens at 11am. Summer hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 9/24 at 7:52pm. Waxing Gibbous Moon – From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Keywords for the Gibbous phase are: analyze, prepare, trust. It is the time in a cycle to process the results of the actions taken during the First Quarter. During this phase you are gathering information. Give up making judgments; it will only lead to worry. Your knowledge is incomplete. Laugh. Analyze and filter. LOOK WITHIN. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, but in the uncommitted phase, the Warriors – Associated God/desses: Dion, Dionysius, Venus, Thor. Phase ends at the Full on 9/23 at 7:52am. 

As the Moon waxes through first quarter, it moves eastward daily over Jupiter, Scorpius, Saturn, and the Sagittarius Teapot.

Now, at dusk, the Moon forms the top of a triangular bridge with Mars to its left and Saturn to its right.

How soon after sunset can you see the big Summer Triangle? Face southeast and look high. There’s Altair, currently the triangle’s bottom point. Vega, the Triangle’s brightest star, is nearly at the zenith (as seen from mid-northern latitudes). Deneb is a bit farther to Altair’s upper left.

Although autumn arrives with the equinox this coming weekend, the Summer Triangle remains prominent in the evening sky. Look high in the west after darkness falls and your eyes will fall on the brilliant star Vega in the constellation Lyra the Harp. At magnitude 0.0, Vega is the brightest member of the Triangle. The second-brightest star, magnitude 0.8 Altair in Aquila the Eagle, lies some 35° southeast of Vega. The asterism’s dimmest member, magnitude 1.3 Deneb in Cygnus the Swan, stands about 25° east-northeast of Vega. For observers at mid-northern latitudes, Deneb passes through the zenith around 10 p.m. local daylight time, nearly 90 minutes after the last vestiges of twilight have disappeared.
Asteroid hunters have a great opportunity to spot Vesta in the vicinity of one of the Milky Way’s brightest star-forming regions this week. The 7th-magnitude minor planet resides in western Sagittarius, a region currently hosting the major planet Saturn. Vesta lies a few degrees southwest of Saturn. But of even more interest, the asteroid lies less than 2° southwest on the Lagoon Nebula (M8) tonight. On Friday evening, Vesta will slide 1° due south of the Lagoon.
Venus (magnitude –4.7) shines very low in the west-southwest in evening twilight and sets before twilight is over. Don’t confuse it with Jupiter, which will probably catch your attention first. Venus is to Jupiter’s lower right, and brighter. Their separation diminishes slightly this week, from 16° to 14°. In a telescope Venus is a striking crescent, about 30% sunlit and 36 arcseconds tall. For better telescopic seeing, catch it higher in a blue sky long before sunset.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky Map for September 2018 – https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-star-chart-september-2018
Goddess Month of Mala runs from 9/6 – 10/2
Celtic Tree Month of Muin/Vine  Sep 2 – 29 

Runic half-month of Kenaz/Ken/Kebo – September 13-27 – Ken represents a flaming torch within the royal hall, so it’s the time of the creative fire – the forge where natural materials are transmuted by the force of the human will into a mystical third, an artifact that could not otherwise come into being. The positive aspects of sexuality that are immanent in Freya and Frey come into play at this time. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, p. 102 

Sun in Virgo
Moon in Capricorn
Pluto (9/30), Neptune (11/24), Chiron (12/8), and Uranus (1/6/19) Retrograde
Color: Red

©2018 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Muin/Vine  Sep 2 – 29 – Muin  – (MUHN, like “foot”), vine – The grape (Vitis vinifera L.) is a vine growing as long as 35 m (115 feet), in open woodlands and along the edges of forests, but most commonly seen today in cultivation, as the source of wine, grape juice, and the grape juice concentrate that is so widely used as a sweetener. European grapes are extensively cultivated in North America, especially in the southwest, and an industry and an agricultural discipline are devoted to their care and the production of wine. Grapes are in the Grape family (Vitaceae).

Muin – Vine Ogam letter correspondences
Month: August
Color: Variegated
Class: Chieftain
Letter: M
Meaning: Inner development occurring, but take time for relaxation

to study this month – Koad – Grove – Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Many Shades of Green
Class: None
Letter: CH, KH, EA
Meaning: Wisdom gained by seeing past illusions.

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Tides for Alsea Bay

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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Tu  18      Low   2:27 AM     1.0   6:59 AM     Set 12:43 AM      58
~    18     High   9:12 AM     5.5   7:21 PM    Rise  4:10 PM
~    18      Low   2:33 PM     3.4
~    18     High   8:18 PM     6.4

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – The best way to predict the future . . . .        . . . .  is to create it.

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Journal Prompt – I wish… – I wish everyone loved……

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Quotes

~  He had not an ounce of superfluous flesh on his bones, and leanness goes a great way towards gentility. – Elizabeth Gaskell (1810-1865) English writer
~  A humble knowledge of thyself is a surer way to God than a deep search after learning. – Thomas a Kempis
~  You cannot conceive the many without the one. – Plato
~  If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton, you may as well make it dance. – George Bernard Shaw

Everybody today seems to be in such a terrible rush, anxious for greater developments and greater riches and so on, so that children have very little time for their parents. Parents have very little time for each other, and in the home begins the disruption of peace of the world. – Mother Teresa

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Mabon Magick – Crafts

Laminated Window Hangings for Mabon

you will need:
–  lined paper
–  laminating paper
–  crayons
–  Mabon cookie cutters(the big ones)
–  scissors & a single hole punch
–  a pencil
what to do:

  1. Lightly trace the shapes of vegetables or other Mabon figures with your pencil.
  2. Cut out those shapes with scissors.
  3. Colour in the shapes with your crayons lightly.
  4. Laminate the shapes with laminate paper, and cut off the excess edges, leave about 3mm extra laminate paper.
  5. Punch a hole through the top of the shape and hang it up in your window.

Granny’s Herbals Bringing Autumn Magic In – Adapted from Witch in the Kitchen, by Cait Johnson (Inner Traditions, 2001).

There’s nothing more luscious than inviting nature indoors in the Fall: the brilliant colors of Autumn make our homes feel deliciously warm and cozy as the weather turns cooler. Changing leaves, swags of grapevine, and vibrantly-colored apples and squashes make gorgeous, inexpensive decorations.

Find out how to connect with the abundant bounty and beauty of this harvest season with these fun, easy tips for decorating with nature:
1. Preserve some colorful leaves. You can iron them between sheets of waxed paper, microwave them for a few seconds, put them in a solution of glycerin, or press them between the pages of a heavy book. Then you can apply them to backsplashes, place them artfully in a vase, mound them around a pile of gourds or squashes, or even use them as coasters for your favorite beverages 2. Food is art. Find a local Farmer’s Market or roadside stand and load up on apples, pears, pumpkins, decorative squashes, nuts, gourds, and Native American corn. A simple wooden bowl loaded with these treasures makes an abundant centerpiece. You can parade them in a line on a mantel-piece or pile them in a basket. What you don’t eat, you can enjoy looking at.
3. Other treasures. Bring in grapevines to twine along the countertops, or make wreaths for doors or cabinets (see our article on making your own Inner Harvest Wreath). If you live in an area where bittersweet is not a protected plant, harvest some to put in an earthen vase Corn shocks are traditional to stand beside a door, but broom corn makes a beautiful and less usual alternative with its graceful russet fronds.
4. Beeswax candles. The amber color and honey-sweet aroma of these safe, all-natural candles just evoke the golden glow of autumn. As the days get shorter, it can be a soothing ritual to burn a beeswax candle at dusk.
5. Echo Fall colors. Bring in the Autumn hues of russet-red, vibrant shades of orange, deep greens, mellow golds, wine-reds, and vivid scarlet with cushions, towels, scatter-rugs, or other decorative accents. My family has a brightly-colored autumn leaf potholder and a set of pumpkin-shaped mugs that we use with pleasure year after year. Find the simple treasures your family
will enjoy.
6. Try this creative and relaxing Leaf Meditation. Find a perfect autumn leaf and spend some time really looking at it, noticing the variations in color and shape. Trace its outline on a piece of paper, then try your hand at coloring it in with colored pencils, markers, or paints. Slowing down and taking time to savor the beauty of something as simple and commonplace as a leaf opens our eyes and hearts to nature’s magical variety. You may want to cut your colored leaf out and glue it on the cover of a journal to keep you company throughout the autumn months. Or do several leaves to decorate your cabinets or walls!
7. Think water. Western European traditions often associate Autumn with the element of water, since it is a time of deep feeling and flowing away: birds migrate, trees shed their leaves. Honor this ancient idea with a bowl of water in a special place. Notice how water evaporates. As you refill your bowl throughout the autumn months, give a little thought to your own feelings, and the things that you are in the process of releasing from your life.

Granny’s Herb Course http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GrannysHerbs/

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Silliness – Both nuts

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