Daily Stuff 10-5-18 Chief Joseph Surrenders

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. First Minus Tide of the cycle at 4:02 AM of -0.1 feet.

It’s starting to rain. This isn’t likely to be much of a storm, just a taste. They’re predicting a bit over 1/2 an inch of rain and winds to maybe 25mph. Right now it’s 49F with the wind at 5mph and after today, there’s almost no chance of rain for another week.

Yesterday it was awfully late when the newsletter went out. Tempus had a bread loaf done not long after that and I got the bolete cut up and in the dehydrator while it was cooling. He heated up some of the tortellini soup and we had it with some of his good bread. I had been working on the watermelon rind pickle after he got the rind washed. I had to make a flying guess at how much I had. I was experimenting with doing it in a crock pot, to. Some year I’ll learn to read the recipes through before I start!

After supper I was working on pictures, having done some more work on newsletter files. Eventually, I was doing some writing and then stopped to play for awhile. Tempus headed for Newport at about 8:15, intending to do some shopping before starting with the newspapers. By then I was getting sleepy again.

I napped a couple of times while he was gone, but was back up around 6am. He was having a pretty good run, nothing in particular delaying him, except for the need to double bag that got him started on the regular route later than it’s been.

He got done at 6:50. I had long since finished the watermelon pickle and put away the dried mushrooms, but the syrup from the pickles was still going in the crockpot because I couldn’t reach a jar for it.

Today we’re both going to be very sleepy, I’m afraid. The shop will open at 11, and we’re back to the same old stuff, trying to whittle down the mess.

A picture from 10/3/16 of the Yachats Valley and some Oreo cows as weather was closing in by Ken Gagne.

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240px-Chief_Joseph-1877Chief Joseph Surrenders, 1877: At Eagle Creek in Bear Paw Mountains, Montana, Nez Percé leader Chief Joseph (In-mut-too-yah-lat-lat – Thunder coming up over the land from the water), surrendered his rifle to General Nelson A Miles after months in which his starving band eluded pursuing federal troops. Only 40 miles and they would have been over the Canadian border…  “From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.” More info here:  http://www.turtletrack.org/Issues03/Co11012003/CO_11012003_Honor_Respect.htm

ArnicaArnica Montana – mountain arnica, mountain daisy, mountain tobacco, fall dandelion, leopard’s bane, Wolf’s Bane (not the aconitum variety with the same name), Dumbledore’s Delight are all names for this herb. 1-2 foot tall hairy stems bear bunches of bright yellow daisies in the summer and autumn. Use flowers and upper stems either fresh of dried slowly. Roots dug up in late autumn or spring can be used after drying in artificial heat. Treatments for osteoarthritis, sprains and bruising have been scientifically proven to be effective, but it is also used to treat epilepsy and blood pressure, throat infections, wounds and paralysis – Feminine, Saturn, Leo, Sacred to Hecate,-  this has been called one of the 3 herbs of witchcraft. Use to increase psychic powers and in amulets for healing and protection. Image by Franz Eugen Köhler, Köhler’s Medizinal-Pflanzen – List of Koehler Images, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=255279

The shop opens at 11am. Fall hours are 11am-6pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon MagickFrom the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 10/8 at 8:47pm. Hecate’s Brooch 3-5 days before New Moon – Best time for Releasing Rituals. It’s the last few days before the new moon, the time of Hecate’s Brooch. This is the time that if you’re going to throw something out, or sweep the floors, or take stuff to Good Will, do it! Rid yourself of negativity and work on the letting go process. Release the old, removing unwanted negative energies, addictions, or illness. Do physical and psychic cleansings. Good for wisdom & psychic ability. Goddess Aspect: Crone – Associated God/desses: Callieach, Banshee, Hecate, Baba Yaga, Ereshkigal, Thoth. Phase ends at the Dark on 10/7 at 8:47am. 

The waning crescent Moon passes Leo in early dawn.

These evenings the Great Square of Pegasus stands high in the east, still tipped onto one corner. It’s a little larger than your fist held at arm’s length. From its left corner runs the line of three similarly bright stars marking the main line of Andromeda. As evening grows late, the Square’s upper-right side points far down to Fomalhaut on the rise (four or five fists distant).
The Moon reaches perigee, the closest point in its orbit around Earth, at 6:31 p.m. EDT. It then lies 227,665 miles (366,392 kilometers) from Earth’s center. At the same time the Moon is at perigee, Regulus, the brightest star in the constellation Leo the Lion, lies 1.9° south of our lone natural satellite.

The MESSENGER spacecraft first flew by Mercury in January 2008, before going into orbit around the solar system’s innermost planet between 2011 and 2015. These images created with MESSENGER data provide some of the strongest evidence to date for the existence of water ice and frozen volatiles trapped in Mercury’s shadowed polar craters. – NASA/JHUAPL/Carnegie Institution of Washington/NAIC, Arecibo Observatory/Science Source

Mercury is hidden in the glare of the Sun.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky Map for October – https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-star-chart-october-2018
Goddess Month of Hathor runs from 10/3 – 10/30
Celtic Tree Month of Gort/Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27 
Runic half-month of Gebo/ Gyfu – Sept 28-Oct 12 – Gyfu represents the unity that a gift brings between the donor & recipient. It is a time of unification, both between members of society and between the human and divine. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, p. 102

Sun in Libra
Moon in Leo enters Virgo at 4:19pm
Venus Retrograde at 12:04pm (11/16)
Neptune (11/24), Chiron (12/8), and Uranus (1/6/19) Retrograde
Color: Coral

Harvest 10/4-5

©2018 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Gort/Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27 – Gort – (GORT), ivy – Ivy (Hedera helix L.) is also a vine, growing to 30 m (100 feet) long in beech woods and around human habitations, where it is widely planted as a ground cover. Ivy produces greenish flowers before Samhain on short, vertical shrubby branches. The leaves of these flowering branches lack the characteristic lobes of the leaves of the rest of the plant. Like holly, ivy is evergreen, its dark green leaves striking in the bare forests of midwinter. Ivy is widely cultivated in North America. It is a member of the Ginseng family (Araliaceae).

Gort – Ivy Ogam letter correspondences
Month: September
Color: Sky Blue
Class: Chieftain
Letter: G
Meaning: Take time to soul search or you will maake a wrong decision.

to study this month Uilleand – Honeysuckle Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Yellow-white
Class: Peasant
Letter: P, PE, UI
Meaning: Proceed with caution.

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Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
F    5      Low   4:02 AM    -0.1   7:19 AM    Rise  2:56 AM      23
~     5     High  10:34 AM     6.9   6:50 PM     Set  5:25 PM
~     5      Low   4:25 PM     2.2
~     5     High  10:14 PM     7.5

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – The best way to gain self-confidence is to do what you are afraid to do.

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Journal Prompt – What do you think? – When you close your eyes and think of where you want to live, what comes to the surface? Specifically, what do you want your space to look like? And what do you think that reflects about you?

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Quotes

~  This is the sort of little-boy, stamp your foot stuff which comes from a financial yuppie when you shoe him into parliament.  – Paul Keating on Liberal Party leader John Hewson
~  I cannot conceive otherwise than that He, the Infinite Father, expects or requires no worship or praise from us, but that He is even infinitely above it. – Benjamin Franklin; from ‘Articles of Belief and Acts of Religion’, November 20, 1728
~  It’s just a job. Grass grows, birds fly, waves pound the sand. I beat people up.- Muhammad Ali
~  I give you this to take with you: Nothing remains as it was. If you know this, you can begin again, with pure joy in the uprooting.” – ? Judith Minty

The splendor falls on castle walls
And snowy summits old in story:
The long light shakes across the lakes,
And the wild cataract leaps in glory.
Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying,
Blow, bugle; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying.

O hark, O hear! how thin and clear,
And thinner, clearer, farther going!
O sweet and far from cliff and scar
The horns of Elfland faintly blowing!
Blow, let us hear the purple glens replying:
Blow, bugle; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying.

O love, they die in yon rich sky,
They faint on hill or field or river:
Our echoes roll from soul to soul,
And grow for ever and for ever.
Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying,
And answer, echoes, answer, dying, dying, dying. – Alfred Tennyson, British poet laureate, died on October 5, 1892; from ‘The Princess’, Chapter III

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Samhain Magick – Lore

SAMHAIN

Samhain marks one of the two great doorways of the Celtic year, for the Celts divided the year into two seasons: the light and the dark, at Beltane on May 1st and Samhain on November 1st. Some believe that Samhain was the more important festival, marking the beginning of a whole new cycle, just as the Celtic day began at night. For it was understood that in dark silence comes whisperings of new beginnings, the stirring of the seed below the ground. Whereas Beltane welcomes in the summer with joyous celebrations at dawn, the most magically potent time of this festival is November Eve, the night of October 31st, known today of course, as Halloween.

Samhain (Scots Gaelic: Samhuinn) literally means “summer’s end.” In Scotland and Ireland, Halloween is known as Oíche Shamhna, while in Wales it is Nos Calan Gaeaf, the eve of the winter’s calend, or first. With the rise of Christianity, Samhain was changed to Hallowmas, or All Saints’ Day, to commemorate the souls of the blessed dead who had been canonized that year, so the night before became popularly known as Halloween, All Hallows Eve, or Hollantide. November 2nd became All Souls Day, when prayers were to be offered to the souls of all who the departed and those who were waiting in Purgatory for entry into Heaven. Throughout the centuries, pagan and Christian beliefs intertwine in a gallimaufry of celebrations from Oct 31st through November 5th, all of which appear both to challenge the ascendancy of the dark and to revel in its mystery.

In the country year, Samhain marked the first day of winter, when the herders led the cattle and sheep down from their summer hillside pastures to the shelter of stable and byre. The hay that would feed them during the winter must be stored in sturdy thatched ricks, tied down securely against storms. Those destined for the table were slaughtered, after being ritually devoted to the gods in pagan times. All the harvest must be gathered in — barley, oats, wheat, turnips, and apples — for come November, the faeries would blast every growing plant with their breath, blighting any nuts and berries remaining on the hedgerows. Peat and wood for winter fires were stacked high by the hearth. It was a joyous time of family reunion, when all members of the household worked together baking, salting meat, and making preserves for the winter feasts to come. The endless horizons of summer gave way to a warm, dim and often smoky room; the symphony of summer sounds was replaced by a counterpoint of voices, young and old, human and animal.

In early Ireland, people gathered at the ritual centers of the tribes, for Samhain was the principal calendar feast of the year.   The greatest assembly was the ‘Feast of Tara,’ focusing on the royal seat of the High King as the heart of the sacred land, the point of conception for the new year. In every household throughout the country, hearth-fires were extinguished. All waited for the Druids to light the new fire of the year — not at Tara, but at Tlachtga, a hill twelve miles to the north-west. It marked the burial-place of Tlachtga, daughter of the great druid Mogh Ruith, who may once have been a goddess in her own right in a former age.

At at all the turning points of the Celtic year, the gods drew near to Earth at Samhain, so many sacrifices and gifts were offered up in thanksgiving for the harvest. Personal prayers in the form of objects symbolizing the wishes of supplicants or ailments to be healed were cast into the fire,  and at the end of the ceremonies, brands were lit from the great fire of Tara to re-kindle all the home fires of the tribe, as at Beltane. As they received the flame that marked this time of beginnings, people surely felt a sense of the kindling of new dreams, projects and hopes for the year to come.

The Samhain fires continued to blaze down the centuries.  In the 1860s the Halloween bonfires were still so popular in Scotland that one traveler reported seeing thirty fires lighting up the hillsides all on one night, each surrounded by rings of dancing figures, a practice which continued up to the first World War. Young people and servants lit brands from the fire and ran around the fields and hedges of house and farm, while community leaders surrounded parish boundaries with a magic circle of light. Afterwards, ashes from the fires were sprinkled over the fields to protect them during the winter months — and of course, they also improved the soil. The bonfire provided an island of light within the oncoming tide of winter darkness, keeping away cold, discomfort, and evil spirits long before electricity illumined our nights. When the last flame sank down, it was time to run as fast as you could for home, raising the cry, “The black sow without a tail take the hindmost!”

Even today, bonfires light up the skies in many parts of the British Isles and Ireland at this season, although in many areas of Britain their significance has been co-opted by Guy Fawkes Day, which falls on November 5th, and commemorates an unsuccessful attempt to blow up the English Houses of Parliament in the 17th century. In one Devonshire village, the extraordinary sight of both men and women running through the streets with blazing tar barrels on their backs can still be seen! Whatever the reason, there will probably always be a human need to make fires against the winter’s dark.

Divination at Halloween

Samhain was a significant time for divination, perhaps even more so than May or Midsummer’s Eve, because this was the chief of the three Spirit Nights. Divination customs and games frequently featured apples and nuts from the recent harvest, and candles played an important part in adding atmosphere to the mysteries. In Scotland, a child born at Samhain was said to be gifted with an dà shealladh, “The Two Sights” commonly known as “second sight,” or clairvoyance.

Apple Magic – At the heart of the Celtic Otherworld grows an apple tree whose fruit has magical properties. Old sagas tell of heroes crossing the western sea to find this wondrous country, known in Ireland as Emhain Abhlach, (Evan Avlach) and in Britain, Avalon. At Samhain, the apple harvest is in, and old hearthside games, such as apple-bobbing, called apple-dookin’ in Scotland, reflect the journey across water to obtain the magic apple. 

Dookin’ for Apples – Place a large tub, preferably wooden, on the floor, and half fill it with water. Tumble in plenty of apples, and have one person stir them around vigorously with a long wooden spoon or rod of hazel, ash or any other sacred tree.

Each player takes their turn kneeling on the floor, trying to capture the apples with their teeth as they go bobbing around. Each gets three tries before the next person has a go. Best to wear old clothes for this one, and have a roaring fire nearby so you can dry off while eating your prize!
If you do manage to capture an apple, you might want to keep it for a divination ritual, such as this one:

The Apple and the Mirror – Before the stroke of midnight, sit in front of a mirror in a room lit only by one candle or the moon. Go into the silence, and ask a question. Cut the apple into nine pieces. With your back to the mirror, eat eight of the pieces, then throw the ninth over your left shoulder. Turn your head to look over the same shoulder, and you will see and in image or symbol in the mirror that will tell you your answer.

(When you look in the mirror, let your focus go “soft,” and allow the patterns made by the moon or candlelight and shadows to suggest forms, symbols and other dreamlike images that speak to your intuition.)

Dreaming Stones – Go to a boundary stream and with closed eyes, take from the water three stones between middle finger and thumb, saying these words as each is gathered:

I will lift the stone
As Mary lifted it for her Son,
For substance, virtue, and strength;
May this stone be in my hand
Till I reach my journey’s end.

(Scots Gaelic)
Togaidh mise chlach,
Mar a thog Moire da Mac,
Air bhrìgh, air bhuaidh, ‘s air neart;
Gun robh a chlachsa am dhòrn,
Gus an ruig mi mo cheann uidhe.

Carry them home carefully and place them under your pillow. That night, ask for a dream that will give you guidance or a solution to a problem, and the stones will bring it for you.

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Silliness – High Blood Pressure

Kendra had to go in and have her yearly physical done. When Dr. Sam remarked on her extraordinarily ruddy complexion, Kendra replied, “High blood pressure, Doc. It comes from my family.”
“Your mother’s side or your father’s?” Dr. Sam inquired.
“Neither,” Kendra replied. “It’s from my husbands family.”
“Oh, come now,” Dr. Sam said. “How could your husband’s family give you high blood pressure?”
Kendra sighed, “You oughta meet ’em sometime, Doc!”

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