Daily Stuff 11-17-18 Leonids

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. Shop closing at 4:30 today!

Bright sunshine again! Hoping that folks are going to take advantage of the good weather while it lasts. 50F, wind at 3mph, AQI back down to 16.

I got a lot done before I pooped out mid-afternoon, yesterday. Mostly it was filling in newsletter files, but I also got a few more bits organized in the beads and findings stuff. I have 3 more organizers to hang up… or rather I have 3 more organizers for *Tempus* to hang up!

We traded places at that point. I slept for awhile and he worked on his computer (I think) and helped customers. That’s two days running that I fall asleep and he makes a big sale. Maybe I ought to sleep more often? 🙂

When I woke, he got us some supper while I worked on the shopping list and then we headed for Newport. The Moon was shining with a golden haze around it, quite a bit to the left of Mars, unlike last night. The stars were obvious once we were out of the city lights and as we came into Newport you could see a layer of fog just below the level of the bridge, then past the bridge it was pretty foggy.

We got our shopping done and I saw a mug that my mother would have loved. It brought me to tears. No moms or dads, kids are probably going to be elsewhere for the holidays…. No Jeanne…. So I wept my little weep once I was in the car.

Once we were back we spent a few minutes checking for answers on mail and then got going on some of the cookery. I have the start of the pottage, the kuba and the cabbage rolls, and made 4 bean pickles (white, black, kidney, chickpea) and a mustard/mushroom pickle, plus an onion butter.

There was a Northrup/Grumman launch out of Dulles VA on NASA Live TV, so I watched that. An Antares rocket and the Cygnus payload for the ISS. …and then I went to bed. I was wiped. Unfortunately, I didn’t stay asleep. I ended up with only about 5 hours worth. Argh! …and today is a day when I have to keep going!

Tempus and I have to get the last of the plants shifted this morning. I’m having one of those, “I have socks somewhere. I have a headband somewhere. What did I do?” mornings… He’s getting coffee because he’s not much better. We were going to start on sorting the fridge stuff before we opened, but I’m not sure that’s going to happen. …and we’re closing around 4:30 or so, because we’re heading for Eugene for an event this evening.

Quoting Ken Gagne on 11/14/14, “The 3 Tenors were performing this afternoon at the Sea Lion Docks down at the Newport Bay Front and they gave quite a performance.”

plant pic flower Rhododendron_macrophyllum_biscuit_june_2005Today’s plant is the Rhododendron genus, specifically the wild rhodys that we have out here, the Pacific rhododendron, Rhododendron macrophyllum. Rhodys have native forms in much of the world (not South America or Africa) They are one of the showiest of the flowers with hybrids and cultivars all over the place, including the azaleas which fall into this genus, but there are some that you wouldn’t recognize having almost no flowers at all! The plant is toxic to many animals and honey made from some of plants will make you ill. ,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron Our rhodys out here are lovely during their bloom time, when you see a hit of pink here and there along highways and trails and in the woods and then within days drifts and swathes and whole hillsides are pink! It’s a hardy plant, which grows well in disturbed places, particularly areas that were burned over. It will re-grow from the scorched roots!   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_macrophyllum – There aren’t any magickal references to rhododendrons that I’ve found, which doesn’t make any sense, since at least the cultivated ones are all over! Azaleas stand for Temperance in the language of flowers. Yellow rhododendron, native to Sibera, is use for rheumatism, gout and syphilis. My personal uses for them are for glamourie, beauty and outward show, but also for the learning to make these unnecessary by creating inward beauty and serenity. When these flowers are in season I use the fresh ones as a “notice me!” spell.

LeoThe Leonid meteor shower happens around this time each year. The radiant is the constellation Leo and they’re associated with the comet Temple/Tuttle (many meteor showers are “leftovers” from comets) The peak of Leonid’s visibility is around November 17. There is a spike every 33 years above the normal levels of about 50 ‘shooting stars’ an hour. More here: and here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonids

The shop opens at 11am. Winter hours are 11am-5pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 11/22 at 9:39pm. Waxing Gibbous Moon – From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Keywords for the Gibbous phase are: analyze, prepare, trust. It is the time in a cycle to process the results of the actions taken during the First Quarter. During this phase you are gathering information. Give up making judgments; it will only lead to worry. Your knowledge is incomplete. Laugh. Analyze and filter. LOOK WITHIN. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, but in the uncommitted phase, the Warriors – Associated God/desses: Dion, Dionysius, Venus, Thor. Phase ends at the Full on 11/21 at

Venus and Spica appear close together in the southeast in early dawn all week.

When you see the waxing gibbous Moon passing highest in the south in early evening tonight, it’s straight below the Great Square of Pegasus, which is level and upright.

A meteor during the 2009 Leonid Meteor Shower. – WikiMedia Commons

The Leonid meteor shower, which has been very weak this decade, should be at its modest best late tonight during the three hours between moonset and the beginning of Sunday’s dawn. Have patience.With the waxing gibbous Moon setting before 2 a.m. local time and morning twilight beginning after 5 a.m., skywatchers have more than three hours for undisturbed viewing. The meteors radiate from the constellation Leo the Lion, which climbs more than 60° high in the southeast before dawn. Observers under a dark sky could see an average of between 15 and 20 meteors per hour. Leonid meteors come from tiny dust particles ejected by periodic comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle during its innumerable passes through the inner solar system. When these bits of debris slam into Earth’s atmosphere at 44 miles per second, friction with air molecules incinerates them and produces the bright streaks. [We saw an early Leonid on the paper run early Friday morning!]
Mercury fades and drops out of sight in the sunset this week.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky Map for November – https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-star-chart-november-2018
Goddess Month of Cailleach/Samhain runs from 10/31 – 11/27.
Celtic Tree Month of Ngetal/Reed  Oct 28 – Nov 24 

Runic half month of Naudhiz/ Nyd /Nauthiz – November 13- 27 – Need-fire – Time to prepare for winter. Consciousness is the Necessity. “That which does not destroy me makes me stronger.” – Nietzsche

Sun in Scorpio
Moon in Pisces
Mercury (12/6), Neptune (11/24), Chiron (12/8), Juno (12/23), and Uranus (1/6/19) Retrograde
Color: Indigo

Planting 11/16-17

©2018 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Ngetal/Reed  Oct 28 – Nov 24 – nGéadal – (NYEH-dl), reed – The term “reed” is used with great imprecision in North America, but it is clear that the reed of the ogham is the common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel). This is a giant grass, with stems as high as 4 m (13 feet). It grows in marshy areas, where it often forms dense stands. Like most other grasses, the vertical stems live only a single year, dying in the autumn and being replaced with new green shoots in the spring. The dead stems rattle and whisper in late autumn winds. Common reed has spread as a weed throughout the world; in North America it is widespread in cooler climates. Common reed is in the Grass family (Poaceae, or Gramineae). “The Reed Month, is said by some to be most favorable for communication with ancestral spirits and the strengthening of all family ties, with magickal associations with fertility, love, protection, and family concerns. ‘Thin and slender is the Reed. He stands in clumps at the edge of the river and between his feet hides the swift pike awaiting an unsuspecting minnow to come his way. In his thinness the reed resembles arrows that fly, silver-tipped, up into the unknown air to land at the very source that one had searched for all these years. Firing arrows off into the unknown is an expression of the desire to search out basic truths. If you loose off without direction, the place of landing will be random. If the firing off is carried out with the correct conviction, determination and sense of purpose, then the act becomes secondary to the event that comes both before ~and after the moment.'”   Source: Earth, Moon and Sky

Ngetal – Reed Ogam letter correspondences
Month: October
Color: Grass Green
Class: Shrub
Letter: NG
Meaning: Upsets or surprises

to study this month Mor – the Sea Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Blue-green
Class: none
Letter: AE, X, XI, M

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Tides for Alsea Bay

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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Sa  17      Low   1:31 AM     1.5   7:15 AM     Set 12:59 AM      61
~    17     High   8:14 AM     6.8   4:47 PM    Rise  2:32 PM
~    17      Low   2:35 PM     2.8
~    17     High   8:03 PM     5.8

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – In the Name of the All-Mother: I will be mentor or friend to someone in need today.

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Journal Prompt – Schoolish Stuff – List the ways that you could help to improve the environment in your neighborhood or community.

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Quotes

~  We are the people who run this country. We are the deciders. And every single day, every single one of us needs to step outside and take some action to help stop this war. Raise hell. – Molly Ivins, American newspaper columnist, political commentator, and best-selling author, born on August 30, 1944; ‘Stand Up Against the “Surge”‘, January 12, 2007
~  No form of art goes beyond ordinary consciousness as film does, straight to our emotions, deep into the twilight of the soul. – Ingrid Bergman
~  They now ring their bells, but they will soon wring their hands. – Robert Walpole, born in 1676; remark on the declaration of war with Spain, 1739
~  Memories are hunting horns whose sound dies on the wind.- Guillaume Apollinaire, born in 1880; ‘Cors de Chasse’

Over the river and through the wood—
Now grandmother’s cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin-pie! – Lydia Maria Child (1802–80)

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Magick –  Turkey Day Bits 3

Did you Know?
Thanksgiving – November 28, 2002 (This was from a newsletter, now defunct)
The first American Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621, to commemorate the harvest reaped by the Plymouth Colony after a harsh winter. In that year Governor William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving. The colonists celebrated it as a traditional English harvest feast, to which they invited the local Wampanoag Indians.

Days of thanksgiving were celebrated throughout the colonies after fall harvests. All thirteen colonies did not, however, celebrate Thanksgiving at the same time until October 1777. George Washington was the first president to declare the holiday, in 1789.

By the mid-1800s, many states observed a Thanksgiving holiday. Poet and editor Sarah J. Hale lobbyied for a national Thanksgiving holiday. During the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln, looking for ways to unite the nation, discussed the subject with Hale. In 1863 he gave his Thanksgiving Proclamation, declaring the last Thursday in November a day of thanksgiving.

In 1939, 1940, and 1941 Franklin D. Roosevelt, proclaimed Thanksgiving the third Thursday in November. Congress passed a joint resolution in 1941 decreeing that Thanksgiving should fall on the fourth Thursday of November.

Did you Know?
A lot of what we learned in grade school and even high school is “history made simple.” Here is some information about Pilgrims you may not know.

“Mainstream Englishmen considered the Pilgrims to be deliberate religious dropouts who intended to found a new nation completely independent from non-Puritan England. In 1643 the Puritan/Pilgrims declared themselves an independent confederacy, one hundred and forty- three years before the American Revolution. They believed in the imminent occurrence of Armegeddon in Europe and hoped to establish here in the new world the “Kingdom of God” foretold in the book of Revelation. They diverged from their Puritan brethren who remained in England only in that they held little real hope of ever being able to successfully overthrow the King and Parliament and, thereby, impose their “Rule of Saints” (strict Puritan orthodoxy) on the rest of the British people. So they came to America not just in one ship (the Mayflower) but in a hundred others as well….”

The Puritans were not just simple religious conservatives persecuted by the King and the Church of England for their unorthodox beliefs. They were political revolutionaries who not only intended to overthrow the government of England, but who actually did so in 1649! (To learn about that, read about Cromwell who became, “Lord Protector of England.”)

In 1621 the Plymouth colonists and the Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast which is now known as the first Thanksgiving. The only two items that historians know for sure were on the menu are venison and wild fowl, which are mentioned in primary sources.

Did you Know?
Foods that were available to the pilgrims at the time were:
SEAFOOD: Cod, Eel, Clams, Lobster
WILD FOWL: Wild Turkey, Goose, Duck, Crane, Swan, Partridge, Eagles
MEAT: Venison, Seal
GRAIN: Wheat Flour, Indian Corn
VEGETABLES: Pumpkin, Peas, Beans, Onions, Lettuce, Radishes, Carrots
FRUIT: Plums, Grapes
NUTS: Walnuts, Chestnuts, Acorns
HERBS and SEASONINGS: Olive Oil, Liverwort, Leeks, Dried Currants, Parsnips

Foods that may not have been available were:
HAM: There is no evidence that the colonists had butchered a pig by this time, though they had brought pigs with them from England.
SWEET POTATOES/POTATOES: These were not common. (Southern food.)
CORN ON THE COB: Corn was kept dried out at this time of year.
CRANBERRY SAUCE: The colonists had cranberries but no sugar at this time.
PUMPKIN PIE: It’s not a recipe that exists at this point, though the pilgrims had recipes for stewed pumpkin.
CHICKEN/EGGS: We know that the colonists brought hens with them from England, but it’s unknown how many they had left at this point or whether the hens were still laying.
MILK: No cows had been aboard the Mayflower, though it’s possible that the colonists used goat milk to make cheese.

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Silliness – Free Meat

It was many years ago since the embarrassing day when a young woman, with a baby in her arms, entered his butcher shop and confronted him with the news that the baby was his and asked what was he going to do about it? Finally he offered to provide her with free meat until the boy was 16. She agreed.
He had been counting the years off on his calendar, and one day the teenager, who had been collecting the meat each week, came into the shop and said, “I’ll be 16 tomorrow.”
“I know,” said the butcher with a smile, “I’ve been counting too, tell your mother, when you take this parcel of meat home, that it is the last free meat she’ll get, and watch the expression on her face.”
When the boy arrived home he told his mother.
The woman nodded and said, “Son, go back to the butcher and tell him I have also had free bread, free milk, and free groceries for the last 16 years and watch the expression on his face!”

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