Daily Stuff 3-14-19 Mamuralia

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. Open Circle for Ostara, Wednesday, March 20, 7pm, Ancient Light.

Bright sunshine! Why is it hard to say something about gorgeous days than rainy, sloppy ones?  54,3,24,3

Facebook being down yesterday was kinda weird. I got the newsletter frames done and put away some of the stuff that Tempus got at the store the night before. I discovered that a number of the plants that are where my new plant shelves were supposed to go in last fall, and didn’t, are now dead from lack of watering. <gah> I spent quite awhile sorting papers. Business stuff, but it’s gotta be done, and this time I year I’m still making folders.

Eventually we had some lunch. Tempus makes a lovely fried egg sandwich. I had some baked potatoes going in a crockpot, but they weren’t anywhere nearly done. I worked on back on the flour shelves and then made an attempt to put away some spices out of one of the boxes. The potatoes weren’t done until nearly midnight and Tempus had to put them into the convection oven at that, but they were awfully tasty.

Tempus and I went to sleep, or he did. For some reason my asthma kicked up and it was nearly 6am before I finally got to sleep, so I’m awake awfully late again, today…. seems like this whole week.

Tempus has talked to one of our boys on the phone and had a number of customers to deal with, so I  need to get caught up. I’m trying to clean up the office space so it doesn’t look so awful.

A Ken Gagne photo from 3/12 of a wave “explosion” on the Yaquina Bay North Jetty.

AmanitasToday’s plant is the Fly Agaric,  Amanita Muscaria, the “toadstool” of fairy tales. It’s easily recognizable with its bright red and white cap. Poisonous and hallucinogenic, it’s a favorite of the weirder Fae and a common decoration for Yule trees….for which a lot of people have come up with odd reasons. It probably is an ancient enough association with the time of year that people have forgotten, but there may be a connection through reindeer, shamanism and Odin to Santa Claus and the other gifting deities…. you *can* use the dried mushroom in amulets for vision quests, just don’t eat the darned thing! More here: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Amanita_muscaria

Pi Day is observed on 3/14. In 2015 Pi Day had special significance on 3/14/15 (mm/dd/yy date format) at 9:26:53 a.m. and also at p.m., with the date and time representing the first 10 digits of π. Lots of events on this day are because of the Pi/Pie homophone. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi_Day

feast 0314 Mamuralia mosaic_calendar_MarchThe Mamuralia was an ancient Roman Feast representing the transition from the old to the new year.  More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mamuralia  The story goes that Mamurius was commissioned by the rulers of Rome to make 11 exact replicas of the shield of Mars that had fallen from the sky. He did and asked to be remembered in a hymn that was sung on this day for centuries….

The shop opens at 11am. Winter hours are 11am-5pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

******

Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 3/20 at 6:43pm Waxing Crescent phase – Keywords for the Crescent phase are: expansion, growth, struggle, opportunity. It is the time in a cycle that you gather the wisdom learned in the new phase and communicate your intention to move forward. Light a candle. Write or read an affirmation. LISTEN & ABSORB. Commit to your goal. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, energy and enthusiasm – Associated God/dess: Artemis & Apollo, Mayet/Djehuti, Freya/Frey. Phase ends at the Quarter on 3/14 at 3:27am. Waxing Gibbous Moon – From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Keywords for the Gibbous phase are: analyze, prepare, trust. It is the time in a cycle to process the results of the actions taken during the First Quarter. During this phase you are gathering information. Give up making judgments; it will only lead to worry. Your knowledge is incomplete. Laugh. Analyze and filter. LOOK WITHIN. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, but in the uncommitted phase, the Warriors – Associated God/desses: Dion, Dionysius, Venus, Thor. Phase ends at the Full on 3/19 at 9:43am.

First-quarter Moon; exactly so at 6:27 a.m. this morning. At nightfall about half a day later, can you see that the Moon’s terminator is no longer an exact straight line? After dark you’ll see that the Moon is in the feet of Gemini, high over Orion and just above the top of Orion’s very dim club (for North America).
You can find the First Quarter Moon high in the south as darkness falls, then watch as it sinks toward the western horizon over the next several hours. Our satellite officially reaches First Quarter phase at 6:27 a.m. EDT, and sharp-eyed observers might notice that Luna appears just a touch over halflit this evening. The Moon starts the evening among the background stars of northern Orion but passes into western Gemini by the time it sets.
The yellow-eyed flying bat asterism, visible in binoculars, resides in Leo Minor near Lynx. Its wingspan extends nearly across a binocular field of view. Find it to the upper right of Leo’s Sickle these evenings using Matt Wedel’s Binocular Highlight column and chart in the March Sky & Telescope, page 43. As he notes, “It only flies right-side up when Pollux and Procyon are crossing the meridian,” as they are now.
As midnight approaches, look to the east for the bright star <<<< Arcturus. At magnitude 0.0, it is the second-brightest star visible from mid-northern latitudes. If you scan about 20° to the left and a little below this luminary, you should see a conspicuous semicircle of stars: the constellation Corona Borealis >>>> the Northern Crown. It’s the most prominent group of stars having a shape reminiscent of a circle, and it makes a fitting target for Pi Day. (For you non-geeks, Pi Day is 3/14 because the first three digits of the mathematical constant pi are 3.14. Pi is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, so today we celebrate all things circular.)

The MESSENGER spacecraft first flew by Mercury in January 2008, before going into orbit around the solar system’s innermost planet between 2011 and 2015. These images created with MESSENGER data provide some of the strongest evidence to date for the existence of water ice and frozen volatiles trapped in Mercury’s shadowed polar craters. – NASA/JHUAPL/Carnegie Institution of Washington/NAIC, Arecibo Observatory/Science Source

Mercury reaches inferior conjunction, passing between the Sun and Earth, at 10 p.m. EDT. The innermost planet will return to view before dawn at the end of March.
Saturn (magnitude +0.6, in Sagittarius) glows in early dawn roughly midway between brighter Jupiter and low Venus.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky Map for February
Goddess Month of Moura, runs from 2/20-3/19
Celtic Tree Month of Nuin/Nion/Ash, Feb 18 – Mar 17, Nion (NEE-uhn)
Celtic Tree Month of Fearn/Alder, Mar 18 – Apr 14. Fearn (FAIR-n)
Runic half-month of Berkana/ Beorc, 3/14-29 Half-month ruled by the goddess of the birch tree; a time of purification for rebirth and new beginnings. 

Sun in Pisces
Waxing Quarter at 3:27am
Moon in Gemini enters Cancer at 2:49pm.
Mercury (3/28), Pallas Retrograde (5/30)
Color: Green

©2019 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

******

Celtic Tree Month of Nuin/Nion/Ash, Feb 18 – Mar 17, Nion (NEE-uhn), ash – the common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) is a major tree of lowland forests in much of Europe, along with oaks and beeches. It grows to 40 m (130 feet) in open sites, with a broad crown reminiscent of American elm trees. Ash was and still is an important timber tree, and is a traditional material for the handle of a besom. The common ash is occasionally cultivated in North America, and similar native ash species are widely grown as street trees. Ashes are members of the Olive family (Oleaceae).

Nuin – Ash Ogam letter correspondences
Month: March
Color: Glass Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: N
Meaning: Locked into a chain of events; Feeling bound.

Ogam letter correspondences to study this month Oir – Spindle Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: White
Class: Peasant
Letter: TH, OI
Meaning: Finish obligations and tasks or your life cannot move forward.******

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Th  14     High   6:11 AM     7.4   7:30 AM     Set  2:47 AM      43
14      Low   1:37 PM     0.8   7:21 PM    Rise 12:13 PM
14     High   8:15 PM     5.5

******

Affirmation/Thought for the Day – When you go outside today, look up in the sky (not at the sun) and contemplate its infinite spaciousness for a minute or two.

******

Journal Prompt – What is? – What is a place that inspires you?

******

Quotes

~   Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. – Abraham Lincoln (1809 – 1865), American president
~   The whole world is in jail and we’re plotting this incredible jailbreak. – Wavy Gravy (aka Hugh Romney; b. 1936; called by Paul Krasner “The illegitimate son of Harpo Marx and Mother Teresa.”)
~   Emancipate yourself from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds. – Bob Marley (1945 – 1981), Jamaican reggae singer/songwriter; ‘Redemption Song’
~   Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. – Martin Luther King, Jr (1929 – 1968), American human rights activist

The little white clouds are racing over the sky,
And the fields are strewn with the gold of the flower of March,
The daffodil breaks under foot, and the tasseled larch
Sways and swings as the thrush goes hurrying by. – –Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

******

Ostara Magick –

Coloring Springtime Eggs With Natural Dyes

http://www.dld123.com/about/about.php?id=A11 Debra Lynn Dadd

Spring is the time for the celebration of eggs, for, even though we are able buy eggs year-round in the supermarket, in Nature eggs are seasonal. The eggs that we eat today are mostly from domesticated birds, but for thousands of years people collected eggs from the wild for food. Before 1900, wild bird eggs were on the menu in restaurants. In the wild, birds and other animals lay eggs only during the time of year when the weather is such that the hatched babies can survive. So there are no eggs in winter, and eggs are then again plentiful with the coming of Spring.

I first became aware of the seasonality of eggs when I visited a neighbor who raises chickens. She told me that her chickens require 14 hours of sunlight to lay eggs and that commercial eggs in the wintertime come from chickens raised under electric lights. Hens naturally have an ongoing urge to lay eggs from spring to fall, when they lose their feathers. Then they wait through the winter until 14 hours of sunlight return in the spring. Of course, depending on where in the world these chickens are, the actual date the 14 hours or more of sunlight begins and ends is different from place to place. Even though eggs are available in the supermarket all year long, in the scheme of Nature, our bodies really are not designed to eat them every day.

She also told me that hens start laying eggs at about six months of age, which in hen-years is equivalent to our human adolescence. And they lay at a rate that is considered “productive” by the egg industry for about a year. As the hen gets older, she produces fewer and fewer eggs, but they are larger.

Celebrating spring with eggs

Though Easter, as a holiday, is the Christian celebration of Christ’s new life after crucifixion, its origin and customs are much older. Since the beginning of our species, humankind has celebrated the new life of Spring, particularly in parts of the world where winters are cold and food is scarce.

Indeed, the very word for the season — Spring — describes the action of Nature at this time. The origin of “spring” goes back to the Old High German springan, which means to jump and perhaps to the Greek sperchesthai, which means to hasten. Spring certainly is the time when plant seedlings and baby animals hasten to jump out into existence. A spring is a source of water issuing from the ground, a coiled wire that jumps back into it’s original size after being depressed, an act or an instance of leaping up or forward, a quality of resilience. To spring is to come into being, to leap or jump up suddenly.

And so Spring is about newness, and in particular, about new life leaping forth once again, making the egg–which is the embodiment of new life itself–the perfect symbol of Spring.

Though we may today celebrate the egg as a symbol of rebirth in forms ranging from the most popular–chocolate–to the most expensive–encrusted with diamonds–using the actual egg itself for our spring celebrations restores this symbol to it’s original form in Nature.

The tradition of coloring eggs

The tradition of coloring eggs for springtime celebrations has deep roots in ancient times. It might have begun with the gathering of wild eggs of different natural colors in the spring. Although many eggs are naturally white, eggs of almost every color of the rainbow are known. As animals were domesticated and more white chicken eggs were eaten, it may have then become the custom to dye the white chicken eggs to look like the colored eggs of wild birds.

Colored eggs were given as gifts by the ancient Greeks, Persians, and Chinese at their spring festivals, and used by early Christians as a symbol of Jesus’ Resurrection. As early as the Middle Ages, eggs were colored and given as gifts at the Christian celebration. After being forbidden during the solemn fast of Lent, eggs were reintroduced on Easter Sunday, both as part of the feasting and as gifts for family, friends, and servants.

Though nowadays most people color their eggs with egg kits that contain dyes made from petrochemicals, for millennia eggs were colored with plant materials found in Nature. Barks, roots, and leaves from many plants produce beautiful natural dyes.

Coloring eggs provides an opportunity to experiment with plant materials that grow in your region — perhaps even in your own backyard. If coloring eggs is an activity you enjoy, consider keeping a scrapbook from year to year that documents the dyestuff used and the colors it produced. Books on natural dyes for fabrics can give you clues for dyes for eggs.

In addition to coloring eggs with natural colors, you can decorate your eggs to look like bird eggs. Eggshells are often intricately marked with blotches, scrawls, streaks or speckles, generally concentrated in a ring around the large end of the egg. You can make eggs with your own “bird” speckles, or make eggs that celebrate the eggs of actual birds that live in your area.

This is a good opportunity to learn about your local birds and what their eggs look like. For some pictures of bird eggs, visit the The Provincial Museum of Alberta, which has an on-line field guide with over 300 egg images and the birds they become. In addition, they have a fascinating explanation about how and why eggs have different shapes, colors, and speckle patterns.

How to color eggs with natural dyestuffs

Here’s how to color eggs with some plant-based dyes you probably already have in your kitchen. I have been delighted with the results of the colors I have tried and my friends have been thrilled to receive them as springtime gifts. The colors are very unusual — gentle, earthy, soft, and very vibrant, without being harsh like the artificial dyes — and when I tell people the colors come from plant dyes, they always want to know the origin of each color.

Directions:

NOTE: When coloring eggs with natural dyestuffs, the eggs are cooked and colored at the same time, in contrast to coloring with using an artificial dye kit, which requires cooking the eggs prior to coloring.

  1. Put raw, white-shelled, organically-raised eggs in a single layer in a pan. Cover with cold water.
  2. Add a little more than a teaspoon of white vinegar.
  3. Add the natural dyestuff for the color you want your eggs to be. (The more eggs you are dying at a time, the more dye you will need to use, and the more dye you use, the darker the color will be.)
  4. Bring water to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  5. Quickly check the eggs for color by removing them from the dye liquid with a slotted spoon.

If the color is as desired, pour off the hot dye liquid and rinse them immediately in cold water to stop the eggs from cooking. Continue to change the water until it stays cool in the pot because the eggs are no longer releasing heat. Drain and allow eggs to cool in the refrigerator.

If you wish a deeper color, strain the hot dye liquid into a container, then rinse the eggs immediately in cold water to stop them from cooking. Continue to change the water until it stays cool in the pot because the eggs are no longer releasing heat. Drain the last of the cold water, then cover the eggs with the strained dye liquid. Add more water if necessary so that the eggs are completely covered. Put into the refrigerator immediately and keep eggs in the refrigerator until the desired shade is achieved. Overnight is good. Longer than about twelve hours some of the colors just get muddier instead of deeper, and the lighter shades are more vibrant.

  1. Remove the dyestuff you used to color the eggs.

Red – Pink — Recommended but I haven’t yet tried: lots of red onion skins, cranberry juice, or frozen raspberries.

Orange — Yellow onion skins will dye to a deep orange right in the dye pot. Use the skins of two medium onions for four eggs.

Brown — Red beet skins make a beautiful mahogany brown. Roast fresh beets at 350 degrees until soft (about one to two hours, depending on size). Peel off the skin and about 1/8″ of the beet. Reserve beets for eating (they are delicious roasted!) and add the skins to the dye pot. Use about one egg-size beet per egg. Allow to soak overnight. Grape juice produces a beautiful sparkling tan (I think the sparkles are from the high sugar content of the grape juice–this is one of my favorites!) Also recommended but I haven’t yet tried: coffee.

Yellow — Saffron makes a bright yellow when eggs are soaked overnight. Use about 1/4 teaspoon saffron threads for four eggs. Recommended but I haven’t yet tried: tumeric or cumin, orange or lemon peels, or celery seed.

Green — Recommended but I haven’t yet tried: spinach. Carrot tops and peels from Yellow Delicious apples produced a yellow-green.

Blue — Red cabbage leaves make the most incredible robin’s-egg blue. Use about a quarter of a medium head of cabbage, chopped, for four eggs. After the 15 minutes of boiling, the eggs are still almost white, but after soaking the eggs in the dye liquid for about six hours, they turn very blue. Frozen blueberries produce a kind of steel-grey-blue right in the cooking pot. Use 1 cup blueberries for four eggs.

Deep Purple — Red wine makes a beautiful burgundy color right in the cooking pot. Cover the eggs completely with undiluted red wine, and add the vinegar right to the wine. Recommended but I haven’t yet tried: hibiscus tea.

Tips for successful results:

  • Use filtered or distilled water. Chlorine and other chemicals will work against the dye, making it less intense. Buy distilled water or use your own filtered water.
  • For deeper colors, use more dyestuff or let the eggs soak longer.
  • For even coverage, cook eggs in a pot large enough to hold enough water and dyestuff to completely cover the eggs, even after some of the liquid has evaporated during the 15 minute of boiling.
  • Again, for even coverage, if you continue to soak the eggs in the refrigerator after cooking, make sure the eggs are completely covered with the dye liquid.
  • Blot the eggs dry or allow them to air dry, as for some colors the dye will rub off while still wet. On the other hand, if you wish to make a white pattern on the egg, you can rub off some of the dye for some colors immediately after cooking.
  • Make sure eggs of different colors are completely dry before piling them up in a bowl together, as wet dye from one egg can transfer to another.

Cold-dipped Egg Dyes

A few years ago, Martha Stewart recommended some recipes for natural easter egg dyes that are no longer on her website. Since I can’t link to them, here they are.

Martha suggests making dyes separately, then soaking boiled eggs for various periods of time to achieve the desired colors. Eggs can be soaked in more than one dye to acheive desired colors.

Select your dyestuff and place it in a pot, using the amounts given below.

  • Red-cabbage dye: 4 cups chopped
  • Turmeric (a spice) dye: 3 tablespoons
  • Yellow onion-skin dye: 4 cups (skins of about 12 onions)
  • Beet dye: 4 cups chopped
  • Coffee dye: 1 quart strong black

Add 1 quart of water and 2 tablespoons white vinegar to the pot. If more water is needed to cover ingredients, add more vinegar proportionally. Bring to a boil and lower then lower heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain the dye into a bowl and allow to cool to room temperature.

  • Pale Yellow: Soak eggs in turmeric dye for 30 minutes.
  • Orange: Soak eggs in onion-skin dye for 30 minutes.
  • Light Brown: Soak eggs in black coffee dye for 30 minutes.
  • Light pink: Soak eggs in beet dye for 30 minutes.
  • Light blue: Soak eggs in cabbage dye for 30 minutes.
  • Royal blue: Soak eggs in cabbage dye overnight.
  • Lavender: Soak eggs in turmeric dye for 30 minutes, then cabbage dye for 30 minutes.
  • Chartreuse: Soak eggs in turmeric dye for 30 minutes, then beet dye for 5 seconds.
  • Salmon: Soak eggs in turmeric dye for 30 minutes, then beet dye for 30 minutes.

For more natural egg dye ideas, see

BACK TO DEBRA’S LIST: Food

 Dye Eggs the Natural Way – http://www.everythingeaster.com/story/naturaldye.html

Use vegetables, fruits and natural products to make colorful eggs this Ostara.

The stores are stacked with Ostara egg dyes and every year as a parent you have to pick the one your child will like and hope it works.

You get home set up all the messy dyes and begin working and many times the result is a bit disappointing. The eggs may not colour properly or the dye does not stick or the child is not happy with the results.

Forget the drugstore dyes and grab some stuff out of your refrigerator. There is a way to make colourful Ostara eggs from nature. It is a great way to teach your children to use ingredients from nature, and it should also be a fun and educational experience.

First you need ingredients which depend on the colour you are looking to achieve. The following is a list of colours and what ingredients you will need.

Pale Red – fresh beets or cranberries, frozen raspberries.
Orange – Yellow onion skins.
Light Yellow – Ground turmeric.
Pale green – Spinach leaves.
Green-gold – Yellow Delicious apple peels.
Blue – Canned blueberries or red cabbage leaves.
Beige to brown – strong brewed coffee

Now that you have the ingredients you need you follow this process and you will have colorful Ostara eggs dyed the natural way.

  1. Put eggs in a single layer in a pan. Pour water in pan until eggs are covered.
  2. Add about a teaspoon of vinegar.
  3. Add the natural dye appropriate to the colour you want your eggs to be ( the more eggs you are dying at a time, the more dye you will need ).
  4. Bring water to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  5. Remove the substance you used to colour the eggs. Put eggs in a bowl. If you want your eggs to be a darker shade, cover them with dye and let them stand overnight in the refrigerator.Copyright © 2003 EverythingHolidays.com, Inc.

Submitted By Akasha

******

Silliness – Why did the Chicken Cross the Road? Part 3 – How Some Pagan Authors Might Respond:

Margot Adler: The recent chicken resurgence, it can be argued, is directly based on a response to the suburban middle class experience. While I found that chickens-who-cross-roads who responded to my survey are of a wide range of ages and backgrounds, I discovered some trends in the “why” of crossing the road. For some it is was freedom. For some it is chickenism. Many chickens told me they crossed the road for intellectual satisfaction. One thing is clear: the growth of road crossing by chickens is expanding in the numbers of chickens and in the ways they cross the road, including at chicken festivals and for political blocking of roads.

Starhawk: The chicken crossed the road to reclaim the crossing experience, the experience of being fully alive, with streams and earth and rocks and road, in the fullness of her chickenhood after thousands of years of roosterarchy. The chicken crossing the road—not a chicken laying eggs, not a chicken being roasted and eaten—a chicken strong and free, crossing the road, this is something I can believe in. We chickens, as chickens, can empower ourselves to live in harmony with the Earth who gives life to all chickens and Who has been terribly scratched by roosters. Exercises: Dance the Spiral Chicken.

Issac Bonewits: Real crossing-the-road, we have seen, is a very interwoven and complicated subject. Our conclusion could be that real crossing-the-road is the build up of chicken emotion in conjunction with chicken concepts to vary the modulation of chicken energy so as to effect the modulation of the road’s energy. That’s all! Perhaps it is unfortunate, though, to use the word “chicken” in relation to it, since the “C” word is being used now in a way it was never used before in the English language and is an utterly meaningless term without a qualifying adjective. And this, of course, is the fault of the medieval Christian Church, through the Gothic Chickens it invented and used as the basis of persecuting men, women and chickens. The word “chicken” itself comes from an Indo-European root, “cheeka/e” meaning “one who lays eggs,” and it has no relation to the later Anglo-Saxon word for “wise spirit of flight,” as so often stated by certain contemporary “Chiccans.” An’Chk’Rrhod (“Our Own Chickens on Our Own Roads”), an authentic Neo-Chicken Rooster tradition, offers the best of paleo-, meso- and neo- Chickenism …

Llewellyn’s Practical Chicken Magick Series: To some people, the idea that “chickens crossing the road” is practical comes as a surprise. It shouldn’t. The whole idea of Crossing the Road is practical for chickens. While Crossing the Road is also, and properly so, concerned with spiritual growth and psychological transformation –the “why” of crossing the road– every chicken’s life must rest firmly on material roads. Crossing the Road is the flowering of chicken potential. And the profits from publishing all those books on how to do so? Well, that ain’t chicken feed…

Carlos Castenada: 4/10/1964 I spent 14 hours, without food or water, sitting on the dirt and under the sun in front of Don Juan’s house, grinding chicken feed. I asked Don Juan if I could have a drink of water, and he told me that it was always this way, that a man who wanted to cross the road with the chicken cannot have any food or water till the chicken feed is ground. I asked Don Juan if the chicken is an ally, like the little smoke. Don Juan seemed to get angry and stayed silent. After I completed grinding the corn, I hallucinated from heat exhaustion, and Don Juan said I was ready. As I collapsed to my side, I spilled the chicken feed around me. A chicken appeared to be eating the feed around me, and I became strangely absorbed in the vision. I heard Don Juan’s voice tell me, “You must let the chicken cross the road into you. It is very painful, but for a man of knowledge it is easy.”

Scott Cunningham: A chicken passes between the grasses, clucking. The wind blows, and the chicken knows, *knows*, that this is the time. She puts her energy into taking the steps, in harmony with the gravel and the stones of the road. She is across; it is over, and the chicken stands in the field on the other side of the road. … Natural chicken crossing is unique among most other branches of the art of chicken road crossing. It doesn’t require years of collecting or fashioning coops, feeders or hen houses. Indeed, the most important tools of natural chicken crossing are free: the road, the chicken and you, your personal chicken power. You’re already familiar with it. You’ve felt it. You *are* a chicken. Crossing the road is you, with your chicken need. And, you can do it on your own. After all, who initiated the first chicken?

Janet and Stewart Farrar: Since so many editions of Gardner’s Chicken Book of Crossings have appeared in print (some accurate, some not), we think it won’t “lay an egg” too much if we clearly present “The Chicken Crossing Rite,” especially if we do so after two and half pages of well researched introduction set in six-point type. In version A of the Chicken Crossing Rite, we find many pseudo-archaisms (e.g.,”Yea, Ye Anciente Rite of Ye Chiks and Ye Rodes is a moste powerful Crafting,taking thy athame…”); however, Doreen Valiente notes (in version C, which is what we present), and we agree, that underlying it all is a basic ritual for summoning the astral road through the spirit of the Chicken (drawn down in the person of the High Priestess, holding the black handled feed bin; of course, a second degree may assist or perform the rite when….

 “Seth”/Jane Roberts: Session 666; Wednesday, Dec. 2, 1969; 9:00 p.m.: Now, you create your own chicken, each of you individually and en masse. Your physical senses fool you into believing you are seeing a chicken crossing the road, when instead, the chicken has already crossed the road, and hasn’t even begun to cross the road. There is a probable chicken that never crossed the road as well. Further, because you each perceive a chicken, there is not only one chicken but, in fact, many different chickens. As I have said before, time is simultaneous. All probable versions of the chicken–past, present and future–exist at once in the spacious present. It is only because you *believe* [emphatically]that time is linear, with each moment followed by another in one-line kind of fashion, that you perceive the chicken taking chicken steps to get to the other side of the road. It does no good to ask “Which came first, the chicken or the egg,” either, for they both exist at once in simultaneous time.

[9:10 p.m.] Now, there are families of chicken consciousness. All life seeks value fulfillment, for consciousness is consciousness. What you perceive as a chicken may be something far different in another reality. The chicken may, for example, be a fragment personality of your entity. The chicken is no less than you are, however, simply because it is a chicken. Now, the chicken has its reality, and you have your reality. But the chicken is more than a chicken [emphatically], and *you are more than you think that you are!* [Pause one minute]: The chicken crosses the road because it *believes* it can, and it does. It knows that it is sacred and that it will not die. You (underline ‘you’) also are sacred and you will not die. But as long as you believe that it is unsafe to cross the road, you must take chicken steps and obey the laws that you have agreed upon to get to the other side safely. [End at 9:30 p.m. Jane came out of trance easily. She didn’t remember a word she had spoken as Seth.]

Doreen Valiente: Old Chicken really did exist, and she really did cross the road. Gerald talked about her often, but she didn’t cross the road till before I began studying with Gerald. Still there are records of Old Chicken which confirm her reality. As for all the comments that Gerald had a “thing” for chickens, that is simply not true. The reason we worked with chickens is really quite simple: it worked!

Silver Raven Wolf: Although many times people have asked me why exactly the chicken crossed the road, I often wonder myself. My point is that every chicken comes to the road in a different way, and there is no one correct way for the chicken to get to the road to be crossed. The study of crossing the road is hard work if the chicken is going to develop any degree of proficiency. It is not something where you can just cluck yourself across the road. The first time my chicken crossed the road was for my chicken’s friend, whose rooster was being abusive. The chicken worked the steps for crossing the road after carefully considering all the reasons for crossing the road and all the steps she would have to take. Finally, my chicken just started clucking and flapping her wings and started across the road. When she reached the other side, her friend’s rooster was respectful! Afterwards, the chicken ate some corn to ground herself.

Posting address: faerie@groups.queernet.org
To contact list-administrator: faerie-owner@groups.queernet.org
Hosted by the QueerNet Project of Online Policy Group.

 

This entry was posted in Daily Stuff, Newsletter, Pagan, Wiccan and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.