Daily Stuff 7-4-19 Independence Day

Hi, folks!

Minus Tide at 8:42 AM  of -2.1 feet.

Bright sunshine and the earlier clouds seem to have wandered away. 63F, wind at 5mph and gusting, AQI24, UV8. There’s suddenly starting to look like a possibility of some measurable rain on Tuesday/Wednesday next week. The chance is still until 50% but they’re talking about 1/5 of an inch.

Yesterday was a long day, but busy and fun! The early part of the day was a little frustrating, since things took longer than we had expected to get things ready, but after that they just clicked on through.

We were fairly busy, since there were a lot of people in town for the day. I talked to folks from Idaho, Montana, Texas and Ohio as well as people from closer in.

The bag of stuff for the Queen’s Tea got picked up mid-afternoon. I’ll be getting the dishes back tomorrow. At that point I was working on the potato salad and Tempus got the grill set up and going.

We had brats and burgers, potatoes salad and chips and just sat and people-watched, when we weren’t working with customers. Amy was here from mid-afternoon on.

The fireworks were good, as usual, although I think their timers weren’t working as well as usual, since some of the display was clumped oddly.

We stayed open up until midnight, and our last customer came in the door at 5 of…..

We opened a few minutes late this morning, but we’ll be open at least until 7pm. We might go to the Yachats Big Band concert tonight and then the Yachats fireworks, but won’t know for sure until later in the day what we’re feeling like and whether I’ll be completely packed for tomorrow.

Yeah, I’m teaching my blackwork embroidery classes tomorrow down in Gold Beach, so I have to get all that together.

Despite it being Thursday, Tempus’ paper route isn’t until Friday night this week, so at least we’ll get a good night’s sleep.

Happy Independence Day!

The reading of the Declaration of Independence at Independence Hall. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSKOx8DKPIg

220px-Fourth_of_July_CakeToday’s feast is Independence Day in the USA. The Declaration of Independence was passed on July 2 and officially signed on August 2 (although a number of signers may have put their “John Hancocks” on the paper on July 4), but this is the date that it was made public. This morning I’ve been listening on NPR to people reading the Declaration from the Washington Mall. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Day_(United_States)

Sambucus_caerulea_7997Today’s plant is Blue ElderberrySambucus cerulea. It’s a rather wild shrub that can be trained into a small tree, with icky-smelling white flowers that then produce dark fruits that appear blue because of a whitish coating on them. In Oregon it grows mostly from the valley out to the coast with some isolated pockets in the Eastern part of the state. There’s a lot of folklore surrounding the tree. “In some areas, the “elder tree” was supposed to ward off evil influence and give protection from witches, while other beliefs say that witches often congregate under the plant, especially when it is full of fruit. In some regions, superstition, religious belief, or tradition prohibits the cutting of certain trees for bonfires, most notably in witchcraft customs the elderberry tree; “Elder be ye Lady’s tree, burn it not or cursed ye’ll be” – A rhyme from the Wiccan rede [poem]. If an elder tree was cut down, a spirit known as the Elder Mother would be released and take her revenge. The tree could only safely be cut while chanting a rhyme to the Elder Mother.” From Wikipedia – Feminine, Venus, Water – The flowers are used for Crossing the Bridge rituals. Carry for protection and to prevent rheumatism and toothache. Dried berries are helpful in sleep pillows. All parts are good for protection. Grow near the home for prosperity. Magic wands and flutes are often made from this wood.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sambucus_cerulea orhttp://en.wikipedia.org

The shop opens at 11am. Summer  hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/2 at 12:16pm. New Moon – The beginning of a new cycle. Keywords for the New phase are: beginning, birth, emergence, projection, clarity. It is the time in a cycle that you are stimulated to take a new action. During this phase the new cycle is being seeded by your vision, inner and outer. Engage in physical activity. Spend time alone. VISUALIZE your goals for the 29.6-day cycle ahead. The new moon is for starting new ventures, new beginnings. Also love and romance, health or job hunting. God/dess aspect: Infancy, the Cosmic Egg, Eyes-Wide-Open – Associated God/dess: Inanna who was Ereshkigal. Phase ends at 12:16am on 7/4. Diana’s Bow – On the 3rd day after the new moon you can (weather permitting) see the tiny crescent in the sky, the New Moon holding the Old Moon in her arms. Begin on your goals for the next month. A good time for job interviews or starting a project. Take a concrete step! God/dess aspect: Daughter/Son/Innocence – Associated God/dess: Vesta, Horus. Phase ends on 7/7 at 12:16am. 

As the Moon returns to the evening sky as a waxing crescent, is passes the difficult Mercury-Mars-Pollux-Castor lineup . . .

While evening twilight is still fairly bright, the thin waxing crescent Moon guides the way to the low line of Mercury, Mars, Pollux, and Castor as shown in the panel above. Bring binoculars!
Arcturus, the brilliant yellow-orange star high in the southwest after dark, is the leading light of Bootes the cowherd. The constellation’s brightest stars form a kite shape extending up from Arcturus. The kite is rather narrow, bent a bit left at the top, and 23° tall: about two fists at arm’s length. Arcturus is the narrow bottom point where the kite’s short little tail is tied on, fluttering toward the lower right.
Mercury and Mars are getting more difficult low in the west-northwest as twilight fades.  Your best opportunity to see Mercury and Mars this week comes in tonight’s early evening sky, when you can use the one-day-old waxing crescent Moon as a guide. Luna appears 5° high in the west-northwest a half-hour after sundown. Once you find it, use binoculars to spy magnitude 1.8 Mars 3° to its upper left. Mercury glows a bit brighter, at magnitude 1.4, some 4° to the Red Planet’s left.

Despite its name, the Summer Triangle remains on view in January’s early evening sky. The asterism’s brightest star, Vega, appears near the top of the image, while Deneb lies at lower left and Altair at lower right. In this scene, the triangle and the Milky Way stand above Yosemite Valley. Nevada Falls appears at the lower right of the picture with Vernal Falls below it. – Ruben Kier

No holiday better epitomizes summer in the United States than Independence Day. And the season’s namesake asterism — the Summer Triangle — will be on prominent display as fireworks ring out across the land. The trio’s brightest member, Vega in the constellation Lyra the Harp, stands nearly overhead in late evening. The asterism’s second-brightest star, Altair in Aquila the Eagle, then lies about halfway from the southeastern horizon to the zenith. Deneb, the luminary of Cygnus the Swan, marks the Summer Triangle’s third corner. Although it is this asterism’s dimmest star, it’s the brightest point of light in the northeastern sky.
If you ever thought the Sun’s distance controlled temperatures here on Earth, today should convince you otherwise. At 6 p.m. EDT, our planet reaches its most distant point from the Sun during 2019. At this so-called aphelion, the two lie 94.5 million miles (152.1 million kilometers) apart, some 3.1 million miles (5.0 million km) farther away than they were at perihelion in early January. The Northern Hemisphere’s warm temperatures at this time of year arise because the Sun passes nearly overhead at noon; during winter, the Sun traces a low path across the sky.
Mercury fades from magnitude 0.8 on the June 28th to 1.5 on July 6th. Mars is magnitude 1.8, Pollux is 1.2, and Castor is 1.6.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky map for June – https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-june-2019
Goddess Month of Rosea runs from 6/13 – 7/10
Celtic Tree Month of Duir/Oak, Jun 10 – Jul 7 
Runic New Year and half-month of Fehu/ Feoh, 6/29-7/13 Important in the runic year cycle, today marks beginning of the first rune, Feoh, sacred to Frey and Freya (Freyja), the lord and lady often worshipped in modern Wicca. It is the half-month of wealth and success. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Leo
Ceres (7/17), Jupiter (8/11), Saturn (9/18), Pluto (10/3) and Neptune (11/27)Retrograde
Color: White

©2019 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Duir/Oak, Jun 10 – Jul 7 – The oak of myth and legend is the common oak (Quercus robur L.). It is sometimes called the great oak, which is a translation of its Latin name (robur is the root of the English word “robust”). It grows with ash and beech in the lowland forests, and can reach a height of 150 feet and age of 800 years. Along with ashes, oaks were heavily logged throughout recent millennia, so that the remaining giant oaks in many parts of Europe are but a remnant of forests past. Like most other central and northern European trees, common oaks are deciduous, losing their leaves before Samhain and growing new leaves in the spring so that the trees are fully clothed by Bealltaine. Common oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America, as are the similar native white oak, valley oak, and Oregon oak. Oaks are members of the Beech family (Fagaceae). Curtis Clark

Duir – Oak Ogam letter correspondences
Month: May
Color: Black and Dark Brown
Class: Chieftain
Letter: D
Meaning: Security; Strength

to study this month – Eadha – White Poplar or Aspen Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Silver White
Class: Shrub
Letter: E
Meaning: Problems; Doubts; Fears.

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Tides for Alsea Bay

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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Th   4     High   1:35 AM     8.6   5:37 AM    Rise  7:43 AM      1
~     4      Low   8:42 AM    -2.1   9:04 PM     Set 10:57 PM
~     4     High   3:17 PM     6.7
~     4      Low   8:38 PM     2.3

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – I like it………

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Journal Prompt – What does this quote say to you? – Consider the postage stamp: Its usefulness consists in the ability to stick to one thing till it gets there. – Josh Billings

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Quotes

~   Nothing noble is done without risk. – Andre Gide
~   It does not take much strength to do things, but it requires great strength to decide on what to do. – Elbert Hubbard
~   He who trims himself to suit everyone will soon whittle himself away. – Raymond Hull
~   Creation begins in imagination and imagination begins in wonder. – Spike Humer

Great is the sun, and wide he goes
Through empty heaven with repose;
And in the blue and glowing days
More thick than rain he showers his rays. –Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–94)

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Lughnasadh Magick – Recipes

Harvest Bread Basket

Ingredients (suggested):

Instructions:

Bake each of these loaves, or any combination you prefer. (These have been chosen for this harvest recipe because they use bananas, corn, apples, and cheese, which are to some extent traditional foods for the harvest holidays.) Cut into strips or blocks that are easy finger-food size, and arrange in a basket–and take to a gathering or picnic! Bring sweet butter and honey!

When bringing this bread to a location where it will be in open air for more than a couple hours, it’s better to use a container that can be sealed! This container has a fitted lid.

NOTE: If you’re not such a masochist as to bake four loaves of bread on the same day, try getting into the holiday spirit by making a partial-week project out of it. I suggest baking the breads in this order: First banana bread, then apple, then cheese, then cornbread. Banana bread keeps the longest and stays moist for quite a long time without having to even be refrigerated. Apple bread stays good a long time too, but slowly becomes more mushy and less fluffy–try not to make this more than two days in advance of the date you’ll need it. Cheese bread, because it does have cheese, will spoil earlier–you’ll want this in an airtight container. And cornbread should be made a day in advance at the most for best freshness. Also, the cheese bread is the only one that requires rising time. The others are either flat breads (cornbread) or they do their necessary rising with the help of baking soda.

Banana bread and apple bread are very moist while cornbread and cheddar bread are drier breads, so keep this in mind when storing them in a shared container! A moist bread will “sog out” a dry bread and make it inedible if you don’t wrap them.

Baking bread is a wonderful harvest activity to put you in the mood for the season, so don’t be freaked by this recipe’s scope–give it a try!

Yield: 8-10 servings
Source: A combination! Use for: Lughnasadh, Mabon

Cheddar Cheese Bread

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 1 cup lukewarm milk (about 100ºF)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Just under 4 cups of flour–use until desired consistency
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 3 1/2 ounces mature cheddar cheese, grated

Instructions:

Combine the yeast and the milk and then stir, leaving for 15 minutes to dissolve. Meanwhile, melt the butter and let it cool. When it’s cool and the yeast is dissolved, add the butter to the yeast mix. Take out another bowl and combine the flour and the salt. Make a well in the middle of the dry mix and pour in the wet mix. (I suggest using three cups of flour and mix the salt into that, and then make the well, pour the wet in, and add more flour as needed. Add the flour until it’s a rough dough of a consistency that is easily kneaded.) Knead the bread dough on a floured surface until it’s smooth and elastic. Return the dough to the bowl, cover it with a towel, and let it rise in a warm spot until doubled, which will take anywhere from 2 to 3 hours.

Grease a 9 x 5 inch bread tin. Punch the dough down and knead in the last ingredient: The cheese. Knead it for a while to make sure that the cheese is distributed evenly throughout. Pick up the dough and twist it in the middle, curling the ends in also so that it will fit in the bread tin. Leave it in the warm spot again until the dough rises above the rim of the tin (45 minutes to an hour). Preheat the oven to 400º F, then bake the bread for 15 minutes. Lower the heat to 375º F and bake 15 to 30 minutes longer, until the bread can be turned out of the tin onto a rack and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom. Wait until cool before cutting.

NOTE: The original recipe was in a British book, so the measurements have been translated to American measurements for my easier use.

Yield: 1 loaf
Source: Martha Day, Complete Baking Use for: Lughnasadh, Mabon

Banana Bread

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) margarine or butter, softened
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 3/4 cup mashed ripe bananas (4-5 medium bananas)
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350ºF. Grease 2 loaf pans. In large bowl, cream the sugar and butter. Add in the eggs. Add bananas, milk, lemon juice, and vanilla, beat until smooth. In small bowl, mix flour, baking soda, and salt. Keep adding flour mix to banana mix. Pour into pans. Bake for 1 hour. Cool for 5 minutes.

Yield: 2 loaves
Source: Wood & Seefeldt, The Wicca Cookbook Use for: Mabon

Apple Bread

Ingredients:

For the bread:

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup margarine
  • 1/4 teaspoon butter flavoring
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 4 tablespoons sour milk
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups chopped apples
  • 1/2 cup chopped nuts

For the topping:

  • 2 tablespoons margarine, softened
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon burnt sugar flavoring

Instructions:

In a large mixing bowl, cream sugar, margarine, and butter flavor. In a small bowl, mix soda and milk, and stir. Add to the creamed mix. Beat in eggs and vanilla; add flour and salt. Fold in apples and nuts. Pour into a greased and floured 13 x 5 loaf pan. Drop teaspoons of topping over the batter. Bake at 350º F for 50 minutes; cool in pan for 10 minutes and cut into slices to serve.

Notes: First off this is an unusual sized pan; it’s a standard store loaf. Pans this size are hard to come by. You can possibly make a makeshift pan of this type–as I did–by creating a divider in a 13 x 9 baking pan (a lot more standard) and propping it up with small loaf pans to fit inside or some other way of dividing.

Also, I did not use butter flavoring; my milk was not sour; I did not use nuts; and for the topping I did not use “burnt sugar flavoring,” I just used a maple extract. It came out VERY yummy.

Variations: You can use pears instead of apples for a change, and try nutmeg or clove instead of cinnamon for whatever taste you prefer. Also, nuts are not necessary if you don’t like nuts–just put in a little less apple because you don’t have nuts to offset the moisture. You can also half this recipe and bake it in individual 6 x 3 mini loaf tins to get three baby loaves. If you do this, bake for only 30 minutes.

Yield: 1 long loaf
Source: The Eckert Family, Eckert Family Cook Book

Cornbread

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups yellow corn meal
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted

Instructions:

Preheat a greased 9×9 pan in a 425ºF oven for 20-22 minutes. Pour bread mixture into hot pan and place back in oven for 20 minutes. Serve hot with butter or honey.

Yield: 1 large loaf
Source: McCoy, The Sabbats Use for: Lughnasadh, Mabon

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Silliness – Your momma is so mean…

…she has no standard deviation.

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