Daily Stuff 7-13-19 John Dee

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. Minus Tide at 5:08 AM of -0.6 feet. Herbs at 11am. Sewing at 3pm.

Still lots of clouds, but it’s bright and shadows keep trying to arrive. They’re just not quite getting there, yet. , 62F, wind at 3mph, AQI12, UV8. It looks like our best chance for rain is on Thursday. Hey, there’s a shadow!

Yesterday’s promise of sun didn’t pan out. It just gradually greyed out, but it was nice and cool and not too windy and customers that came in weren’t trying to hide from the weather or wearing parkas, so what’s not to love?

Things just seemed to take more time than usual, yesterday. We had a fair number of customers in and they all seemed to shop for quite some time. Dealing with mail took longer than usual, even.

Tempus finally headed for Newport around 4pm and by 10pm he still wasn’t home. He fell asleep in the car in the Freddie’s parking lot, so we a couple of hours behind himself, but still. Yeah, that was a long list!

I did some embroidery and sewing and set up the next bottle of the sugared strawberries. …and I sat at the computer giggling helplessly for awhile. There was a post of a cow ambling along rt 34 and it just tickled me. Yes, the cow was returned home “and she’s grounded”, as of this morning. How many places do you know of where cows and peacocks are doing the “Great Escape”? 🙂

Tempus finally got in at 10:30. He started putting things away while I got another batch of the sugared strawberries taken care of and then started the mushroom catsup and sorted the veg for the stew that I’m going to be working on today. I also got a wedge of brie and some of the strawberries for a snack. He set things up for me to do some massive cookery today while putting everything else away.

Today we have Herbs at 11 and Sewing at 3.

When Tempus brought me my coffee I showed him the Silliness for today and the two of us sat here and giggled. It looks *too* much like the things that Arthur, Ricky and Sash pulled as little guys!

…and I have a ton of stuff to do today from cooking to herb headers to getting the birth sampler framed! We’ll be open at 11am.

…and Tempus just posted, “Ah, doughnuts, the sine qua non of a good and holesome breakfast …” <giggling helplessly>

A photo of an egret in Yachats, by Ken Gagne from 7/12/16

220px-John_Dee_Ashmolean

Today’s Feast is in honor of the birthday of John Dee, Renaissance mathematician and mage. He was Queen Elizabeth I’s personal astrologer, among many high-placed and well-remembered friends, but in magickal circles, he is most known for his studies with Edward Kelley and the Enochian language that came out of that. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dee

Today’s Plant is Stinging NettleUrtica Dioica, otherwise known as, “Ouch!!!!” Grab a handful of this plant and you will know it. There are lots of hollow “hairs” on this plant that act like tiny hypodermics, injecting histamine, among other stinging chemicals. There’s even a name for a type ofNettle Urtica_dioica0 allergic reaction called, “nettlerash”, that picked up the word for the characteristic pattern of itchy bumps. This plant has been used for food, medicine, fabric and magic for millenia. It is used as a pot herb and is one of the vegetables with the highest protein content. If you soak it in water or cook it the stings go away. In medicine it has traditionally been used to treat arthritis, dandruff and lack of milk in a nursing mother and there are a number of more modern medical uses. The fibers are suitable for making fabric and a related species has been used for over 6000 years to make a silky-looking textile called ramie, even though the processing takes a lot of effort. They are even used to make beer and cordials! – Masculine, Mars, Fire, Thor – Exorcism – for getting rid of nasty-minded Fae, plant nettles around your garden and barn. Protection – nettles in a pocket will keep a person safe from lightning and bestow courage. Nettles kept in a room will protect anyone inside. Lust – Nettles are reputed to enhance fertility in men and nettle tea is an aphrodisiac. Healing – fever can be dispelled by plucking a nettle up by its roots while reciting the names of the sick person and family. …and shirts made of fabric spun and woven from nettles feature as a girl’s quest tale in the Twelve Wild Swans.

The shop opens at 11am. Summer  hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

******

Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/2 at 12:16pm. Waxing Gibbous Moon From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Keywords for the Gibbous phase are: analyze, prepare, trust. It is the time in a cycle to process the results of the actions taken during the First Quarter. During this phase you are gathering information. Give up making judgments; it will only lead to worry. Your knowledge is incomplete. Laugh. Analyze and filter. LOOK WITHIN. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, but in the uncommitted phase, the Warriors – Associated God/desses: Dion, Dionysius, Venus, Thor. Phase ends at the Full on 7/15 2:38am. 

The Moon and Jupiter cross the sky together tonight, as shown above. Jupiter is 1,700 farther than the Moon at this month’s pairup of the two. In fact the Moon is roughly the size of Jupiter’s own four Galilean moons, mere pinpoints as seen in good, steadily braced binoculars or a small scope. This evening for North America, all four appear on Jupiter’s celestial west side relatively close to the planet. From North America, the two were closest this afternoon (when they were below the horizon), though they remain within 5° of each other after darkness falls. Despite Luna’s brilliance dominating the scene, you should have little trouble picking out the magnitude –2.5 planet to its right.

Pluto reaches opposition – The distant dwarf planet glows at 14th magnitude at its peak this week, and appears as a pinpoint of light even through the largest telescopes. The New Horizons spacecraft revealed a stunningly diverse world when it flew past four years ago, however. – NASA/JHUAPL/SwR

Mercury and Mars disappear into the sunset.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky map for July – https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-july-2019 
Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic New Year and half-month of Fehu/ Feoh, 6/29-7/13 Important in the runic year cycle, today marks beginning of the first rune, Feoh, sacred to Frey and Freya (Freyja), the lord and lady often worshipped in modern Wicca. It is the half-month of wealth and success. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992 Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Sagittarius
Ceres (7/17), Mercury (7/31), Jupiter (8/11), Saturn (9/18), Pluto (10/3) and Neptune (11/27), Chiron (12/12) Retrograde

Color: Blue

©2019 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

******

Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

******

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Sa  13      Low   5:08 AM    -0.6   5:44 AM     Set  3:10 AM      83
~    13     High  11:35 AM     5.6   9:00 PM    Rise  6:27 PM
~    13      Low   4:43 PM     2.6
~    13     High  10:45 PM     8.0

******

Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Accept the challenge that comes with the sunrise.

******

Journal Prompt – What is? – What is the hardest decision you have ever had to make? Looking back on your decision, do you now think you made the right choice? Explain your answer.

******

Quotes

~   The greatest gift you can give to somebody is your own personal development. I used to say, ‘If you will take care of me, I will take care of you.’ Now I say, ‘I will take care of me for you if you will take care of you for me.’ – Jim Rohn
~   The will to do, the soul to dare. – Sir Walter Scott
~   One of the things about equality is not just that you be treated equally to a man, but that you treat yourself equally to the way you treat a man. – Marlo Thomas
~   A life without love is like a year without summer. – Swedish Proverb

How many songs, O summer wind,
How many songs you know
Of fair, sweet things in your wanderings,
As over the earth you go. – Ina Donna Coolbrith (1841–1928)

******

Lughnasadh Magick – Lore

Lughnassadh Pagan Studies –
Also known as: Lammas, August Eve, The Festival of Bread, Elembiuos,
Lunasa, Cornucopia (Strega), Thingtide (Teutonic)
Date: August 1 or 2, or the first Full Moon of Leo
Symbols: All Grains, Breads, Threshing Tools, Berries (especially Blackberries)
Deities: Harvest and Grain Deities, New Mother Goddesses
Colors: Gray, Yellow, Gold, Green
Herbs: cornstalks, heather, frankincense, and wheat may be burned; acacia flowers, corn ears, hollyhock, myrtle, oak leaves, and wheat may be decorations.

Lughnassadh (Loo-NAHS-ah) is named for the Irish sun God, Lugh, and is usually looked upon as the first of the three Pagan harvest festivals.

Lughnasadh is primarily a grain harvest, one in which corn, wheat, barley and grain products such as bread are prominently featured. Fruits and vegetables which ripen in late summer are also a part of the traditional feast. The Goddess, in her guise as the Queen of Abundance, is honored as the new mother who has given birth to the bounty, and the God is honored as the Father of Prosperity.

The threshing of precious grain was once seen as a sacred act, and threshing houses had small wooden panels under the door so that no loose grain could escape. This is the original meaning of our modern word “threshold”.

From “Celtic Myth and Magick” by Edain McCoy

The following are a few suggestions for activities that may be incorporated into the Sabbat ritual or engaged in during the day.

Make sand candles to honor the Goddess and the God of the sea.

If you don’t live near a beach, you can achieve the same effect by putting sand in a large box, adding water, and working from there. This is definitely a porch or kitchen job, and newspapers are recommended under your work area for easy clean-up.

Melt wax form old candles (save the stubs from altar candles) in a coffee can set in a pot of boiling water. Add any essential oil you want for scent (or scent blocks from a candle supply store). Scoop out a candle mold in wet sand (you can make a cauldron by scooping out the sand and using a finger to poke three “feet”in the sand). Hold the wick (you can get these ready-made in arts and crafts stores) in the center and gently pour in the melted wax. Wait until it hardens, then slip your fingers under the candle and carefully lift it out and brush off the excess sand.

String Indian corn on black thread for a necklace.

If the Sabbat falls on a rainy day, you could collect rainwater in a glass or earthenware container, add dried mugwort, and use to empower objects.

Create and bury a Witch’s Bottle. This is a glass jar with sharp pointy things inside to keep away harm. You can use needles, pins, thorns, thistles, nails, and bits of broken glass; it’s a good way to dispose of broken crockery, old sewing equipment, and the pins that come in new clothes. Bury it near the entry to the house (like next to the driveway or the front door), or inside a large planter.Do a Harvest Chant when serving the corn bread at dinner:

The Earth Mother grants the grain,
The Horned God goes to his domain.
By giving life into her grain,
The God dies then is born again.

Make a Corn Dolly to save for next Imbolc. Double over a bundle of wheat and tie it near the top to form a head. Take a bit of the
fiber from either side of the main portion and twist into arms that you tie together in front of the dolly. Add a small bouquet of flowers to
the “hands,” and then you can decorate the dolly with a dress and bonnet (the dress and bonnet may be made out of corn husks if you
wish, or and cotton material is fine too).
Bake corn bread sticks. You can find a cast-iron mold shaped like little ears of corn in kitchen supply shops. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
1 cup flour
1/2 cup corn meal
1/4 cup of sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1/4 cup shortening
Sift dry ingredients together, add eggs, milk, and shortening, and beat until smooth. Pour into molds and bake for 20-25 minutes.
Collect blackberries and make a fresh pie marked with the Solar Cross.
Have a magickal picnic with libations to the earth of bread and wine.
Sprout wheat germ in a terra cotta saucer (these can be found in nurseries for use under terra cotta flower pots). The sprouts can be
added to homemade bread or used as an offering. Children enjoy planting the seeds and watching them grow, too.
God the grain,
Lord of rebirth.
Return in spring,
Renew the Earth.
Make a Solar Wheel or Corn Man Wheel:
Turn a wire hanger into a circle (standard circle material for wreaths too), keeping the hook to hang it by.
Make a small cardboard disk to glue the corn tips onto. You can decorate it with any design, for example, a pentagram or sun.
Place ears of Indian “squaw” corn (it is smaller than regualr corn and fits easily on a coat hanger) with the tips inthe center of the
circle and secure with hot glue to the cardboard disk. Use eight ears for a Solar Wheel, or five ears for a Corn Man. If all the ears of
corn meet just right you won’t need the disk, but if they are uneven the disk is helpful.
Wrap a bit of the husks of each ear around the wire on either side of the ear of corn, leaving some to stand out free from the corn.
Let dry overnight and hang on the front door. Activities taken from “Green Witchcraft” by Anne Moura (Aoumiel)

******

Silliness – …that one kid….

This entry was posted in Daily Stuff and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.