Daily Stuff 7-17-19 Anastasia

Hi, folks!

Minus Tide at 7:57 AM of -1.2 feet.

Today’s one of those “burn”  days when no one expects it because of the cloud cover! I saw a “lobster” walking down the street a little bit ago. It’s cloudy, but bright. 69F, wind at 6mph and gusting, AQI7, UV8. No rain last night, but they’re still talking about tonight, about a 50% chance of about 0.06 inches.

With the newsletter not going out until past 5 yesterday, the day started rather later than usual. By the time I was supposed to leave for the Full Moon Circle Tempus wasn’t back from the laundromat.

So we were late, but it wasn’t a biggie because the first couple of hours were very informal. Well, it wasn’t much in the way of a planned ritual. More tribal and informal than anything like what Rose of the Sea usually does. It was fun, anyway, although I didn’t participate all the much between being tired and trancing out and having to use the walker, and I managed to dump myself in the sand, twice.

There was a lot of drumming and dancing and somewhere around 50 people. Every so often I heard the ocean more than the people, despite how loud everyone got. One little fellow kept bringing me blueberries and popping them into my mouth. The littles had marshmallows on skewers and they insisted on setting them on fire. 🙂

The Moon rose during the ritual, but it wasn’t until we were heading home that we could see Her behind the buildings.

Leslie brought me back to the shop at about 11:30. I curled up and read and embroidered while I waited for Tempus.

We didn’t get up until 2pm and Tempus made us blueberry pancakes for brunch!

Today we have a lot of chores to whomp through and I’m really hoping to get a couple of boxes of things out into the mail.

Faces of the Divine

Today is the anniversary of the date of the deaths of the Russian Royal Anasig-1-family (the Romanovs) during the Bolshevik Revolution. Anastasia is the best known of the family at this point as the details have dropped from memory during the almost-century since the murders. Anastasia was the next-to-youngest in the family and was rumored to have survived the massacre. Alas, that has been proved to not be the case. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duchess_Anastasia_Nikolaevna_of_Russia  There is a possibility that her older sister Maria survived (and had been rumored to be Anastasia), although it hasn’t been proved. We’ll probably never know for certain.

plant pic Rhododendron_occidentale_StrybingToday’s Plant is the Western AzaleaRhododendron Occidentale. I talked a while back about the azaleas being a subset of the rhodys. This is the main one that grows around here. It’s hard to tell from the shape and size of the plant that it’s an azalea, or even from the flowers, although the branches are thinner and the leaves shorter and rounder than those of rhododendrons. It least it’s hard for those of us who are familiar with the showy garden hybrids, which tend to be small and compact. The other West Coast azalea is Rhododendron Albiflorum, and there’s not a whacking lot of info floating around about that one. The wiki is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_occidentale The Chinese call azaleas “thinking of home bush”. Magickal uses for azalea are to encourage light spirits, happiness and gaiety.

The shop opens at 11am. Summer  hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Full Moon – The day of, the day before, and day after the true Full Moon. “And better it be when the moon is full!”! Prime time for rituals for prophecy, for spells to come to fruition, infusing health and wholeness, etc. A good time for invoking deity. FRUITION Manifesting goals, nurturing, passion, healing, strength, power. Workings on this day are for protection, divination. “extra power”, job hunting, healing serious conditions Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. God/dess Aspect: Mother/Abundance/Kingship – – Associated God/desses: Danu, Cerridwen, Gaia, Aphrodite, Isis, Jupiter, Amon-Ra. Phase ends on 7/18 at 2:38am. Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/31 at 8:12pm. 

Though the Big Dipper is one of the most recognizable patterns in the sky, it is not officially a constellation, but rather an asterism.- Luis Evangelista

High in the northwest after dark, the Big Dipper has started its long, slow scoop toward the right. Lower in the north-northeast, meanwhile, the upright W of Cassiopeia has slowly begun to tilt and climb.

How soon after sunset can you see the big Summer Triangle? Face southeast and look high. There’s Altair, currently the triangle’s bottom point. Vega, the Triangle’s brightest star, is nearly at the zenith (as seen from mid-northern latitudes). Deneb is a bit farther to Altair’s upper left.

Perhaps no month better epitomizes summer in the Northern Hemisphere than July. And this month finds the season’s namesake asterism, the Summer Triangle, on prominent display. The trio’s brightest member, Vega in the constellation Lyra the Harp, stands nearly overhead shortly before midnight. The asterism’s second-brightest star, Altair in Aquila the Eagle, then lies more than halfway from the southeastern horizon to the zenith. Deneb, the luminary of Cygnus the Swan, marks the Summer Triangle’s third corner. Although it is this asterism’s dimmest star, it’s the brightest point of light in the entire northeastern sky.
Saturn (magnitude +0.1, in Sagittarius) is just past its July 9th opposition. It’s the steady, pale yellowish “star” in the southeast after dark, about 30° east (left) of Jupiter. To Saturn’s lower right is the Sagittarius Teapot. Saturn is highest for telescopic observing in the middle of the night — but still not very high for us northerners, because it’s far south this year: around declination –22°. Saturn’s rings are tilted a wide 23° to our line of sight, not quite as open as they’ve been for the last couple of years.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky map for July – https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-july-2019 
Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Capricorn enters Aquarius at 2:19am.
Ceres Directs at 12:06pm
Mercury (7/31), Jupiter (8/11), Saturn (9/18), Pluto (10/3) and Neptune (11/27), Chiron (12/12) Retrograde

Color: Topaz

Harvest 7/17-19

©2019 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

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Tides for Alsea Bay

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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
W   17     High  12:54 AM     7.8   5:48 AM     Set  6:26 AM      99
~    17      Low   7:57 AM    -1.2   8:57 PM    Rise  9:48 PM
~    17     High   2:32 PM     6.3
~    17      Low   7:50 PM     2.6

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Some people have learned to earn well, but they haven’t learned to live well.

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Journal Prompt – Wiki – What happens in the latest movie you saw?

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Quotes

~   Lost, yesterday, somewhere between sunrise and sunset, two golden hours, each set with sixty diamond minutes. No reward is offered, for they are gone forever. – Horace Mann (1796-1859)
~   Do what you love, love what you do, and deliver more than you promise.  – Harvey McKay
~   There is no passion to be found playing small — in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living. – Nelson Mandela
~   Nothing is more endangered in the modern world than the powerful combination of hard work toward meaningful goals joined with an exuberant embrace of the present moment. – Tom Morris

O Thou who passest thro’ our vallies in
Thy strength, curb thy fierce steeds, allay the heat
That flames from their large nostrils! thou, O Summer,
Oft pitched’st here thy golden tent, and oft
Beneath our oaks hast slept, while we beheld
With joy, thy ruddy limbs and flourishing hair. – William Blake (1757–1827)

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Lughnasadh Magick – Lore

Lammas, or Teltane

Lammas, or Teltane is a cross-quarter day midway between summer solstice and fall equinox. Although the days are still long, the sun rises later and sets earlier. The rhythm of the earth is shifting and energies are beginning to draw inward. To ensure the balance between sun and earth energies necessary for a successful harvest, the ancient Celts celebrated a ritual marriage between earth and sun, male and female, each Teltane. Likewise, August is a time for us to bring about balance between our male and female aspects so that we can harvest the fruitfulness of our souls.

Prayer/Practice

Great Spirit, I give thanks for the celestial harmony which turns the cosmic wheel this cross-quarter day. My energy, like Mother Earth’s, is beginning to draw inward. Yet I am aware that it is still a season of outgoing activity. May I find balance by aligning with the energies of earth and sky, sun and moon, male and female, through whose dance all creation comes into being.

Take a few letting-go breaths and mindfully feel your way into the place of inner stillness. Sense the energy of Mother Earth. Sense the energy of Father Sun. Weave them together in the meditation of bridging earth and heaven, simultaneously inhaling both energies into your heart, then exhaling their union back out into creation.

GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives 2002

LUGHNASADH  – http://www.chalicecentre.net/lughnasadh.htm

The Celtic harvest festival on August 1st takes its name from the Irish god Lugh, one of the chief gods of the Tuatha De Danann, giving us Lughnasadh in Ireland, Lunasdál in Scotland, and Laa Luanys in the Isle of Man. (In Wales, this time is known simply as Gwl Awst, the August Feast.)
Lugh dedicated this festival to his foster-mother, Tailtiu, the last queen of the Fir Bolg, who died from exhaustion after clearing a great forest so that the land could be cultivated. When the men of Ireland gathered at her death-bed, she told them to hold funeral games in her honor. As long as they were held, she prophesied Ireland would not be without song. Tailtiu’s name is from Old Celtic Talantiu, “The Great One of the Earth,” suggesting she may originally have been a personification of the land itself, like so many Irish goddesses. In fact, Lughnasadh has an older name, Brón Trogain, which refers to the painful labor of childbirth. For at this time of year, the earth gives birth to her first fruits so that her children might live.
Tailtiu gives her name to Teltown in County Meath, where the festival was traditionally held in early Ireland. It evolved into a great tribal assembly, attended by the High King, where legal agreements were made, political problems discussed, and huge sporting contests were held on the scale of an early Olympic Games. Artists and entertainers displayed their talents, traders came from far and wide to sell food, farm animals, fine crafts and clothing, and there was much storytelling, music, and high-spirited revelry, according to a medieval eye-witness account:

“Trumpets, harps, hollow-throated horns, pipers, timpanists, unwearied…fiddlers, gleemen, bone-players and bag-pipers, a rude crowd, noisy, profane, roaring and shouting.”

This was also an occasion for handfasting, or trial marriages. Young men and women lined up on either side of a wooden gate in a high wall, in which a hole was carved, large enough for a hand. One by one, girl and boy would grasp a hand in the hole, without being able to see who was on the other side. They were now married, and could live together for year and day to see if it worked out. If not, the couple returned to next year’s gathering and officially separated by standing back to back and walking away from each other.

Throughout the centuries, the grandeur of Teltown dwindled away, but all over Ireland, right up to the middle of this century, country-people have celebrated the harvest at revels, wakes, and fairs – and some still continue today in the liveliest manner. It was usually celebrated on the nearest Sunday to August 1st, so that a whole day could be set aside from work. In later times, the festival of Lughnasadh was christianized as Lammas, from the Anglo-Saxon, hlaf-mas, “Loaf-Mass,” but in rural areas, it was often remembered as “Bilberry Sunday,” for this was the day to climb the nearest “Lughnasadh Hill” and gather the earth’s freely-given gifts of the little black berries, which they might wear as special garlands or gather in baskets to take home for jam.

As of old, people sang and danced jigs and reels to the music of melodeons, fiddles and flutes, and held uproarious sporting contests and races. In some places, a woman—or an effigy of one—was crowned with summer flowers and seated on a throne, with garlands strewn at her feet. Dancers whirled around her, touching her garlands or pulling off a ribbon for good luck. In this way, perhaps, the ancient goddess of the harvest was still remembered with honor.

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Silliness – Helmets and Guards

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