Daily Stuff 7-18-19 Lu Pan

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. Minus Tide at 8:33 AM of -1.1 feet.

I was expecting rain, yesterday, but not during the afternoon! We actually got a tenth of an inch. This morning the sky is blue and mostly clear and the sun is very bright! 64F, wind at 6mph, AQI8, UV8. Tomrrow could get windy, but other than the night-time mists, there’s nothing but sun in the forecast for 10 days out.

Yesterday both started and ended late. We got some of the chores done before esbat, after Tempus made blueberry pancakes.

*

*

*

*

*

Esbat was fun and we got some business things taken care of. I have Pan-Pagan stuff to work on today, now that we’ve talked some of that over.

After esbat, I did some more cleaning, then sorted laundry and put stuff away. At that point, I had the embroidery pieces that had needed to be washed, so I curled up with those and did just that for the rest of the evening.

Tempus was sorting papers, and a number of boxes landed in the car this morning, heading for storage. He’s got a list of things to try to find and a stack to put with other pieces of the same sort.

I have the Pan-Pagan stuff to work on and some other writing, and he’s got the doors open!

Paper route tonight.

A Ken Gagne photo from up the Yachats River on 7/17/15.

220px-LuopanToday’s Feast is in honor of what may be a god named Lu Pan, but is usually referred to as a Feng Shui Wheel, or luopan. I don’t know how these really intersect, but Lu Pan is referred to in modern pagan literature as a Chinese god of carpenters and construction workers and the luopan is an instrument that determines how a house should be built. What is the connection? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lu_pan

flax flwrB 062813Today’s plant is New Zealand FlaxPhormium Tenax. This is a very different plant from common flax or linseed, Linum usitatissimum. It is used mostly as an ornamental in the northern hemisphere, but at one time sustained a lively trade as a fiber. We have a basket that was made of the leaves. While the two plants are very different, they have similar magickal properties. These days the fiber is mostly used by paper artisans. – Masculine, Mercury, Fire, Hulda – Money spells, add to coins and carry, flax in the shoe averts poverty. For protection while asleep, add to mustard seed, put both opposite cold water. Protection from evil entering, scatter with red pepper by door. Health and healing rituals, sprinkle altar with flaxseed. More here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phormium For the traditional uses of the plant fiberhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_flax

The shop opens at 11am. Summer  hours are 11am-7pm Thursday through Monday. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

******

Today’s Astro & Calendar

Full Moon – The day of, the day before, and day after the true Full Moon. “And better it be when the moon is full!”! Prime time for rituals for prophecy, for spells to come to fruition, infusing health and wholeness, etc. A good time for invoking deity. FRUITION Manifesting goals, nurturing, passion, healing, strength, power. Workings on this day are for protection, divination. “extra power”, job hunting, healing serious conditions Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. God/dess Aspect: Mother/Abundance/Kingship – – Associated God/desses: Danu, Cerridwen, Gaia, Aphrodite, Isis, Jupiter, Amon-Ra. Phase ends on 7/18 at 2:38am. Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 7/31 at 8:12pm. Waning Gibbous Moon – Best time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. – Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 7/24 at 6:18pm.

Week by week, bright Arcturus >>> is losing some of its height in the west after dark.
Look for <<< Spica to the lower left of Arcturus by about three fists at arm’s length. Lower right of Arcturus by the same amount is Denebola >>>, the tailtip of Leo. These three stars form an almost perfect equilateral triangle.
The Sun’s outermost major planet, Neptune, now rises around 11 p.m. local daylight time. But the best time to look for this ice giant world comes when it climbs nearly halfway to the zenith as morning twilight commences. The magnitude 7.8 planet lies in Aquarius, 1.1° east-northeast of 4th-magnitude Phi (φ) Aquarii. You can confirm your sighting of Neptune through a telescope, which reveals the planet’s 2.3″-diameter disk and blue-gray color.
Uranus (magnitude 5.8, in Aries) is high in the east before the first beginnings of dawn.

Old Farmer’s Almanac Sky map for July – https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-july-2019 
Goddess Month of Kerea runs from 7/11 – 8/8
Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4
Runic half-month of Uruz/ Ur, 7/14-28 According to Pennick Ur represents primal strength, a time of collective action. A good time for beginnings! Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992

Sun in Cancer
Moon in Aquarius
Mercury (7/31), Jupiter (8/11), Saturn (9/18), Pluto (10/3) and Neptune (11/27), Chiron (12/12) Retrograde

Color: Purple

Harvest 7/17-19

©2019 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

******

Celtic Tree Month of Tinne/Holly, Jul 8 – Aug 4, Tinne (CHIN-yuh), holly – The holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (35 feet) in open woodlands and along clearings in forests. Hollies are evergreen, and stand out in winter among the bare branches of the deciduous forest trees that surround them. Hollies form red berries before Samhain which last until the birds finish eating them, often after Imbolc. The typical “holly leaf” is found on smaller plants, but toward the tops of taller plants the leaves have fewer spiny teeth. Hollies are members of the Holly family (Aquifoliaceae). The common holly is often cultivated in North America, as are hybrids between it and Asiatic holly species.

Graves (1966) and others are of the opinion that the original tinne was not the holly, but rather the holm oak, or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). This is an evergreen oak of southern Europe that grows as a shrub, or as a tree to 25 m (80 feet). Like the holly, the holm oak has spiny-edged leaves on young growth. It does not have red berries, but it does have red leaf “galls” caused by the kermes scale insect; these are the source of natural scarlet dye. Holm oaks are occasionally cultivated in North America.

Tinne – Holly Ogam letter correspondences
Month: June
Color: Dark Grey
Class: Peasant
Letter: T
Meaning: Energy and guidance for problems to come

to study this month – Ioho – Yew Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Dark Green
Class: Chieftain
Letter: I, J, Y
Meaning: Complete change in life-direction or attitude.

******

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Th  18     High   1:32 AM     7.6   5:49 AM     Set  7:25 AM      99
~    18      Low   8:33 AM    -1.1   8:56 PM    Rise 10:22 PM
~    18     High   3:07 PM     6.3
~    18      Low   8:30 PM     2.5

******

Affirmation/Thought for the Day – The Secret of Life Is Not To Live…..But To Have Something to lived For……….

******

Journal Prompt – Auto-Biographical narrative – Tell about the strangest food you have ever eaten.

******

Quotes

~   Work with what arises in the moment, in the best way you can; if you are willing to preserve by rolling with the current, rather than resisting it, you will not only survive but you will succeed. By taking responsibility of the choices you make, the apparently unsurmountable can be conquered. – Tao Oracle
~   Bare is his back who has no brother. – Grettir’s Saga, c.82
~   Love is the vital essence that pervades and permeates, from the center to the circumference, the graduating circles of all thought and action. Love is the talisman of human weal and woe – the open sesame to every soul. – Elizabeth Stanton (1815-1902) US reformer
~   Quality is not an act. It is a habit. – Aristotle

Queen Anne, Queen Anne, has washed her lace
(She chose a summer’s day),
And hung it in a grassy place
To whiten, if it may.

Queen Anne, Queen Anne, has left it there,
And slept the dewy night;
Then waked, to find the sunshine fair,
And all the meadows white.

Queen Anne, Queen Anne, is dead and gone
(She died a summer’s day),
But left her lace to whiten on
Each weed-entangled way! – “Queen Anne’s Lace,” by Mary Leslie Newton; in “Silver Pennies,” Blanche Jennings Thompson, ed.; The Macmillan Company. 1925.

******

Lughnasadh Magick – Crafts

Cornhusk Chain – A simple cornhusk chain is a fun decoration for children to make, and looks great on an altar, your wall, or over a doorway. Patti Wigington

If you’re having a cookout and planning on eating corn on the cob, this is a great craft for using all those leftover corn husks. The fresh ones work best, but dried ones can be used if you soak them in water for ten or fifteen minutes and then pat them dry with paper towels.

Separate the husks lengthwise into strips about one inch wide. They should tear easily on their own. Form the first strip into a circle and staple it closed.

Take the second strip, loop it through the first, and staple (this is just like those paper chains you made in school when you were a child). Repeat until all the strips of husk have been added to the chain.

Once you’ve completed your chain, there are a number of things you can do with it.

As it dries, the husks will shrink and fade from green to tan, but it will still make a great Lammas decoration!

Corn Husk Herbal Sachet

During the late summer, particularly around the Lammas season, corn is in abundance. It’s everywhere, and if you’ve ever picked fresh corn straight from the fields, you know how delicious it tastes! When you pick your own corn – or even if you buy it from your local farmer’s market – you typically have to figure out what to do with all those leftover husks. You can use them to make a corn dolly or a husk chain if you like. Another great way to use them is by making corn husk herb sachets.

You’ll Need

  • Several corn husks
  • Dried herbs of your choice
  • A hot glue gun

Not sure which herbs to use? Check out our list of Herbal Correspondences.

Weave the Husks

Trim the ends off the husks, and cut them into strips – I find that about 1/2” – 3/4” in width is the most manageable size. Weave several strips together as shown in the photo (I used five going in each direction, for a total of ten). Once you’ve created a square, use your hot glue gun to anchor the stray edges into place, so you have a nice even edge.

Add Your Herbs

Fold the square in half and glue the short sides together, creating a small pocket. Fill the pouch with herbs of your choice, and then hot glue the long open edge closed.

To give your sachet some magical mojo, select herbs based upon purpose and intent:

  • Healing: Apple blossomlavender, fennel, chamomile, sandalwood, wintergreen, peppermint
  • Money/prosperity: Bay leaf, basil, chamomile, Buckeye, myrtle, apple, sunflower, pennyroyal
  • Love: Allspice, apple blossom, catnip, lavender, clove, yarrow, marjoram, basil.
  • Strength: Oak, acorns, bay leaf, thistle, yarrow.

Once your glue has dried you can place these sachets around your house or in your drawers. The corn husks will dry naturally, and you’ll be left with scented woven packets. If you like, decorate them with a pretty ribbon, some berries, or other seasonal items.

CORNHUSK DOLLS

-Corn husks, fresh or dried, about 6-8 pieces.
-String
-Cotton balls, about 4
-Scraps of cloth, yarn, beads
-pipe cleaners (optional)
Note: If you are using dried husks, soak them in water to soften them. Fresh husks need no special preparation

Step 1: Take a strip of husk and place a few cotton balls in the middle, twisting and tying it with string to make a head.

Step 2: Make some arms by folding another husk and tying it near each end to make hands. Slip the arms between the husks that extend under the head. Tie the waist with string.Arrange enough husks around the figure’s waist so that they overlap slightly. Tie them in place with string.

Step 3: Fold the husks down carefully. For a woman wearing a long skirt, cut the husks straight across at the hem. to make a man, divide the skirt in two and tie each half at the ankles. Let the figure dry completely

Step 4: You can leave you figure as is, or give it a face, hair, or even some fancier clothes. Use a fine-tipped marker to draw facial features. Glue some fuzzy yarn on for hair. Add some tiny beads for buttons, and bits of fabric for aprons or vests. A pipe cleaner staff or cane will help the man stand upright.

******

Silliness –

Confucius Says – Man who drive like hell bound to get there…

This entry was posted in Daily Stuff, Newsletter, Pagan, Wiccan and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.