Daily Stuff 4-15-20 Father Damien

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. The shop is closed for the duration.

The road is glistening in the street light. It’s lots warmer than the last few nights have been, with all the clouds overhead. 48F, wind at 0-1mph, AQI38, UV3. 20% chance of rain today and 10% tonight. It should be dry again into the weekend, but after that things likely to be showery and damp-ish.

Yesterday we didn’t really get anything going until 4:30 or so. We had someone stop by to grab the ping-pong set. The plants got dropped off at some point. I spent a couple of hours watching a block-printing class. It was on Facebook live and drove me mad with dropping either the vid or the sound. Thankfully, she recorded and will have it up on her Youtube channel, soon. I tried to get in on a movie night and couldn’t make the programs work. <sigh>

Tempus had gotten outside to water the plants, then came in and we got some supper. Yeah, started the day with supper! It was too cold out for me to do much, but I did see that my angelica is getting huge! …and the starts from Thyme Garden got dropped off. I spent quite awhile downloading, (and occasionally printing) some needlework patterns.

Tempus headed for Newport around 8. After that I got into a chat, talking about a medieval recipe that a bunch of us are experimenting with. I chatted with Sash for a bit once that was over. He was just home from work. Amor called almost as soon as I was offline and we talked for a couple of hours and then I talked to Tempus for a bit. By then he was curled up in a blanket, getting ready to snooze for awhile before starting the other

Clematis flower from 4/26/16

route. He said that the rain hadn’t been too bad, not slowing him down any.

Today I want to make some more pie dough. I’m whittling the box down. I’m going to be working up front by the books today, trying to finish getting some more of the stuff sorted around. There are still pillows in that section that we want to move to the area where the sofa is now, one of my sewing boxes and some grumple. I’m hoping to shift some of the backstock of used books to those shelves.

Rainbow over Yachats Bay, Ken Gagne photo from 4/14/15.

Darlingtonia_californica_ne1Today’s plant is the cobra lilyDarlingtonia Californica, a carnivorous bog plant, native to California and Oregon. These plants are trippy…. they eat bugs, because they thrive in such awful soil that they need a different way to get the nutrients that most plants get out of the ground! No, they don’t have any magickal uses that I know of. A good article about Darlingtonia: http://coastexplorermagazine.com/features/carnivorous-rare-and-wild-cobra-lilies The wiki article is here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darlingtonia_(plant) and one about the wayside in Florence is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darlingtonia_Botanical_Wayside The wayside is worth a drive. There are good walkways just above the ground level so that you don’t hurt the plants. We used to roll Grandma’s wheelchair through there every summer at least once, because she was fascinated, too.

feast 0415 FatherDamien.jpegToday’s feast is in honor of Father Damien, the priest of the lepers of Molokai. He was a Catholic missionary who took on the task of organizing the leper colony to which many people had been exiled for showing symptoms of what was then thought to be a highly contagious, incurable disease. He turned the place from a charnel pit to a place where people could live and grow and if they had actually contracted the disease, die in peace with good care. At the age of 49, Father Damien died of the disease himself and was canonized by the Catholic Church. More on Father Damien here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Father_Damien and on leprosy here, which is *not* highly contagious, only 5% of the population can catch it at all, and we now can cure it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leprosy and also a bit on the leper colony where he worked: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalawao

The shop is closed for the duration. Need something? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org We should be able to accommodate requests and even allow a little shopping, one person at a time.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 4/22 at 7:26pm. Waning Crescent Moon – Best time for beginning introspective magicks that are more long term (full year cycle) A good time for beginning knot magicks to “bind up” addictions and illness (finish just before the Tide Change of Dark to New) and “tying up loose ends” God/dess aspects – Demeter weeping for her Daughter, Mabon, Arachne, Tyr. Phase ends on 4/18 at 7:26am. 

Ganymede’s shadow hits the spot – The shadows of the Galilean moons regularly cross Jupiter’s disk. In this image, the Hubble Space Telescope captured Ganymede’s shadow silhouetted against the Great Red Spot. – NASA/ESA/A. Simon (GSFC)

Break out your telescope this morning to watch Ganymede’s shadow traverse Jupiter’s northern cloud tops. You’ll find the event already underway as the giant planet rises; the shadow drops off the planet’s northwestern limb to end the show at 5:52 A.M. EDT. Ganymede itself sits to Jupiter’s east and draws closer to the planet as the hours progress.
Nearby, the waning Moon passes 2° south of Saturn at 5 A.M. EDT.

By April 17th, the Pleiades have sunk 11° away from Venus. Soon they’ll be down out of sight.

This evening Venus forms a perfect isosceles triangle (two sides equal) with Aldebaran to its lower left and the Pleiades to its lower right.
Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn (magnitudes, +0.6, – 2.2, and +0.6, respectively) are lined up in the southeast before and during early dawn, as shown below. Each morning Mars moves a little farther away from the other two.

Old Farmer’s Almanac April Sky Map! – https://www.almanac.com/night-sky-map-april-minor-constellations
Goddess Month of Columbina runs from 3/20 – 4/17
Goddess Month of Maia runs from 4/18 – 5/15
Celtic Tree Month of Saille  Willow  Apr 15May 12
Runic half-month of Mannaz/ Man, April 14-28 A time when the archetypal reality of the human condition should be meditated upon. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Sun in Aries
Moon in Capricorn enters Aquarius at 12:37am.
Color: Yellow

Harvest 4/15-17

©2020 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Fearn/Alder, Mar 18 – Apr 14. Fern (FAIR-n) Alder – The common alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertner) is common along lowland rivers, where it grows with aspens, poplars, and willows. Like willows, alders sprout from stumps. This allows them to regenerate after heavy flooding. In protect sites they may grow to 20 m (65 feet) tall. Their leaves are more blunt-tipped than most North American alders, which look more like the grey alder (A. incana (L.) Moench). This species is more common in the mountains of Europe, and is not restricted to moist soils. Like ashes, European alders are not widely cultivated in North American (they are often sold as black alders), but several native species are. Alder wood is said to resist rotting when it is wet, and was the wood of choice for pilings in many regions. Alders are members of the Birch family (Betulaceae).

Fearn – Alder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: January
Color: Crimson
Class: Cheiftain
Letter: F, V
Meaning: Help in making choices; spiritual guidance and protection.

Ogam letter correspondences to study this month – Ailim – Silver Fir
Month: None
Color: Light Blue
Class: Shrub
Letter: A
Meaning: Learning from past mistakes; Take care in choices.

Ogam letter correspondences to study this month – Ailim – Silver Fir
Month: None
Color: Light Blue
Class: Shrub
Letter: A
Meaning: Learning from past mistakes; Take care in choices.

Celtic Tree Month of Saille/Willow, Apr 15 – May 12 The Willow in the Tree alphabet stands for the female and lunar rhythms of life. She is water-seeking, thriving from preference on the damp margins of lakes and streams or across the low-lying water meadows. Water and the tidal movements of the sea are governed by the pull of the moon. The moon in its monthly rhythms is female, contrasting with the male sun’s daily and yearly turnings. In several ways, the Celts held women in higher regard than we do today. On the material level, women were property owners, and whoever controlled the property controlled the marriage. Women of all types and ages appeared in the Celtic pantheon, the spiritual strength and life-giving qualities given by both female and male recognized equally. There were colleges of Druidesses – learned women and teachers – respected equally for their gifts of see-ship, often expressed through dreams, or night visions.
Magical Associations: Romantic love, healing, protection, fertility, magic for women.

Saille – Willow Ogam letter correspondences
Month: February
Color: listed only as bright
Class: Peasant
Letter: S
Meaning: Gaining balance in your life

to study this month – Ohn – Furze Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Yellow Gold
Class: Chieftain
Letter: O
Meaning: Information that could change your life

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Tides for Alsea Bay
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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
W   15      Low   1:12 AM     3.6   6:31 AM    Rise  3:32 AM      51
~    15     High   6:52 AM     6.6   8:02 PM     Set 12:44 PM
~    15      Low   2:09 PM     0.6
~    15     High   9:06 PM     6.0

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – The greatest effort is not concerned with results.

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Journal Prompt – What is? – What is the most important aspect of your life and why?

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Quotes

~   A person should tend to the oak if they want to live under it. – Egil’s Saga, c.71
~   Birds of a feather flock most together. – Njal’s Saga, c.51
~   For fast acting relief, try slowing down.- Lily Tomlin
~   A cynic is a man who knows the price of everything but the value of nothing. – Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Irish writer and wit

A flower is looking through the ground,
Blinking at the April weather;
Now a child has seen the flower:
Now they go and play together. – –Harold Monro (1879–1932)

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Beltane Magick – A Meditation on Beltane – Highway to Hel

Beltane is about deciding what kind of person we would like to be when the harvest is done.

By Galina Krasskova, April 26, 2011

http://www.patheos.com/Resources/Additional-Resources/Meditation-on-Beltane-Galina-Krasskova-04-27-2011.html
It seems odd to me to be sitting at my computer on a dismal, rainy, dreary April day, with the chill in the air serving as a palpable reminder that spring isn’t quite here yet, and writing about Beltane. Beltane is supposed to be about celebration, passion, fertility, prosperity, magic, heat, and yes, sex. Yep. Beltane is about sex (at least in part) and on days like today, that type of joyous celebration seems very far away. Still, if you’ll pardon the inevitable pun, Beltane is coming and like any of our other holy tides, it deserves a bit of thought.

I’ve been dreading writing this particular column for the past week or so, ever since I realized that Beltane and Walpurgis were right around the corner. This is the tail end of the school year for me (I’m in graduate school again) and papers are due, exams must be prepared for, then of course there are all the professional writing deadlines that are piling up. Thinking about what I’ve always considered a rather ‘happy-go-lucky’ holiday was not on my personal agenda of things I wanted to be doing (or had the time to do).

Still, even for me, misanthropic and overworked though I sometimes may be, it’s difficult not to get pulled into the energetic momentum of this time. With Beltane after all, we lay to rest, once and for all, the inertia of the preceding winter. What began with the land’s seemingly lazy resistance to the inevitable pull of spring bursts full force into bloom with the turning of the seasonal wheel to May.

Highway to Hel

A Meditation on BeltaneQueen of the Sacred Way: An Interview with Melitta BenuVirtual Veneration: Online ShrinesHonoring the Dead: An Interview with Laura PatsourisPhotographing Fortuna: Interview with Mary Ann GlassAuthor Bio »

At its core, Beltane is about planting. At Ostara we honored the readiness of the land to receive the seed; at Beltane we actually plant those seeds, be they literal or metaphorical. At Ostara we celebrated the potential fertility of the land, at Beltane we revel in its actuality.

This is kind of where the sex part of things comes in. Beltane is about life, growth, and all the messiness of unrestrained passion. It’s about the joining of seed to soil, body to body, physicality to physicality, and the potential joining of sperm to egg. It’s about bringing forth new life, new possibilities, new reasons to celebrate one’s traditions.

This is a time when the land, at least for us Northern Tradition folks, was traditionally blessed by happy couples having sex in fields, on the soil where their fluids and carnal enjoyment of each other only served to feed the land itself and further ensure its blossom. The May pole, a symbol we all know and love, is (as any fan of the original Wicker Man knows) “a phallic symbol.” The magic of Beltane is held forth in the erect penis and spurting seed, and in our bodies’ ability to experience pleasure. This, more than any other holy tide reminds us that living is cause for celebration. There is pleasure in being alive, pleasure that, at the appropriate times, can and should be indulged.

Far more than being about the celebrating the penis (or the vulva, or any other body part—not that there’s anything wrong with that; celebrate away, folks), I would interpret the wisdom and ‘medicine’ of this holiday on a broader level. I believe Beltane reminds us that our bodies are sacred. In the Northern Tradition the physical container of the soul is so valued that it’s actually considered part of the soul matrix.

That’s right: each physical vessel of incarnation is intimately connected to one’s soul, an integral part of it. We’re incarnate for a reason. Our bodies are the tools and conduits by and through which we experience everything, including the Divine. Moreover, they may even be the way the Gods experience us, spirituality being, like so many things, a two-way street. Far from needing to escape from the flesh, Beltane reminds us that there’s an awful lot of wisdom inherent in being in the flesh too.

One of the Goddesses commonly honored within the Northern Tradition at this time is the Goddess Freya. She is a tremendously powerful Goddess, associated with sexuality, eroticism, passion, battle and war, fierce fighting, cunning strategy, prosperity and wealth, physical beauty, and witchcraft and sorcery. One of Her primary and most important lessons is about knowing one’s own worth (and being unwilling to compromise that in any way).

That can be a hard, hard lesson for many people today (especially, I hate to say it, for women). Freya’s lessons often involve self-satisfaction and confidence in one’s physical being (and I’m not talking just about sexuality here). This is a Goddess who knows how to celebrate the flesh, both its passion and its power. Here is a Goddess not afraid to take up space, claim Her territory, defend Her territory, and own Her strength. Here is a Goddess who can teach Her devotees to say “where I stand is holy ground” and mean it.

Beltane’s call is a call to that type of commitment and courage. It reminds us that our physicality is sacred, no matter what messages we may imbibe from our families, our culture, or the media. We’re called to stand up and live our truth. Learning to express ourselves well physically and kinetically, learning to have both trust and confidence in our bodies is part of honoring this tremendous gift that we’ve been given. It’s part of living our truth.

Tending to our bodies, just as we tend to the land is good and sacred work. Our bodies support and nourish us just as the land supports and nourishes us. One might see in the microcosm of one, the macrocosm of the other. Sometimes that is the way these things work. So learning to nourish, care for, protect, and defend one’s physical form and knowing to the marrow of one’s being that this might even be a sacred obligation, is all part of what Beltane can teach us. Imagine how our lives would be different if treating our bodies kindly, loving our flesh, and living healthily was something we could all do with joy. How many of us can look in the mirror and say “I love my physical form” and mean it? How many of us can stand naked in front of the mirror and say those words and really mean them? Freya can teach us how, if we honor Her rightly and well. Beltane’s wisdom can show us the way.

Our world is out of balance. I’ve talked about this before many times in many different articles and columns. I think that it is inevitable that our collective psyches bear the brunt of that sickness. We have come to embody it physically. Our bodies and the way we relate to them have suffered generations of fear, shame, and abuse because we have forgotten that simple truth that flesh is sacred.

We have forgotten so much in abandoning our ancestral ways and our Holy Powers but most of all, we’ve forgotten how to interact with ourselves in a healthy manner. We’ve forgotten how to love being. Beltane calls us to throw ourselves into the inevitable change this time brings, the momentum, the urgency, the growing sense of joy and movement that fills the land. It urges us to seek our passions, to find that which nourishes us and to live it fully each and every day of our lives. Beltane’s wisdom is, above all else, a call to embodied joy.

Moreover, Beltane reminds us not just to honor our physical bodies, but to rejoice in the physical experience of the natural world. That world is a gift in all its beautiful, breathtaking, sometimes confusing diversity. This holy tide calls us to move beyond our dearly held paradigms into the reality of being: beyond our dichotomies (sexual, gender, and otherwise) into the rich tapestry of possibility inherent in creation.

Diversity is nature’s greatest achievement. As we celebrate the beauty, bounty, and blessings of corporeality, physicality, and incarnation, we’re reminded to celebrate it all, not just those forms that are comfortable. Nature is an explosion of diversity and this is a lesson we can take to heart as we honor our bodies: we’re part of that diversity too. As a good friend of mine once pointed out: there is no “normal.” Let’s do away with the idea of “normal.” There is only what is normal for us, for each individual, one by one. Beltane gives us a chance to celebrate that and given how much hate is in our world for any type of diversity of being, that too, is no small thing.

This is a holy tide all about action and restoration. We have the chance as we move into May to recommit to picking up those threads of connection—to our Gods, our ancestors, the land itself, and to ourselves—sundered so long ago. Healing that damage doesn’t happen with grand gestures; it happens with small commitments, like planting a seed. That’s Beltane’s wisdom. It’s about making those promises—to ourselves, our families, our communities—that we will see fulfilled with the coming harvest. It’s about deciding what we wish to harvest in the coming season for ourselves, our lives, and our spirituality. It’s about deciding what kind of person we would like to be when the harvest is done.

May Freya smile upon each of us this Beltane.

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Silliness – Sniglet – Any word which should be in the dictionary but isn’t. – bumperglints (BUMP ur glintz) – n. The small reflective obstacles in the middle of interstate highways which supposedly keep drivers awake and on the track.

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