Daily Stuff 10-21-20 St. Ursula

Hi, folks!

The shop is closed today. Fall hours are 1pm-6pm Thursday through Monday (although we’re often here, later). Last Minus Tide of the cycle at 11:26 PM of -0.5 feet.Featured photo by Ken Gagne.

Partly cloudy and chilly. We’re under at SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY for 6am through this evening, 47F, wind at 0-3mph, AQI16-33, UV3. 20% chance of rain today and 10% tonight. There’s still a pretty good chance of rain on Friday, but mostly in the afternoon. The rest of the forecast looks like just partly cloudy, but chilly (50’s), with it getting downright *cold* Sunday night, down to 35F.

Yesterday was just one thing after another. Tempus stayed in Newport waiting for the car place to open only to find another delay, so he came home, running back up in the afternoon…and another delay. We’ve used up more gasoline on the fact that they don’t answer their phone….

I finally gave in and got my shawl pulled out and started running the heater under my desk. Definitely October…

I got word first that the husband of a good friend had died, and then that a friend of my own had died, had a stroke over the weekend, right after she finished another quilt and posted about it, it looks like, and died yesterday morning. That kinda killed my day. I tried to work, but ended up sorting pictures because my brain just wouldn’t function.

I finally just went to bed with my embroidery. At least I could feel like I was accomplishing something. It didn’t help that my joints are reacting badly to the weather changes. In the evening I did a little cookery, mostly using up leftovers in a casserole, but getting a stuffing ready for stuffing baked squash over the next couple of weeks.

Today I’m hoping to get to the plants again, and then maybe start on some of the Mab’s Kits that have been waiting for months. So far, I haven’t had enough sales to completely deplete things, but there are a ton waiting to be made up and I want to try to finish up a Yule Kit.

With any luck we’ll have the new car today and can turn in the rental. We’re lucky that Tempus has such a good boss with the paper route that he’s been helping us out with it. If there’s time we’re hoping to go up to Tiny Tranquility to see whether there are spots open up there or will be over the winter.

A Ken Gagne photo of spindrift in Yachats from 10/5/15.

220px-Rhubarb_flower

Today’s Plant is RhubarbRheum rhabarbarum. Best known as “pie plant” or in strawberry and rhubarb jam this is a wonderful and nutritious stalk vegetable, that has been legally counted as a fruit, because of its uses. The roots have been used as a laxative for thousands of years, and the stalks, while strong-tasting when uncooked and with no sugar, are delicious in sauces, pies, jellies, juice and so on, but the leaves are poisonous. It is very easy to grow since the roots will over-winter, even if the stalks die back and it’s one of the earliest vegetables to be harvestable. – Feminine, Venus Earth. – Wear a dried piece to help with stomach or gut pain and general protection. The pie served to a mate helps to maintain fidelity and is an aphrodisiac, especially when combined with strawberries.

200px-StaUrsulaCepleanu

Today’s feast is that of St. Ursula who was martyred for refusing the advances of a Hun prince….supposedly. She may be a Christianized version of a bear/moon goddess from far earlier in history or even the goddess Freya. “Her legend, probably unhistorical, is that she was a princess who, at the request of her father King Dionotus of Dumnonia in south-west Britain, set sail to join her future husband, the pagan govrnor Conan Meriadoc of Armorica, along with 11,000 virginal handmaidens. After a miraculous storm brought them over the sea in a single day to a Gaulish port, Ursula declared that before her marriage she would undertake a pan-European pilgrimage. She headed for Rome with her followers and persuaded the pope, Cyriacus (unknown in the pontifical records), and Sulpicius, bishop of Ravenna, to join them. After setting out for Cologne, which was being besieged by Huns, all the virgins were beheaded in a massacre. The Huns’ leader shot Ursula dead, in about 383 (the date varies).” – Quoted from Wikipedia   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Ursula

The shop is closed today.. Fall hours are 1pm-6pm Thursday through Monday (although we’re often here, later). Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 10/31 at 7:49. New Moon – The beginning of a new cycle. Keywords for the New phase are: beginning, birth, emergence, projection, clarity. It is the time in a cycle that you are stimulated to take a new action. During this phase the new cycle is being seeded by your vision, inner and outer. Engage in physical activity. Spend time alone. VISUALIZE your goals for the 29.6-day cycle ahead. The new moon is for starting new ventures, new beginnings. Also love and romance, health or job hunting. God/dess aspect: Infancy, the Cosmic Egg, Eyes-Wide-Open – Associated God/dess: Inanna who was Ereshkigal. Phase ends at 12:31am on 10/18. Diana’s Bow – On the 3rd day after the new moon you can (weather permitting) see the tiny crescent in the sky, the New Moon holding the Old Moon in her arms. Begin on your goals for the next month. A good time for job interviews or starting a project. Take a concrete step! God/dess aspect: Daughter/Son/Innocence – Associated God/dess: Vesta, Horus. Phase ends on 10/21 at 12:31am.  

astro

Old Farmer’s Almanac October Sky Map – https://www.almanac.com/night-sky-october

Runic half-month of Wunjo/Wyn – October 13-28 – Wyn represents joy, the rune being the shape of a weather vane. The month represents the creation of harmony within the given conditions of the present.

Goddess Month of Hathor runs from 10/3 – 10/30
Celtic Tree Month of Gort/Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27


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Sun in Virgo

Mercury (11/3), Mars (11/13), Neptune (11/28), Chiron (12/12) Uranus (1/14/21) Retrograde

Moon in Scorpio enters Sagittarius at 9:43pm. 

Color – Yellow

©2020 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Gort/Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27 – Gort – (GORT), ivy – Ivy (Hedera helix L.) is also a vine, growing to 30 m (100 feet) long in beech woods and around human habitations, where it is widely planted as a ground cover. Ivy produces greenish flowers before Samhain on short, vertical shrubby branches. The leaves of these flowering branches lack the characteristic lobes of the leaves of the rest of the plant. Like holly, ivy is evergreen, its dark green leaves striking in the bare forests of midwinter. Ivy is widely cultivated in North America. It is a member of the Ginseng family (Araliaceae).

Gort – Ivy Ogam letter correspondences
Month: September
Color: Sky Blue
Class: Chieftain
Letter: G
Meaning: Take time to soul search or you will make a wrong decision.

to study this month Uilleand – Honeysuckle Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Yellow-white
Class: Peasant
Letter: P, PE, UI
Meaning: Proceed with caution.

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Tides for Alsea Bay
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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – 

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Journal Prompt – 

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Quotes

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Samhain Magick – 

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Silliness –Black

The shop opens at 1pm. Fall hours are 1pm-6pm Thursday through Monday (although we’re often here, later). Featured photo by Ken Gagne, , , ,  and more! Please find today’s newsletter at  !

Energy list – on WordPress, as well, at https://ancientlightshop.wordpress.com/energy-list/

Ancient Light’s Cafe Press store – http://www.cafepress.com/ancientlight

CoastalAnja’s Spoonflower Fabric Designs – We do Pagan, too! http://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/coastalanja…

Mab’s Creations blog at http://mabscreations.wordpress.com/ .

OCPPG2020 – October 9-11 of 2020!

Historical Re-enactment blog, House Capuchin – https://housecapuchin3.wordpress.com/

Love & Light,
Anja

Hi, folks!

The shop opens at 1pm. Fall hours are 1pm-6pm Thursday through Monday (although we’re often here, later). Featured photo by Ken Gagne.

Weather, F, wind at mph and gusting, AQI, UV. Forecast

Yesterday

Today

Wise

Today’s feast

Today’s Plant

The shop opens at 1pm. Fall hours are 1pm-6pm Thursday through Monday (although we’re often here, later). Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

******

Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 10/31 at 7:49. Waxing Crescent phase – Keywords for the Crescent phase are: expansion, growth, struggle, opportunity. It is the time in a cycle that you gather the wisdom learned in the new phase and communicate your intention to move forward. Light a candle. Write or read an affirmation. LISTEN & ABSORB. Commit to your goal. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, energy and enthusiasm – Associated God/dess: Artemis & Apollo, Mayet/Djehuti, Freya/Frey. Phase ends at the Quarter on 10/23 at 6:23am.

The waxing Moon will align with Jupiter and Saturn on Wednesday this coming week, then it will form a neat triangle with them on Thursday.
The shape of that triangle may differ a bit for you; these scenes are drawn exact for a viewer near the middle of North America (at latitude 40° N, longitude 90° W). Hour by hour, as the band of twilight crosses the continent from one time zone to the next, the Moon creeps noticeably eastward along its orbit against the background stars and planets.

The Moon, nearing first quarter, shines in a line with Saturn and Jupiter. It’s to their lower right, as shown at the top of this page.

Despite its name, the Summer Triangle remains on view in January’s early evening sky. The asterism’s brightest star, Vega, appears near the top of the image, while Deneb lies at lower left and Altair at lower right. In this scene, the triangle and the Milky Way stand above Yosemite Valley. Nevada Falls appears at the lower right of the picture with Vernal Falls below it. – Ruben Kier

It’s mid-October, so Deneb has replaced Vega as the zenith star after nightfall (for skywatchers at mid-northern latitudes). And so, necessarily, Capricornus has replaced Sagittarius as the zodiacal constellation due south.

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was on the planet’s central meridian (System II longitude 331°) when Christopher Go took this image on May 5th in near-perfect seeing. South is up. “There are exceptional details resolved inside the GRS.” he writes. “Aside from the dark core, note the bright white streak. The North Equatorial Belt is very chaotic. Two [tiny white upwelling-cloud] outbreaks can be seen in the NEB.”

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot should transit the planet’s central meridian around 8:31 p.m. EDT.

Orionid meteor shower – The best time to spot Orionid meteors is early in the morning, when the radiant is high in the sky. – Astronomy: Roen Kelly

The Orionid meteor shower peaks early this morning. At that time, the Moon nowhere in sight and the shower’s radiant, which sits in northern Orion, is high in the sky. Look for the familiar figure of the Hunter in the south and locate his right shoulder (on the left side of the constellation), marked by the bright red giant Betelgeuse. A little less than 3° northeast of Betelgeuse is magnitude 4 Mu (μ) Orionis; follow a line drawn between these two stars about 7° farther northeast from Mu, and you’ll run smack dab into the Orionids’ radiant. The shower’s predicted maximum rate is roughly 20 meteors per hour, and that rate grows more likely in the hours before dawn. Orionids are fast-paced meteors, skipping through the atmosphere at roughly 41 miles (67 kilometers) per second. And they have a famous parent: The Orionids are the result of dust and debris shed by Comet 1P/Halley as it flies near the Sun. Although the shower’s maximum occurs this morning, its activity will last into early November. Vigilant sky-watchers are likely to catch increased rates of meteors over the next few nights at least, and likely well into next month.

The waxing Moon will align with Jupiter and Saturn on Wednesday this coming week, then it will form a neat triangle with them on Thursday.
The shape of that triangle may differ a bit for you; these scenes are drawn exact for a viewer near the middle of North America (at latitude 40° N, longitude 90° W). Hour by hour, as the band of twilight crosses the continent from one time zone to the next, the Moon creeps noticeably eastward along its orbit against the background stars and planets.

Jupiter and Saturn (magnitudes –2.2 and +0.5, respectively) shine in the south-southwest in late dusk. Get your telescope on them early before they sink lower toward the southwest later in the evening. Jupiter is the bright one; Saturn is 6° to its upper left. Watch them creep toward each other for the rest of the fall. They’ll pass just 0.1° apart at conjunction on December 21st, low in twilight, as fall turns to winter. See Bob King’s Stormy Times on Jupiter. And you can follow the interplay of Jupiter with its moons and their shadows, and find all the transit times of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, using the Celestial Calendar section of the October Sky & Telescope.

Old Farmer’s Almanac October Sky Map – https://www.almanac.com/night-sky-october

Runic half-month of Wunjo/Wyn – October 13-28 – Wyn represents joy, the rune being the shape of a weather vane. The month represents the creation of harmony within the given conditions of the present.

Goddess Month of Hathor runs from 10/3 – 10/30
Celtic Tree Month of Gort/Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is sun-in-virgo.png
Sun in Virgo

Mercury (11/3), Mars (11/13), Neptune (11/28), Chiron (12/12) Uranus (1/14/21) Retrograde

Moon in Capricorn. 

Color – Topaz

©2020 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Gort/Ivy  Sep 30 – Oct 27 – Gort – (GORT), ivy – Ivy (Hedera helix L.) is also a vine, growing to 30 m (100 feet) long in beech woods and around human habitations, where it is widely planted as a ground cover. Ivy produces greenish flowers before Samhain on short, vertical shrubby branches. The leaves of these flowering branches lack the characteristic lobes of the leaves of the rest of the plant. Like holly, ivy is evergreen, its dark green leaves striking in the bare forests of midwinter. Ivy is widely cultivated in North America. It is a member of the Ginseng family (Araliaceae).

Gort – Ivy Ogam letter correspondences
Month: September
Color: Sky Blue
Class: Chieftain
Letter: G
Meaning: Take time to soul search or you will make a wrong decision.

to study this month Uilleand – Honeysuckle Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Yellow-white
Class: Peasant
Letter: P, PE, UI
Meaning: Proceed with caution.

******

Tides for Alsea Bay
*

Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
W   21     High   5:03 AM     6.7   7:40 AM    Rise  1:36 PM      21
~    21      Low  10:23 AM     3.0   6:21 PM     Set 10:20 PM
~    21      High   4:15 PM     8.2
~    21      Low  11:26 PM    -0.5

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Always have a plan, and believe in it. Nothing happens by accident.

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Journal Prompt – Favorites – What has been your favorite birthday present of all those you’ve received? Write the reasons for your answer.

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Quotes

~   Falsehoods have short legs. – Macedonian proverb
~   A taxpayer is someone who works for the federal government but who doesn’t have to take a  civil service exam. – Ronald Reagan
~   Give kind heed to the dead, sick-dead, Sea-dead, or word-dead; treat their bodies with respect and see that they are laid to rest with respect. – Volsunga Saga, c.21
~   I’m all ready you see. Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me! – Dr. Seuss

The Leaves are Falling Down
(to the tune of “The Farmer in the Dell”)

The leaves are falling down
The leaves are falling down
School is here and fall is near
The leaves are falling down.

The leaves are falling down
The leaves are falling down
Some are red and some are brown
The leaves are falling down.

The leaves are falling down
The leaves are falling down
They tickle your nose and touch your toes
The leaves are falling down. – June Haggard

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Samhain Magick – Lore – From:  http://www.celticspirit.org/samhain.htm
Samhain marks one of the two great doorways of the Celtic year, for the Celts divided the year into two seasons: the light and the dark, at Beltane on May 1st and Samhain on November 1st. Some believe that Samhain was the more important festival, marking the beginning of a whole new cycle, just as the Celtic day began at night. For it was understood that in dark silence comes whisperings of new beginnings, the stirring of the seed below the ground. Whereas Beltane welcomes in the summer with joyous celebrations at dawn, the most magically potent time of this festival is November Eve, the night of October 31st, known today of course, as Halloween.

Samhain (Scots Gaelic: Samhuinn) literally means “summer’s end.” In Scotland and Ireland, Halloween is known as Oíche Shamhna, while in Wales it is Nos Calan Gaeaf, the eve of the winter’s calend, or first.  With the rise of Christianity, Samhain was changed to Hallowmas, or All Saints’ Day, to commemorate the souls of the blessed dead who had been canonized that year, so the night before became popularly known as Halloween, All Hallows Eve, or Hollantide. November 2nd became All Souls Day, when prayers were to be offered to the souls of all who the departed and those who were waiting in Purgatory for entry into Heaven.  Throughout the centuries, pagan and Christian beliefs intertwine in a gallimaufry of celebrations from Oct 31st through November 5th, all of which appear both to challenge the ascendancy of the dark and to revel in its mystery.

In the country year, Samhain marked the first day of winter, when the herders led the cattle and sheep down from their summer hillside pastures to the shelter of stable and byre. The hay that would feed them during the winter must be stored in sturdy thatched ricks, tied down securely against storms. Those destined for the table were slaughtered, after being ritually devoted to the gods in pagan times. All the harvest must be gathered in — barley, oats, wheat, turnips, and apples — for come November, the faeries would blast every growing plant with their breath, blighting any nuts and berries remaining on the hedgerows. Peat and wood for winter fires were stacked high by the hearth. It was a joyous time of family reunion, when all members of the household worked together baking, salting meat, and making preserves for the winter feasts to come. The endless horizons of summer gave way to a warm, dim and often smoky room; the symphony of summer sounds was replaced by a counterpoint of voices, young and old, human and animal.

In early Ireland, people gathered at the ritual centers of the tribes, for Samhain was the principal calendar feast of the year.   The greatest assembly was the ‘Feast of Tara,’ focusing on the royal seat of the High King as the heart of the sacred land, the point of conception for the new year. In every household throughout the country, hearth-fires were extinguished. All waited for the Druids to light the new fire of the year — not at Tara, but at Tlachtga, a hill twelve miles to the north-west. It marked the burial-place of Tlachtga, daughter of the great druid Mogh Ruith, who may once have been a goddess in her own right in a former age.

At at all the turning points of the Celtic year, the gods drew near to Earth at Samhain, so many sacrifices and gifts were offered up in thanksgiving for the harvest. Personal prayers in the form of objects symbolizing the wishes of supplicants or ailments to be healed were cast into the fire,  and at the end of the ceremonies, brands were lit from the great fire of Tara to re-kindle all the home fires of the tribe, as at Beltane. As they received the flame that marked this time of beginnings, people surely felt a sense of the kindling of new dreams, projects and hopes for the year to come.

The Samhain fires continued to blaze down the centuries.  In the 1860s the Halloween bonfires were still so popular in Scotland that one traveler reported seeing thirty fires lighting up the hillsides all on one night, each surrounded by rings of dancing figures, a practice which continued up to the first World War. Young people and servants lit brands from the fire and ran around the fields and hedges of house and farm, while community leaders surrounded parish boundaries with a magic circle of light. Afterwards, ashes from the fires were sprinkled over the fields to protect them during the winter months — and of course, they also improved the soil. The bonfire provided an island of light within the oncoming tide of winter darkness, keeping away cold, discomfort, and evil spirits long before electricity illumined our nights. When the last flame sank down, it was time to run as fast as you could for home, raising the cry, “The black sow without a tail take the hindmost!”

Even today, bonfires light up the skies in many parts of the British Isles and Ireland at this season, although in many areas of Britain their significance has been co-opted by Guy Fawkes Day, which falls on November 5th, and commemorates an unsuccessful attempt to blow up the English Houses of Parliament in the 17th century. In one Devonshire village, the extraordinary sight of both men and women running through the streets with blazing tar barrels on their backs can still be seen!  Whatever the reason, there will probably always be a human need to make fires against the winter’s dark.

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Silliness – Scary Book

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