Daily Stuff 11-23-20 First recorded strike

Hi, folks!

The shop opens at 1pm. Winter hours are 1pm-5pm Thursday through Monday (although we’re often here, later). We will be closed for Thanksgiving on 11/26. Featured photo by Ken Gagne.

There’s more rain on the way, but for now it’s just cloudy. 43F, wind at 2-7mph and gusting, AQI 24, UV1. Chance of rain 60% today and 10% tonight. There’s still some rain offshore, but a lot more north of us than what we’re getting. There’s a huge system up in the Gulf of Alaska that we’ll see some of, later. Today’s rain should quit by 10am and then there’s a break until mid-afternoon on Tuesday and Wednesday will be wet. We’re supposed to see at least a little sun Thursday through Sunday and then Monday is back to showers.

Tempus got more of the Thanksgiving shopping done before we opened. We had about 4 people in that we’re sure of, plus someone who opened the door, took one look and fled. 🙂

Yesterday wasn’t much fun for me. I woke with not only the weakness and trembling that I get in the aftermath of a migraine, but a new headache! I managed to do my class on redacting medieval recipes and some stuff before and after, but by 4pm I was toast. I curled up in the nap bed and read for a bit, then slept until Tempus closed. Once we were home I went back to bed.

By early afternoon that rain was bucketing down and everything is still wet. I’ve been up since 11:30, doing photos (one of my chores for the day) and I’m going to try to do a little cooking so that Tempus has something warm in his stomach before he heads out on the paper run.

Today we should be open the usual hours, but we’re going to be closed on Thursday, and if the number of cases in Waldport goes up any farther (there was an outbreak from an event at the Moose) we may close over next weekend. We’ll see.

Yachats Bay mirror from 11/17/16 by Ken Gagne

mugwort Artemisia_vulgaris_-_Köhler–s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-016

Today’s Plant is Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris. One of the Nine Herbs of the old Anglo-Saxon charm, this herb has many different uses from insect-repelling to flavoring beer. It’s a bad one for pregnant women to ingest since it can induce abortion, since it’s a mild poison, but it’s used as a medicinal for various complaints and as a food. Some of the traditional folk uses are: magical protection, to repel insects, especially moths, from gardens.,
as a remedy against fatigue,  to protect travelers against evil spirits and wild animals. Feminine, Venus, Air/Earth – Magical uses: Clairvoyance, psychic dreams, astral projection, protection, strength. Place in the shoes for protection and to prevent fatigue on long journeys. The fresh leaves rubbed on a magick mirror or crystal ball will strengthen divinatory abilities. Mugwort is perhaps the most widely used Witches’ herb of all time. I love this drawing of it, because you can clearly see the differences between it and the other artemisias, like sagebrush or wormwood…. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_Herbs_Charm  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mugwort

220px-Khendjer_2

The first recorded strike took place among pyramid labourers, Egypt, November 23, 1170 BCE. They were striking over not having a living wage. Has anything changed? This probably was Khendjer’s pyramid in Saqquara, but I don’t have a lot more info. This pyramidon (the top stone on a pyramid) is from his pyramid.

They say the Pharaohs built the pyramids.
Do you think one Pharaoh dropped one bead of sweat?
We built the pyramids for the Pharaohs
and we’re building for them yet. – Anna Louise Strong

The shop opens at 1pm. Winter hours are 1pm-5pm Thursday through Monday (although we’re often here, later). We will be closed for Thanksgiving on 11/26. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 11/30 at 1:30am. Waxing Gibbous Moon – From seven to fourteen days after the new moon. For spells that need concentrated work over a ¼ moon cycle this is the best time for constructive workings. Aim to do the last working on the day of the Full moon, before the turn. Keywords for the Gibbous phase are: analyze, prepare, trust. It is the time in a cycle to process the results of the actions taken during the First Quarter. During this phase you are gathering information. Give up making judgments; it will only lead to worry. Your knowledge is incomplete. Laugh. Analyze and filter. LOOK WITHIN. God/dess aspect: Maiden/Youth, but in the uncommitted phase, the Warriors – Associated God/desses: Dion, Dionysius, Venus, Thor. Phase ends at the Full on 11/28 at 1:30pm.

Jupiter, Moon, and M44 rising – The moon rises alongside Jupiter and the Beehive Cluster in this 2014 shot. This week, the Moon shares the sky with several planets. – Jeff Sullivan (Flickr)

The Moon passes 5° south of Neptune at 7 A.M. EST, but both are below the horizon at the time. Instead, you can catch the pair after sunset, when they are just over 6° apart in the constellation Aquarius. Neptune, whose dim magnitude 8 glow will require binoculars or a small scope, presents a bluish disk just 2″ across. It currently sits less than 1° east of magnitude 4.2 Phi (φ) Aquarii. Neptune is now roughly 30 astronomical units from Earth, where 1 astronomical unit, or AU, is the average Earth-Sun distance. That means its light takes a little over four hours to reach us here on Earth. Neptune has been slowly sliding southwest against the background stars, but in just a few days it will reach its stationary point and about-face to begin tracking northeast.

Usually Algol matches the brightness of Gamma (γ) Andromedae to its west (to the right here; north is up). But at mid-eclipse Algol is about halfway in brightness between (ε) and faint Kappa (κ).

Two faint fuzzies naked-eye: The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) and the Perseus Double Cluster are two of the most famous deep-sky objects. They’re both cataloged as 4th magnitude, and in a fairly good sky you can see each with the unaided eye. Binoculars make them easier. They’re only 22° apart, very high toward the east early these evenings — to the right of Cassiopeia and closer below Cassiopeia, respectively. But they look rather different, the more so the darker your sky. See for yourself! You can find them with the all-sky constellation map in the center of the November or December Sky & Telescope.

As the months pass, outer planets like Jupiter and Saturn move westward with respect to your landscape down toward the sunset. But as the days pass, the Moon in its faster orbit around Earth steps eastward, away from the evening sunset. This despite the fact that the Moon orbits Earth in the same direction that the planets (including Earth) orbit the Sun!
So why do they go opposite ways in your sky? This is left as an exercise for your correct visualization of the solar system and our place in it! Answer at the end of this page.

Jupiter and Saturn (magnitudes –2.1 and +0.6, respectively) tilt ever farther down in the southwest during and after twilight. Look early. Jupiter is the bright one; Saturn is upper left of it. Watch their separation shrink from 3.3° to 2.3° this week, from November 20th to 27th. They’ll pass 0.1° apart at conjunction on December 21st. Don’t expect a decent view in a telescope; they’re farther and smaller than they were last summer, and the low-altitude seeing will be poor.

Old Farmer’s Almanac October Sky Map – https://www.almanac.com/night-sky-october

Runic half month of Naudhiz/ Nyd /Nauthiz – November 13- 27 – Need-fire – Time to prepare for winter. Consciousness is the Necessity. “That which does not destroy me makes me stronger.” – Nietzsche Runic half-month of Isa/ Is November 28-12 Literally, ‘ice’: a static period. The time of waiting before birth. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Moon in Pisces

Goddess Month of Cailleach/Samhain runs from 10/31 to 11/27
Goddess Month of Astrea runs from 11/28 – 12/25
Celtic Tree Month of Ngetal/Reed  Oct 28 – Nov 24 – nGéadal – (NYEH-dl)
Celtic Tree Month of Ruis/Elder  Nov 25 – Dec 22 – Ruis – (RWEESH),

Mars (11/13), Neptune (11/28), Chiron (12/12) Uranus (1/14/21) Retrograde

Color – Lavendar

Planting 11/22-23

©2020 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Ngetal/Reed  Oct 28 – Nov 24 – nGéadal – (NYEH-dl), reed – The term “reed” is used with great imprecision in North America, but t is clear that the reed of the ogham is the common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel). This is a giant grass, with stems as high as 4 m (13 feet). It grows in marshy areas, where it often forms dense stands. Like most other grasses, the vertical stems live only a single year, dying in the autumn and being replaced with new green shoots in the spring. The dead stems rattle and whisper in late autumn winds. Common reed has spread as a weed throughout the world; in North America it is widespread in cooler climates. Common reed is in the Grass family (Poaceae, or Gramineae). “The Reed Month, is said by some to be most favorable for communication with ancestral spirits and the strengthening of all family ties, with magickal associations with fertility, love, protection, and family concerns. ‘Thin and slender is the Reed. He stands in clumps at the edge of the river and between his feet hides the swift pike awaiting an unsuspecting minnow to come his way. In his thinness the reed resembles arrows that fly, silver-tipped, up into the unknown air to land at the very source that one had searched for all these years. Firing arrows off into the unknown is an expression of the desire to search out basic truths. If you loose off without direction, the place of landing will be random. If the firing off is carried out with the correct conviction, determination and sense of purpose, then the act becomes secondary to the event that comes both before and after the moment.'”   Source: Earth, Moon and Sky

Ngetal – Reed Ogam letter correspondences
Month: October
Color: Grass Green
Class: Shrub
Letter: NG
Meaning: Upsets or surprises

to study this month Mor – the Sea Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Blue-green
Class: none
Letter: AE, X, XI, M

Ruis/Elder  Nov 25 – Dec 22 – Ruis – (RWEESH), elder – Celtic tree month of Ruis (Elder) commences (Nov 25 – Dec 22) – Like other Iron Age Europeans, the Celts were a polytheistic people prior to their conversion to (Celtic) Christianity. The Celts divided the year into 13 lunar cycles (months or moons). These were linked to specific sacred trees which gave each moon its name. Today commences the Celtic tree month of Elder.


Elder or Elderberry (Sambucus) is a genus of fast-growing shrubs or small trees in the family Caprifoliaceae. They bear bunches of small white or cream coloured flowers in the Spring, that are followed by bunches of small red, bluish or black berries. The berries are a very valuable food resource for many birds. Common North American species include American Elder, Sambucus canadensis, in the east, and Blueberry Elder, Sambucus glauca, in the west; both have blue-black berries. The common European species is the Common or Black Elder, Sambucus nigra, with black berries.

The common elder (Sambucus nigra L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (33 feet) in damp clearings, along the edge of woods, and especially near habitations. Elders are grown for their blackish berries, which are used for preserves and wine. The leaf scars have the shape of a crescent moon. Elder branches have a broad spongy pith in their centers, much like the marrow of long bones, and an elder branch stripped of its bark is very bone-like. The red elder (S. racemosa L.) is a similar plant at higher elevations; it grows to 5 m (15 feet). Red elder extends its native range to northern North America, and it is cultivated along with other native species, but common elders are seldom seen in cultivation. Elders are in the Honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae).

Ruis – Elder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: Makeup days of the thirteenth Moon
Color: Red
Class: Shrub
Letter: R
Meaning: End of a cycle or problem.

to study this month Straif – Blackthorn Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Purple
Class: Chieftain
Letter: SS, Z, ST
Meaning: Resentment; Confusion; Refusing to see the truth

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Tides for Alsea Bay
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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
M   23      Low  12:58 AM     1.1   7:24 AM     Set 12:33 AM      55
~    23     High   7:48 AM     7.0   4:42 PM    Rise  2:14 PM
~    23      Low   2:03 PM     2.9
~    23     High   7:26 PM     5.9

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – When spiders weave their webs by Noon, fine weather is coming soon.

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Journal Prompt – Wiki – What do you like to do when it is really hot outside?

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Quotes

~   Failure is a sign that you’re trying. -Kerr Cuhulain
~   A poor surgeon hurts one person at a time. A poor teacher hurts 130. – Ernest Boyer
~   A person’s worth in this world is estimated according to the value they put on themselves. – Jean De La Bruyere
~   Religion is about creation, and for that reason religion should be about the earth. – Laurie Cabot

Star-Talk

            ‘Are you awake, Gemini,
This frosty night?’
‘We’ll be awake till reveille,
Which is Sunrise,’ say the Gemini,
‘It’s no good trying to go to sleep:
If there’s wine to be got we’ll drink it deep,
But sleep is gone for to-night,
But sleep is gone for to-night.’

‘Are you cold too, poor Pleiades,
This frosty night?’
‘Yes, and so are the Hyades:
See us cuddle and hug,’ say the Pleiades,
‘All six in a ring: it keeps us warm:
We huddle together like birds in a storm:
It’s bitter weather to-night,
It’s bitter weather to-night.’

‘What do you hunt, Orion,
This starry night?’
‘The Ram, the Bull and the Lion,
And the Great Bear,’ says Orion,
‘With my starry quiver and beautiful belt
I am trying to find a good thick pelt
To warm my shoulders to-night,
To warm my shoulders to-night.’

‘Did you hear that, Great She-bear,
This frosty night?’
‘Yes, he’s talking of stripping me bare
Of my own big fur,’ says the She-bear,
‘I’m afraid of the man and his terrible arrow:
The thought of it chills my bones to the marrow,
And the frost so cruel to-night!
And the frost so cruel to-night!’

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Thanksgiving Magick – Turkey Day Bits 3

Did you Know? Thanksgiving – November 28, 2002 (This was from a newsletter, now defunct)
The first American Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621, to commemorate the harvest reaped by the Plymouth Colony after a harsh winter. In that year Governor William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving. The colonists celebrated it as a traditional English harvest feast, to which they invited the local Wampanoag Indians.

Days of thanksgiving were celebrated throughout the colonies after fall harvests. All thirteen colonies did not, however, celebrate Thanksgiving at the same time until October 1777. George Washington was the first president to declare the holiday, in 1789.

By the mid-1800s, many states observed a Thanksgiving holiday. Poet and editor Sarah J. Hale lobbyied for a national Thanksgiving holiday. During the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln, looking for ways to unite the nation, discussed the subject with Hale. In 1863 he gave his Thanksgiving Proclamation, declaring the last Thursday in November a day of thanksgiving.

In 1939, 1940, and 1941 Franklin D. Roosevelt, proclaimed Thanksgiving the third Thursday in November. Congress passed a joint resolution in 1941 decreeing that Thanksgiving should fall on the fourth Thursday of November.

Did you Know?
A lot of what we learned in grade school and even high school is “history made simple.” Here is some information about Pilgrims you may not know.

“Mainstream Englishmen considered the Pilgrims to be deliberate religious dropouts who intended to found a new nation completely independent from non-Puritan England. In 1643 the Puritan/Pilgrims declared themselves an independent confederacy, one hundred and forty- three years before the American Revolution. They believed in the imminent occurrence of Armegeddon in Europe and hoped to establish here in the new world the “Kingdom of God” foretold in the book of Revelation. They diverged from their Puritan brethren who remained in England only in that they held little real hope of ever being able to successfully overthrow the King and Parliament and, thereby, impose their “Rule of Saints” (strict Puritan orthodoxy) on the rest of the British people. So they came to America not just in one ship (the Mayflower) but in a hundred others as well….”

The Puritans were not just simple religious conservatives persecuted by the King and the Church of England for their unorthodox beliefs. They were political revolutionaries who not only intended to overthrow the government of England, but who actually did so in 1649! (To learn about that, read about Cromwell who became, “Lord Protector of England.”)

In 1621 the Plymouth colonists and the Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast which is now known as the first Thanksgiving. The only two items that historians know for sure were on the menu are venison and wild fowl, which are mentioned in primary sources.

Did you Know?
Foods that were available to the pilgrims at the time were:
SEAFOOD: Cod, Eel, Clams, Lobster
WILD FOWL: Wild Turkey, Goose, Duck, Crane, Swan, Partridge, Eagles
MEAT: Venison, Seal
GRAIN: Wheat Flour, Indian Corn
VEGETABLES: Pumpkin, Peas, Beans, Onions, Lettuce, Radishes, Carrots
FRUIT: Plums, Grapes
NUTS: Walnuts, Chestnuts, Acorns
HERBS and SEASONINGS: Olive Oil, Liverwort, Leeks, Dried Currants, Parsnips

Foods that may not have been available were:
HAM: There is no evidence that the colonists had butchered a pig by this time, though they had brought pigs with them from England.
SWEET POTATOES/POTATOES: These were not common. (Southern food.)
CORN ON THE COB: Corn was kept dried out at this time of year.
CRANBERRY SAUCE: The colonists had cranberries but no sugar at this time.
PUMPKIN PIE: It’s not a recipe that exists at this point, though the pilgrims had recipes for stewed pumpkin.
CHICKEN/EGGS: We know that the colonists brought hens with them from England, but it’s unknown how many they had left at this point or whether the hens were still laying.
MILK: No cows had been aboard the Mayflower, though it’s possible that the colonists used goat milk to make cheese.

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Silliness –

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