Daily Stuff 12-24-21 Kolada

Hi, folks!

The shop opens at 1pm. Winter hours are Thurs-Mon. 1-6pm. Holiday hours 12/24 until 8pm. Closing on 12/31 at 4pm. Closed 12/25 and 1/1. Featured photo by Paul Didsayabutra.

[Posting at 7pm] Rain gauge at noon on 12/22 – 0.1 inches, 12/23 – 1.1 inches. Cloudy, 45F, wind at 2-11mph and gusting, AQI 21-36, UV1. Chance of rain 93% today and 83% tonight. SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY 4pm Fri – 4am Sat. The forecast for today is for possible thunderstorms from 2am-2pm, and lots of rain/wind during that time. The rest of the day likely to be lighter for rain, then more rain on Sunday, but the temps are dropping. Sunday evening through Tuesday is rain and snow, mixed! Wednesday should be dry, but cloudy, then showers after that. Today’s high should be around 43F, which is cold enough, but will drop gradually to 35 on Wed.! …and the nights will be colder still. It won’t start warming back up until the end of the week! Make Holiday plans carefully! 1 firespot, no fires.

The part of Tuesday evening after the newsletter went out was all writing, for hours, and I’m not yet caught up on a couple of blogs! We went home around 8am on Wednesday and just fell into bed and slept. I was up around 4:30 and Tempus around 6pm. Needless to say we didn’t get a lot done. We ate, talked over our “January Vacation”, which we still haven’t decided on, completely, and went back to bed!

I woke around 10 to a rumble of thunder. From then until past midnight we had some really interesting weather! There were 3 bouts of flash and bang, with rain between. By the time the 3rd one came along I had the lights off and the blinds open. I would swear that Svarog, Dadzbog and Perun were having quite the bowling match! …and the victor popped open the bubbly and it froze on the way down. That was *quite* some hailstorm. Someone in Waldport picked up a stone that was 1/2 an inch across!

The dishwasher is acting up, so I have a lot of dishes that haven’t gone back home and that stopped me doing the tea bread, (yet again) after Tempus took off for the newspaper route. I spent time instead getting the peel off an orange, chopping that, getting the pith off the fruit and segmenting it, to go into a Christmas wine. We’ll just buy a bottle of plain white wine, add the oranges, some cranberries, a couple of whole cloves, a cinnamon stick and a few cherries (canned) during the evening, and let it sit, then serve it hot. Nukers are great for mulling wine! Chopped (outer) peel is going into the tea bread, if I can ever get it baked! Oranges are for prosperity. I also peeled and chopped veg for stuffing and side dishes. That gets me some distance ahead of the game.

I read some and toddled off to bed, waking when Tempus got in, momentarily, and then going back to sleep. We had still some laundry to get together before we came in so we were late, again. Dang… We *will* do better than this!

We were busy yesterday, for winter at least. We had a lady in who moved here this past May and we talked special places to visit out here… a whole coven with associated friends and such, a couple from Idaho, another from Montreal of all places, several from the Valley and some more folks from the coast. 30 people? Tempus took off to do the laundry by 4pm. There was a lull after 5 and then a fellow came in looking for tarot decks. We had a good chat.

Tempus was back before 6:30. I was still working on this, so he started in a few chores, one of which was getting my bowls and beaters and such re-washed in the machine, then went out to run errands. I’m also going to set up a chocolate pie tonight, along with the tea bread and wine. …and then he gathered up some of the dishes.

Today we should be open on time, although we’re going to stop and pay Jeffrey for the maple syrup he dropped off, first. After we’re I need to have Tempus go to the post office and bank and so on. We’re going to be busy, but we’ll stay open until 8pm for last minute shopping.

A photo from Facebook by Paul Didsayabutra on ‎Oregon Images from 12/23/17. Vista House and Scenic Highway. 

220px-Symphoricarpos_albus_003

Today’s plant is the SnowberrySymphoricarpos albus. My kids used to call this “popcorn plant”, which is a name I’ve heard from others, too. The white berries are used as a food, a soap, and for hand lotion. It doesn’t have any magickal uses that I know of, although the folk magicks for this bush amongst the Slavs say that it is “proper” as an offering to statues of the gods. Also it should have the properties of purification and healing, just going by the medicinal uses and the fact that it will re-grow from the root and is planted as riparian erosion control and around abandoned mines and other such places.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphoricarpos_albus

Yule Log 122413

Today is a celebration of the Yule Log and the customs of this time of the year! Traditionally the Yule Log burns for the 12 days of Christmas, lighted tonight. Here’s more on the Yule Log.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yule_log  …and here is a page about the Yule Log TV program  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yule_Log_%28TV_program%29  There are even links at the end to get you to the webcast!

magick motif slav Kolovrat Rodnover

Kolada – Studen (December) 24-31 – This is one of the most important pagan Slavic holidays. At the time of the Winter Solstice, we sing songs for Lada and of praise to Perun who are prisoner now under frost and snow. During these days we celebrate our Gods by drinking a toast to them and burning bonfires deep within the forest. We wend our way singing from house to house, bemasked and dancing as we go. Under the aegis of the New Year, we sacrifice a Goat:

slavic-yule-goat

Behind a large mountain
Beside a swift river
Within a dark forest,
Big bonfires are lit.
On benches around the fire,
These benches made of oak,
Men of reknown on these benches seated
Famous men, beautiful ladies
Sing Kolada’s songs.
The Old Man in the center, seated
Grinds his knife of iron;
Boiling hot, boiling
With the goat nearby…
The time of sacrifice for the goat. – (From an ancient song)

The shop opens at 1pm! Winter hours are 11am-6pm Thursday through Monday, Holiday hours 12/24 until 8pm. Closing on 12/31 at 4pm. Closed 12/25 and 1/1. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

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Today’s Astro & Calendar

Moon in Leo

Full Moon – The day of, the day before, and day after the true Full Moon. “And better it be when the moon is full!”! Prime time for rituals for prophecy, for spells to come to fruition, infusing health and wholeness, etc. A good time for invoking deity. FRUITION Manifesting goals, nurturing, passion, healing, strength, power. Workings on this day are for protection, divination. “extra power”, job hunting, healing serious conditions Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. God/dess Aspect: Mother/Abundance/Kingship – – Associated God/desses: Danu, Cerridwen, Gaia, Aphrodite, Isis, Jupiter, Amon-Ra. Phase ends on 12/20 at 8:36am. Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 1/17/22? Waning Gibbous Moon – Best time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. – Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 12/26 at 6:24pm.

Jupiter has moved some 6° to the upper left 3rd-magnitude Delta Capricorni, while Saturn has migrated nearly to the center of Capricornus’s dim boat-shape. And can you catch Mercury below Venus yet? Look early!

The Jupiter-Saturn-Venus line at dusk slowly continues to evolve. Saturn is now a little closer to Venus; a month ago it was closer to Jupiter. And the whole line is sliding farther to the lower right.

And the line is now growing longer again, not shorter. If you were hoping Jupiter was on its way to a conjunction with Venus, nope. Venus is now diving away back down toward the Sun (it passes the Sun in daytime on January 8th). As for Jupiter and Saturn, their own next conjunction doesn’t come until November 2, 2040.

Celestial Christmas tree – The Christmas Tree Cluster floats upside-down above the Cone Nebula in Monoceros. The bright star just off the tip of the Cone is the top of the tree, while the brightest star in the frame — S Monocerotis — marks the trunk. – ESO

In celebration of the upcoming holiday, let’s enjoy the Christmas Tree Cluster tonight. Also cataloged as NGC 2264, this young group of stars is located between the Fox Fur and Cone nebulae in Monoceros the Unicorn. For the best views, you’ll want to wait a few hours after sunset but before the Moon has risen to get the darkest skies. The Christmas Tree Cluster is located in northern Monoceros, about halfway on a line drawn between Gomeisa in Canis Minor and Betelgeuse in Orion. Perhaps the easiest way to find it is to locate 2nd-magnitude Alhena in Gemini and drop about 6.5° south. The triangular cluster of stars is inverted with respect to the Cone Nebula, so their narrow tips are adjacent. Under good conditions, you can spot this small cluster with the naked eye; otherwise, binoculars or a small telescope will easily bring it out. Note that the tree may appear upside-down or sideways in your field of view, depending on the layout of your optics and its position in the sky. The Christmas Tree Cluster even hides another wintry treat: the so-called Stellar Snowflake Cluster. This is a group of young stars scattered on the sky so they look a bit like the arms of a snowflake. Unfortunately, these stars are still embedded within the dense gas and dust that formed them, and remain hidden from your eyes in visible light. They were identified by the Spitzer Space Telescope, whose forte was to look at the longer wavelengths in the infrared portion of the spectrum.

Uranus (magnitude 5.7, in Aries north of the head of Cetus) is very high in the southeast in early evening. See Bob King’s story and finder chart.

Runic half-month of Jera/ Jara 12/13-12/27 – Jara signifies the completion of natural cycles, such as fruition, and has a more transcendent meaning of mystic marriage of Earth and Cosmos. *Ø* Wilson’s Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | December 13 Runic half-month of Eihwaz/Eoh 12/28-1/11 Represents the dead, and the yew tree, sacred to Winter shamanism. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books,

NIGHT SKY MAP FOR DECEMBER 2021https://www.almanac.com/night-sky-map-december-rotation-stars

Sun in Capricorn

Goddess Month of Astrea runs from 11/28 – 12/25
Goddess Month of Hestia runs from 12/26 – 1/22

Celtic tree month of Ruis (Elder) (Nov 25 – Dec 22)
Secret of the Unhewn Stone, Dec 23
Celtic Tree Month of Beth/Birch,
Uranus (1/18/22) Retrograde
Color – Coral
©2021 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

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Celtic Tree Month of Ruis/Elder  Nov 25 – Dec 22 – Ruis – (RWEESH), elder – Celtic tree month of Ruis (Elder) commences (Nov 25 – Dec 22) – Like other Iron Age Europeans, the Celts were a polytheistic people prior to their conversion to (Celtic) Christianity. The Celts divided the year into 13 lunar cycles (months or moons). These were linked to specific sacred trees which gave each moon its name. Today commences the Celtic tree month of Elder.
Elder or Elderberry (Sambucus) is a genus of fast-growing shrubs or small trees in the family Caprifoliaceae. They bear bunches of small white or cream coloured flowers in the Spring, that are followed by bunches of small red, bluish or black berries. The berries are a very valuable food resource for many birds. Common North American species include American Elder, Sambucus canadensis, in the east, and Blueberry Elder, Sambucus glauca, in the west; both have blue-black berries. The common European species is the Common or Black Elder, Sambucus nigra, with black berries.
The common elder (Sambucus nigra L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (33 feet) in damp clearings, along the edge of woods, and especially near habitations. Elders are grown for their blackish berries, which are used for preserves and wine. The leaf scars have the shape of a crescent moon. Elder branches have a broad spongy pith in their centers, much like the marrow of long bones, and an elder branch stripped of its bark is very bone-like. The red elder (S. racemosa L.) is a similar plant at higher elevations; it grows to 5 m (15 feet). Red elder extends its native range to northern North America, and it is cultivated along with other native species, but common elders are seldom seen in cultivation. Elders are in the Honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae).

Ruis – Elder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: Makeup days of the thirteenth Moon
Color: Red
Class: Shrub
Letter: R
Meaning: End of a cycle or problem.

to study this month Straif – Blackthorn Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Purple
Class: Chieftain
Letter: SS, Z, ST
Meaning: Resentment; Confusion; Refusing to see the truth

Secret of the Unhewn Stone, Dec 23 – (This is the blank day in this calendar, the one day of the year that is not ruled by a tree and its corresponding Ogham alphabet character. Its name denotes the quality of potential in all things.)

Graves (1966) makes a case for an additional “blank” ogham, “the unhewn dolmen arch”, which he assigns to the mistletoe, a plant for which there is abundant evidence of its ritual importance to the Celts. There are two common mistletoes in Europe, both of which live as parasites on trees. The common mistletoe (Viscum album L.) parasitizes many tree species, including oaks in the western part of its range. It forms white berries between Samhain and Yule. The yellow-berried mistletoe (Loranthus europaeus L.) does not extend to western Europe. It is found primarily on oaks. It is most likely the “golden bough”, being more common in the eastern Mediterranean than the common mistletoe. The common mistletoe has been cultivated in North American for the Yule trade, and there are several native mistletoes in the genus Phoradendron. Mistletoes are in the Mistletoe family (Viscaceae).

Celtic Tree Month of Beth/Birch, Dec 24 – Jan 20, Beith – (BEH), birch – The silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) is the most common tree birch in much of Europe. It grows up to 30 m (100 feet) high, but is more often found in spreading clumps on sandy soils. It is one of the first trees to colonize an area after a mature forest is cut; this is probably a large part of its symbolic connection with new beginnings. It is cultivated in North America, often under the name of weeping birch. The three trees in my front yard form root sprouts that would take over the bed where they are planted if I didn’t cut them back. The common birch (B. pubescens Ehrh.) is almost as widespread as the silver birch, but grows primarily on acid or peaty soils. It can reach 20 m (65 feet) in height. Birches are members of the Birch family (Betulaceae). Curtis Clark

Beth – Birch – Ogam letter correspondences –
Month: November
Color: White
Class: Peasant
Letter: B
Meaning: New Beginnings; Changes; Purification.

Phagos – Beech Ogam letter correspondences to study this month
Month: None
Color: Orange-brown
Class: Chieftain
Letter: PH, IO
Meaning: New experiences and information coming

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Tides for Alsea Bay
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Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time     Feet   Sunset                                    Visible
F    24     High   4:20 AM     6.7   7:51 AM     Set 11:37 AM      81
~    24      Low   9:40 AM     3.7   4:42 PM    Rise 10:12 PM
~    24      High   3:03 PM     7.1
~    24      Low  10:09 PM     0.4

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Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Do not lose faith in yourself.

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Journal Prompt – Are there any special holiday traditions? Decorations? Foods? Treats? that your family likes?

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Quotes

~   Eskimos had over two hundred different words for snow, without which their conversation would probably have got very monotonous. So they would distinguish between thin snow and thick snow, light snow and heavy snow, sludgy snow, brittle snow, snow that came in flurries, snow that came in drifts, snow that came in on the bottom of your neighbor’s boots all over your nice clean igloo floor, the snows of winter, the snows of spring, the snows you remember from your childhood that were so much better than any of your modern snow, fine snow, feathery snow, hill snow, valley snow, snow that falls in the morning, snow that falls at night, snow that falls all of a sudden just when you were going out fishing, and snow that despite all your efforts to train them, the huskies have pissed on. – Douglas Adams in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
~   You are the shining blade that both harms and heals. – Kerr Cuhulain
~   The Opposition crowd could not raffle a chook in a pub. – Paul Keating
~   There are no great things, only small things with great love. Happy are those. – Mother Teresa

The Christmas Tree

The holly’s up, the house is all bright,
The tree is ready, the candles alight:
Rejoice and be glad, all children tonight!

The mother sings of our Lord’s good grace
Whereby the Child who saved our race
Was born and adored in a lowly place,

Once more the shepherds, as she sings,
Bend low, and angels touch their strings:
With “Glory” they hail the King of kings.

The children listening round the tree
Can hear the heavenly minstrelsy,
The manger’s marvel they can see,

Let every house be ready tonight —
The children gathered, the candles alight —
That music to hear, to see that sight. – Words: Carl August Peter Cornelius, Translated by H. N. Bate, Source: Anne Thaxter Eaton, ed., Welcome Christmas! A Garland Of Poems. New York: The Viking Press, 1955.

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Yule Magick – Recipes

Orange-Cranberry chicken with sweet potatoes

1 Orange
1 4lb.Roasting Chicken
1/2 teaspoon Pepper
1 pound Sweet Potatoes
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1 cup Chicken Broth
1 cup Whole berry Cranberry Sauce
2 Tablespoons White Wine
Vinegar

  1. Preheat oven to 375%.Grate rind from orange (don’t include the bitter white part).Rinse chicken & pat dry.
  2. Sprinkle with salt, pepper & 1/2 the grated orange rind.
  3. Place, breast side up, on a rack in large roasting pan. 
  4. Roast for 30 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile pare & cut the sweet potatoes into 1 inch slices, then toss with Olive oil.
  6. Place in single layer in the bottom of roasting pan.
  7. Continue roasting 1 hour & 45 minutes, turning potatoes occasionally & basting chicken & potatoes frequently, until the chicken juices run clear when the thickest part of the thigh is pierced with fork & leg moves freely.
  8. During the last 1/2 hour of roasting, combine Chicken broth, cranberry sauce & vinegar in a small saucepan.
  9. Bring to boiling over med. heat.
  10. Boil 20 min. or until reduced to 1 1/2 cups.
  11. Peel white pith from orange, seed flesh & chop.
  12. Stir remaining rind & chopped orange into saucepan;
  13. simmer 5 min. Let Chicken rest for 20 minutes before carving. Cut chicken in half lengthwise down the middle.
  14. Spoon Cranberry Sauce mixture over chicken & serve with Sweet Potatoes.  

Shortest Day Ham Loaf

1 pound ground pork
1/2 cup fine bread crumbs
1 pound ground ham
1 medium tomato, chopped
2 eggs
1/4 cup milk

Mix all ingredients above and shape into 2 individual loaves. In a saucepan combine:
1 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup vinegar
1 teaspoon dried mustard
1/2 cup water

Bring sauce to a boil, pour over the loaves, place loaves in a 350 degree oven and bake for 1 hour, basting regularly. Makes 10-12 servings.

Holiday Shrimp Scampi By Zola Gorgon  – Serves 4 – This dish can be served anytime, but the red and green elements really play up a Christmas theme. It’s simple and elegant and really FAST. You can make this in just a few minutes to really impress your guests.

  • 12 jumbo shrimp (Peeled and deveined. Leave their tails on if you want to be fancy.)
  • 1 bunch of green onions, diced thinly, with some of the green parts
  • 1/2 green pepper, diced
  • 1/2 red pepper, diced
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley
  • 3/4 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 2 Tbl lemon juice

Melt the butter in a large sauté pan. At the same time, add the green onions, the red and green pepper and the parsley. Sauté on Medium heat until the onions are tender and the green and red peppers have loosened up a bit but still have bite to them.

Add the shrimp. Cook the large shrimp until they are no longer opaque in the middle. This should take about 3 minutes. They will curl in the process.

Take the shrimp out of the pan with a tongs and set them on the serving plates 3 to a plate. Balance the third one up against the other two to give your presentation depth. Add the white wine to the skillet and turn it on Medium High so it boils. Boil down the mixture for 1 full minute and add the lemon juice.

Now spoon this sauce over the shrimp and Voilà!

Egyptian Kabobs
2 whole chicken breasts, skinned and boned
1 tablespoon yogurt
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon tumeric
1/8 teaspoon dry mustard
½ teaspoon curry powder
1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon vinegar
8 thin onion slices
4 small tomatoes

  1. Cut each chicken into 16 squares.
  2. Combine with the yogurt, salt, turmeric, mustard, curry powder, cardamom, lemon juice and vinegar and let stand for 1/2 hour.
  3. Thread on skewers 2 chicken pieces, 1 slice of onion, 2 chicken
    pieces, 1/2 tomato.
  4. Repeat till all ingredients are used.
  5. Cook slowly, turning occasionally and brushing with the marinade, over hot coals OR under the broiler till the chicken is tender, about 10 minutes.
  6. Transfer to a hot platter, sprinkle with lemon juice and garnish with fresh tomatoes, green pepper rings and fresh mint or parsley.

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Silliness – The classic

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