Daily Stuff 12-6-17 Old Nick and St. Nick

Hi, folks!

Lighted house count – 18+107=115

Featured photo by Arthur Bartlett. Minus Tide at 8:50 PM of -1.4 feet.

It’s nearly 60F! That high that is messing with S.Cal over the last couple of days shifted our temps upwards, too. There’s wind in some places and not others. Not a breath of it here, but at the airport and in a couple of spots along the beaches it’s in the teens. 59F, humidity at 39% and no chance of rain until maybe Friday, a week from now!

Yesterday started slowly. We had coffee and some breakfast while I was getting the newsletter out, then watched a couple of Townsend videos and talked history for awhile until around 3pm. Tempus went upstairs to do some chores while I worked on plants, getting them placed where they need to be over the winter and then getting the crocuses into a pot so that they’ll bloom this spring. When Tempus came back downstairs he got some dirt into the pot so that it will settle once it rains again and helped move some of the other plants back into better shelter, so we’ll have some greens and herbs over the winter.

As we were heading for the shop, the sky was a blue-grey bowl turned upside down over us. The edges had a golden glaze, except for a couple of splotches where a careless hand splashed some white glaze and the burning gem of the golden sun, backed by striped of pink-gold cirrus.

I played a little with my advent calendars. Some of these digital ones are fun! …and the real one from the Chocolate Frog is a small milk chocolate every day, which is yum! I finally got going on newsletters. Not sure what Tempus was up to, although he scrubbed out my water jug and put away some jars and then after that went out to service the car.

I turned my little heater on and rucked up my skirt on that side and got warmed up just fine. We still haven’t turned the heat on in the shop but once, but it was *chilly*, then Tempus turned on the furnace. That was nice!

Eventually he made potpies for supper again, which occasioned opening the doors since the shop smoked up. He headed for Newport at just about the time when I finished setting up the newsletters, but he had to run around and find some things that he put away and I didn’t before he left.

I worked for awhile on some waxed fabric food covers and got another 10 done. We don’t have them for sale, yet, since I’m still experimenting with how best to do a batch of them. I spent awhile tagging finished pieces and doing the last bits on some pouches for a box of goodies that are going out. By 12:20 Tempus was on the road and by 1:30 my pie was in the fridge, all set up. By 2:30 the box was packed.

Tempus picked me up before 4am, although I had dozed off so I’m not certain exactly what time it was. We had a lovely drive in the moonlight, counting lighted houses as we dropped off the papers.

For most of the drive She had a 22 degree halo from the high cloud that was covering part of the western/southwestern sky. It was thin enough to see stars through, so perfect conditions for halos and at one point I think there was actually a sub-moon on the bottom side of the halo.

The moonlight on the river was lovely, too, some of the stars were actually reflecting along with the moonlight and the glimpses of the moonsparkles on the ocean were breath-taking. ….well, squee-making. 🙂

It was starting to get light on the last few drops and as we crossed the bridge, heading home, we could see the lightening sky about the eastern horizon. The Moon was still shiningdown from the west, lighting the pathway and Tempus just fell into bed, with me a short time after.

Today is going to be interesting. We have to get that pie baked and set up some of the pickle things and then we’re taking a drive to North Bend to a potluck that the group down there has each month, the same as our group does. I’m also dropping off the box of stuff that got packed last night to go to the event this weekend. I’m sad I’m going to miss that, but with no transportation…. well, it’s going to be a long day because that’s a 2 1/2 hour drive.

By Arthur Bartlett on 12/4/17 Harbor Island, Seattle, WA.

220px-Rhubarb_flowerToday’s Plant is RhubarbRheum rhabarbarum. Best known as “pie plant” or in strawberry and rhubarb jam this is a wonderful and nutritious stalk vegetable, that has been legally counted as a fruit, because of its uses. The roots have been used as a laxative for thousands of years, and the stalks, while strong-tasting when uncooked and with no sugar are delicious in sauces, pies, jellies, food motif Rhubarb_Piejuice and so on, but the leaves are poisonous. It is very easy to grow since the roots will over-winter, even if the stalks die back and it’s one of the earliest vegetables to be harvestable. – Feminine, Venus Earth. – Wear a dried piece to help with stomach or gut pain and general protection. The pie served to a mate helps to maintain fidelity and is an aphrodisiac, especially when combined with strawberries.

220px-Krampus-Postkarte_um_1900If you ever wondered why Old Nick and St. Nick…. The bishop of Myra destroyed the temple of Artemis whose feast day was Dec. 6. He supposedly punched Arius in the face during the Council of Nicea**. Not the nicest guy… and quite a number of the Continental folklore of The Black Gentleman resembles the stories of this bishop. The Krampus, Cert or SwartPiet has taken on some of the punishment aspects of this guy. The orange in the toe of the stocking is the old Sun-symbol from the strenae, the green, gift-bearing branches of old Rome. Candy canes are the bishop’s crozier or shepherd’s crook.
**The “Arian Heresy” that Nicolas objected to is the contention that Jesus was created by God, not the same as God. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arian_heresy

The shop is open 11-7pm Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Holiday Hours. We will be closing early on 12/24 and 12/31 and closed 12/25 and 1/1. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

******

Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 12/17 at 10:30pm. Waning Gibbous Moon – Best time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. – Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 12/9 at 11:51pm. 

Mars and Spica look down at Jupiter in the dawn. And, can you get a last glimpse of Venus barely above the pre-sunrise horizon?
The five brightest stars of Cassiopeia are usually called a W, but late these nights Cas turns over to become a wide M, very high in the north.
The late-evening waning Moon shines below Pollux and Castor >>>and left of Procyon.
Uranus (magnitude 5.7, in Pisces) and Neptune (magnitude 7.9, in Aquarius) are well placed in the southeast and south, respectively, in early evening. Use our finder charts online or in the October Sky & Telescope, page 50.

Goddess Month of Astrea runs from 11/28 – 12/25
Celtic tree month of Ruis/Elder Nov 25 – Dec 22 
Runic half-month of Isa/ Is November 28-12 Literally, ‘ice’: a static period. The time of waiting before birth. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992 Runic half-month of Jera/ Jara 12/13-12/27 – Jara signifies the completion of natural cycles, such as fruition, and has a more transcendent meaning of mystic marriage of Earth and Cosmos. *Ø* Wilson’s Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | December 13

Sun in Sagittarius
Moon in Cancer enters Leo at 12:37pm
Pallas (12/17), Mercury (12/22), Uranus (1/2/18)  Retrograde
Color – White

Planting 12/5-6

Star Chart for December – https://www.almanac.com/content/sky-map-star-chart-december-2017

******

©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

******

Celtic tree month of Ruis/Elder Nov 25 – Dec 22 – Ruis – (RWEESH), elder – Celtic tree month of Ruis (Elder) commences (Nov 25 – Dec 22) – Like other Iron Age Europeans, the Celts were a polytheistic people prior to their conversion to (Celtic) Christianity. The Celts divided the year into 13 lunar cycles (months or moons). These were linked to specific sacred trees which gave each moon its name. Today commences the Celtic tree month of Elder.
Elder or Elderberry (Sambucus) is a genus of fast-growing shrubs or small trees in the family Caprifoliaceae. They bear bunches of small white or cream coloured flowers in the Spring, that are followed by bunches of small red, bluish or black berries. The berries are a very valuable food resource for many birds.
Common North American species include American Elder, Sambucus canadensis, in the east, and Blueberry Elder, Sambucus glauca, in the west; both have blue-black berries.
The common European species is the Common or Black Elder, Sambucus nigra, with black berries. The common elder (Sambucus nigra L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (33 feet) in damp clearings, along the edge of woods, and especially near habitations. Elders are grown for their blackish berries, which are used for preserves and wine. The leaf scars have the shape of a crescent moon. Elder branches have a broad spongy pith in their centers, much like the marrow of long bones, and an elder branch stripped of its bark is very bone-like. The red elder (S. racemosa L.) is a similar plant at higher elevations; it grows to 5 m (15 feet). Red elder extends its native range to northern North America, and it is cultivated along with other native species, but common elders are seldom seen in cultivation. Elders are in the Honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae).

Ruis – Elder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: Makeup days of the thirteenth Moon
Color: Red
Class: Shrub
Letter: R
Meaning: End of a cycle or problem.

to study this month Straif – Blackthorn Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Purple
Class: Chieftain
Letter: SS, Z, ST
Meaning: Resentment; Confusion; Refusing to see the truth

******

Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
W    6     High   2:34 AM     7.6   7:38 AM     Set 10:31 AM      93
~     6      Low   8:00 AM     2.7   4:37 PM    Rise  8:24 PM
~     6     High   1:48 PM     9.1
~     6      Low   8:50 PM    -1.4

******

Affirmation/Thought for the Day – The best way to gain self-confidence is to do what you are afraid to do.

******

Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What does this quote say to you? – Life can be understood only backwards, but it must be lived forwards. — Soren Kierkegaard

******

Quotes  

~  Look at things with a mental squint. – Lewis Carroll
~  Luck affects everything. Let your hook always be cast. In the stream where you least expect it, there will be fish. – Ovid
~  Magic is about using your connections to the universe effectively. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  Neither smiles nor frowns, neither good intentions nor harsh words, are a substitute for strength. – John F. Kennedy

Life is mostly froth and bubble;
Two things stand like stone:
Kindness in another’s trouble,
Courage in your own. – Adam Lindsay Gordon (1833–70)

******

Yule Magick – Spicy Gifts For Yule

Start now making special herbal gifts and decorations with your own hands expressing holiday sentiments from your heart. We’ve searched far and wide and come up with a fine assortment of herbal ideas, recipes and crafts for you to select from.

Yule Time/Christmas Scent

3 sticks cinnamon
3 bay leaves
1/4 cup whole cloves
1/2 lemon
1/2 orange
1 quart water

Combine ingredients and simmer in a teakettle or saucepan throughout the holidays!

Cinnamon Treasures By Brenda Hyde

Cinnamon is not only easy to craft with, but it’s a smell that reflects the warmth and charm of a cozy winter home more than any other. These gifts can be used as additions to baskets filled with homemade breads, muffins or cookies. You can also package them alone for small gifts to give teachers, friends and house guests.

Mulled Tea Bags

Ingredients:
5 tsp. loose black tea
4 whole cloves
6 whole allspice berries
2 tsp. coarsely crushed cinnamon stick
1 tsp. grated orange rind
1/2 tsp. grated lemon rind
fine-mesh cheesecloth
Cotton string

Cut two five inch squares out of the cheese cloth. Place 1/2 of your tea ingredients on one square, and the other 1/2 on the second one. Bring the corners together and tie into a bag with the string. Place the teabags into a mug, with these instructions:

To brew place one tea bag in a mug and 1 cup of boiling water. Steep 5 minutes and enjoy!

If you wish you can also include a small jar of honey, an antique spoon (easily found at a thrift store), 2 cinnamon sticks for stirring and a novel to enjoy reading while drinking.

Santa Cinnamon Sticks

You will need:
1 6 inch long cinnamon stick
red, peach or cream, black and pink acrylic paint
small paintbrush
tiny stiff paintbrush for textured paint
“snow” textured paint

Paint Santa’s hat on a 1/2 inch space at the top of the stick, using textured paint for ball and trim. For face, paint 3/4 below the hat using peach or cream paint, paint eyes black and cheeks pink. Lastly use texture paint and the stiff brush to paint eyebrows and the beard. These make charming gift toppers, or additions to gift baskets and flower arrangements.

Cinnamon Christmas Ornaments

Two recipes, both simple, for making these neat ornaments that can also be used as package toppers. If making ahead, I would put each one in it’s own plastic bag and store in a cool dry place.

You will need:
4 ounces of ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon ground cloves
1 tablespoon ground nutmeg
3/4 cup of applesauce
2 tablespoons of white craft glue

These are not edible because of the glue. Mix together well, roll out and cut your shapes. Poke a hole at the top of each one for hanging before they dry. Put them on a wire rack for about a week and let them dry, turning them over about once a day.

Cinnamon Ornaments

You will need:
3/4 cup applesauce
1 4.12 ounce bottle ground cinnamon

Mix together to form a stiff dough. Roll dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut with cookie cutters. Make hole at top of ornaments on rack to dry. Let dry 1-2 days or until thoroughly dry, turning occasionally. Hang with decorative thread, ribbon or natural raffia. Makes 12-15 ornaments.

Table Decorations

You will need:
Cinnamon sticks, 4-5 inches long
natural raffia
dried flowers of your choice
hot glue gun, glue sticks

To make a centerpiece glue together two cinnamon sticks, then top with two more, gluing the four of them together. Glue dried flowers to the top of the sticks to decorate, but not overwhelm. Tie a few pieces of raffia around the middle of the sticks and flowers to form a bow with a few ends hanging slightly off the piece. Place one in front of each place setting during your holiday meal. Guests can then take home their cinnamon craft.

Cinnamon Stick Candle Holder

You will need:
1 clear glass votive candle holder
about 20 cinnamon sticks
transparent tape
scissors
hot glue gun, glue sticks

Measure the height of your holder, and add 1/2 inch. This is the length you will need to cut your cinnamon sticks.

Cover the holder completely with tape. Hot glue does not adhere well to glass, so this will give you a good surface

to glue to. Glue each stick vertically to the holder, making sure they are placed evenly, until the entire surface is covered. Use like this, or decorate with raffia, or other small holiday decorations.

Dream Pillows

1 cup mugwort
1/2 cup rose petals
1/2 cup german chamomile
1/2 cup of sweet hops
1/3 cup lavender buds
1/3 cup catnip crushed
1/4 cup peppermint
Mix the ingredients together.Make cloth bags from a 5×12 inch piece of
material and fill the bags with your mixture. Sew the top of the bag shut.
Sweet dreams!  These make great craft fair items, inexpensive gifts or neat items for gift baskets.

From Herbal Witchcraft – GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives

******

motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Working Man Blues – I became a professional fisherman, but discovered that I …couldn’t live on my net income.

Posted in Daily Stuff, Newsletter, Pagan, Wiccan | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Stuff 12-5-17 Mikulas Eve

Hi, folks!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne. Minus Tide at 8:00 PM of -1.7 feet.

It looks like a long dry stretch, the longest since 2009. According to a local weather guy these seem to happen every 8 years, give or take a bit. Enjoy while it’s going! 48F and the only wind enough to mention is at the Newport airport  and the offshore buoy and those at at 11mph. Only 65% humidity, too.

Yesterday after I got the newsletter out I started sorting mail, both virtual and right-in-the-hands. I had opened a couple of packages the day before which held some button thread and a couple of pieces of clothing. UPS showed up and we got the rest of the calendars in! There are only a few, if you haven’t nabbed one already.

I spent a good while catching up on paperwork. I also spent some time finding fabrics that I intended for largesse things for our recreation stuff. Tempus finally went in back and cleaned up some of his stuff and then I was able to sew some more.

I ended up with a counseling session in the middle of the afternoon. That took awhile.

…and I got a few whacks in a herbs and then Tempus and I ran around trying to find some things that should *not* have disappeared….

…and then I just ran out of spoons and sat. Tempus got us potpies for supper. He got the new bread loaf finished and then we headed home.

We watched a couple of Townsend’s videos and then turned in. I was up in the middle of the night, but took my time waking this morning and the dreams! I haven’t dreamed like that in a long while!

Obviously we slept in a bit this morning. We have a lot of laundry to get done and I need to sort my books out and find and put away all the grocery bags that have accumulated around here. I swear that they’re breeding!

Featured photo by Ken Gagne from 11/23/16 I’ve had tried and tried to get a pic of this pond that we see twice a day on our way to and from the shop, but never managed it. He did! He even caught the Magic Circles of the rain!

112316-ken-gagne-101-pond

Today’s Plant is Miner’s Lettuce, Claytonia perfoliata (aka winter purslane, or Indian lettuce). It’s a plant native to our area, growing and blooming in our soggy spring and drying out and dying back in the summer. I’ve seen it re-bloom in the fall. 200px-Claytonia_sibirica_EglintonIt’s a leaf vegetable that can be eaten raw or cooked like spinach. It’s really choice in salads and very high in vitamin C. It got the name because the Gold Rush miners ate it to prevent scurvy, since they really weren’t eating right. Like any lettuce or most of the salad greens it’s Feminine and Water, but as any high Vitamin C food, its planet correspondence is the Sun. – Sprinkling it inside the home brings happiness, so it’s good in floor washes or new home blessings. Carry it with you for luck and to protect from violence. Put it into sleep pillows or add to a dream catcher to keep away nightmares. I’ve actually slipped it between the mattress and sheets for this purpose. More here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miner%27s_lettuceMore on the genus here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claytonia

Sinterklaas Mikulas YuleMikulas Eve (MEE-coo-lahsh) is held the night before the Feast of St. Nicholas. In the Czech Republic, this is the equivalent of Halloween in the US. The Christmas Markets are up in every square, huge trees in front of hotels and municipal buildings and the shopping areas light up at night as bright as day. There are cookies and candies and candles in every shop window and greenery everywhere that it can be placed. On the night of December 5th, though, you will see small groups of children, about the same age as our trick-or-treat-ers, dressed up and going from door to door. Often “professionally” costumed groups show up in the hotels and markets for the tourists, but everywhere else, it’s whichever children decide to. One child is in a bishop’s robe, with a crook and miter and long white beard, usually of cotton wool. Another child is dressed all in white (called Andelicka, “Little Angel), sometimes with wings, but usually with a red sash and a wreath on her head, sometimes with lighted candles, who has a basket of dukati. A third child is dressed all in black or brown (the Sasak (SAH- shahk, the imp), is liberally smudged with soot and carries a sack, chains and either a whip or a bundle of switches. There are some other characters that occasionally show up, such as Death, the Turk, the Lost Knight, the Old Soldier, a violinist, the Miser, the Dancer, the Smart Little Maid (all characters from Czech folklore) but usually just the first three. They give goodies to small children, if “they’ve been good” and if the parents report that they have not been good, the Sasak will growl at them and threaten to pop them in his sack loaded with chains to drag them off to the “cold places”. One thing that struck me was that they collect money and goodies, not for themselves, (although they are often invited in for hot chocolate or cider and kolachki (pastries) but to pass on to other children, UNICEF, or to the food bank instead of the personal greed that our celebration gets into. More on other celebrations of this day here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Nicholas#Belgium.2C_the_Netherlands_and_the_Lower_Rhineland_.28Germany.29 plus the articles that follow on “German speaking countries” and “Central Europe”.

The shop is open 11-7pm Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Holiday Hours. We will be closing early on 12/24 and 12/31 and closed 12/25 and 1/1. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

******

Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 12/2 at 7:47am. Full Moon – The day of the day before and day after the true Full Moon. “And better it be when the moon is full!”! Prime time for rituals for prophecy, for spells to come to fruition, infusing health and wholeness, etc. A good time for invoking deity. FRUITION Manifesting goals, nurturing, passion, healing, strength, power. Workings on this day are for protection, divination. “extra power”, job hunting, healing serious conditions Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. God/dess Aspect: Mother/Abundance/Kingship – – Associated God/desses: Danu, Cerridwen, Gaia, Aphrodite, Isis, Jupiter, Amon-Ra. Phase ends on 12/3 at 7:47pm. Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 12/17 at 10:30pm. 

On Friday December 1st, Mercury and Saturn are 3° apart very low after sunset. Their visibility in bright twilight is exaggerated here. (The blue 10deg scale is about the width of your fist held at arm’s length.)
Now the waning gibbous Moon doesn’t rise until well after dark. Look for <<< Pollux to its left, and Castor above Pollux. Later into the night, you’ll find Procyon >>>  rising farther to the Moon’s lower right.

Mars and Jupiter (magnitudes +1.7, and –1.7, respectively) rise well before dawn in the east-southeast. First up is Mars, accompanied by Spica to its right or upper right. Bright Jupiter rises about an hour after Mars, still well before dawn begins.

Goddess Month of Astrea runs from 11/28 – 12/25
Celtic tree month of Ruis/Elder Nov 25 – Dec 22 
Runic half-month of Isa/ Is November 28-12 Literally, ‘ice’: a static period. The time of waiting before birth. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Sun in Sagittarius
Full Moon at 7:47am
Moon in Gemini
Mercury Retrograde 11:34pm last night…. (
Chiron (12/5), Pallas (12/17), Uranus (1/2/18)  Retrograde
Color – Amber

Harvest 12/3-4

******

©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

******

Celtic tree month of Ruis/Elder Nov 25 – Dec 22 – Ruis – (RWEESH), elder – Celtic tree month of Ruis (Elder) commences (Nov 25 – Dec 22) – Like other Iron Age Europeans, the Celts were a polytheistic people prior to their conversion to (Celtic) Christianity. The Celts divided the year into 13 lunar cycles (months or moons). These were linked to specific sacred trees which gave each moon its name. Today commences the Celtic tree month of Elder.
Elder or Elderberry (Sambucus) is a genus of fast-growing shrubs or small trees in the family Caprifoliaceae. They bear bunches of small white or cream coloured flowers in the Spring, that are followed by bunches of small red, bluish or black berries. The berries are a very valuable food resource for many birds.
Common North American species include American Elder, Sambucus canadensis, in the east, and Blueberry Elder, Sambucus glauca, in the west; both have blue-black berries.
The common European species is the Common or Black Elder, Sambucus nigra, with black berries. The common elder (Sambucus nigra L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (33 feet) in damp clearings, along the edge of woods, and especially near habitations. Elders are grown for their blackish berries, which are used for preserves and wine. The leaf scars have the shape of a crescent moon. Elder branches have a broad spongy pith in their centers, much like the marrow of long bones, and an elder branch stripped of its bark is very bone-like. The red elder (S. racemosa L.) is a similar plant at higher elevations; it grows to 5 m (15 feet). Red elder extends its native range to northern North America, and it is cultivated along with other native species, but common elders are seldom seen in cultivation. Elders are in the Honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae).

Ruis – Elder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: Makeup days of the thirteenth Moon
Color: Red
Class: Shrub
Letter: R
Meaning: End of a cycle or problem.

to study this month Straif – Blackthorn Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Purple
Class: Chieftain
Letter: SS, Z, ST
Meaning: Resentment; Confusion; Refusing to see the truth

******

Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Tu   5     High   1:42 AM     7.6   7:37 AM     Set  9:35 AM      98
~     5      Low   7:07 AM     2.5   4:37 PM    Rise  7:16 PM
~     5     High  12:58 PM     9.5
~     5      Low   8:00 PM    -1.7

******

Affirmation/Thought for the Day – I cut negative bonds of attachment to powerlessness and slavery.

******

Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – I wish… – I wish I could be like…. This person is special because….

******

Quotes  

~  If you’re weak, you just haven’t found your strength. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light. – Aristotle Onassis
~  It is mutual trust, even more than mutual interest that holds human associations together. – H. L. Mencken
~  It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. – Jiddu Krishnamurti

Oh, good gigantic smile o’ the brown old earth,
This autumn morning! How he sets his bones
To bask i’ the sun, and thrusts out knees and feet
For the ripple to run over in its mirth;
Listening the while, where on the heap of stones
The white breast of the sea-lark twitters sweet. – Robert Browning (1812–1889)

******

Yule Magick – Lore

Winter Solstice tidbit From:  http://www.widdershins.org/vol4iss6/01.htm
Reclaiming the Winter Solstice by Melanie Fire Salamander

I’m know I’m not the only person, pagan or otherwise, who approaches the winter holiday season gingerly. To begin with, Americans generally consider Christmas a time to gather with their families. Even for those who get along with their relations, the togetherness (and the cleanup afterward) can be stressful.

Further, as a non-Christian, I find it somewhat alienating how Christmas permeates our culture. It’s hard for any non-Christian to ignore — witness the Jewish households with Christmas trees.

Specifically, as a pagan, I find Christmas the height of the borrowed holiday double-bind. The holidays of the winter solstice are the pagan holidays most thieved from and later overlaid by Christianity. Granted anything appropriated by Christians from pagans can be appropriated right back, but the holiday feels somewhat marred in the process.

I think this feeling arises partly because the forced marriage of pagan and Christian traditions I grew up with doesn’t entirely work. The symbolism of giving gifts seems flawed, unless you see the receivers as avatars of the infant Christ gifted by Magi(cians), which philosophy I haven’t seen promulgated. In Christmas gift-giving, the traditional pagan solstice gifts have lost their former meanings of luck and fertility and the propitiation of the dead. Because the symbolism no longer works, greed and guilt are often the main components that remain.

Thus, when I was a child trying to be Christian, I found Christmas the holiday that required the most hypocrisy. You knew if you were told to write an essay about the true meaning of Christmas you weren’t supposed to lust for presents, but rather to harp on peace on earth and the blessings of the Christ child. Peace on earth is a fine hope, but I only wrote about it as a child because I knew I was supposed to.

But I’ve always loved the Christmas traditions of my childhood. The Christmas tree spangled with tinsel and glowing with colored lights, Christmas feasts, the house warm and scented with baking, snow on the hills, a holly wreath with blood-red berries — because these symbols were Christianized, they remained to color my childhood, and they speak as deeply to me as anything Halloween does.

More than any other Sabbat, the winter solstice I think requires a conscious act of reclaiming. We have many solstice traditions to choose from, more than meet an initial glance. It’s a glorious time, a deep symbol, the return of the sun and the many myths that stem from it. I think the time and symbol are worth reclaiming. I think we owe it to ourselves to meditate, dig deep and choose and practice the solstice traditions that most speak to us.

The pagan roots of Christmas

The early Christians quite consciously chose the pagan sun holiday for the celebration of their Son-god’s birth. Christmas falls during the Roman Saturnalia and at the birth of the Mithraic sun god. According to A Witches Bible Compleat, by Janet and Stewart Farrar, the Archbishop of Constantinople wrote that church fathers fixed the Nativity during the pagan holidays because “while the heathen were busied with their profane rites, the Christian might perform their holy ones without disturbance.”

Other Christians accused those who kept Christmas at the solstice of performing sun worship. Armenians, who celebrate Christmas on January 6, elsewhere Epiphany, called Roman Christians idolaters, according to Funk and Wagnall’s Standard Dictionary of Folklore, Mythology and Legend. Similarly, under the Puritans in 1644, the English Parliament expressly forbade observing Christmas. Augustine admitted that putting Christmas at the winter solstice was a conscious identification of the Son with the sun but defended the symbolism.

The Christmas most Americans know as children mixes a celebration of the birth of Christ with traditions from the Roman Saturnalia, the Northern European Yule, and the Celtic solstice.

Saturnalia, the great leveler

Saturnalia, a string of related festivals beginning December 17 and lasting a week in its final incarnation, celebrated the Golden Age of the Roman god Saturn. Its roots lay in a solstice ceremony designed to protect winter-sown crops. One of its signal customs was a leveling of rank and age; during Saturnalia, courts passed down no punishments, schools closed, wars ceased, gambling was encouraged, and social distinctions were leveled or reversed. The slave was equal to the freeman, and the master served the servant. All took bawdy liberty in speech and action.

Christmas inherited this turnabout of power. Early Europeans’ Christmastime saw the reign of the Lord of Misrule, called in Scotland the Abbot of Unreason. The Lord of Misrule ran the revels from All Hallows until Twelfth Night, arranging parties and theatricals and inflicting penalties for any misdeeds he saw fit. A related custom survived in York till the eighteenth century, as Doreen Valiente writes in An ABC of Witchcraft; there the people carried mistletoe to the high church altar and proclaimed (in the words of a contemporary) “`a public and universal liberty, pardon and freedom to all sorts of inferior and even wicked people at the gates of the city, towards the four quarters of heaven.'”

Saturnalia may have given us our tradition of decking interiors with evergreen boughs, and may be the source of Christmas gift-giving. In the latter days of festival week, Romans exchanged gifts of wax fruit, candles and dolls. Funk and Wagnall’s identifies the fruit as symbolizing fertility, the candles as echoing the customary new fires of solstice, and the dolls as a remnant of human sacrifice. Reports from a Roman outpost reflect the sacrificial aspect of Saturnalia, Funk and Wagnall’s notes; inhabitants there elected a King Saturn and gave him great freedom, only to ritually murder him at feast’s end.

Yule: fertility and ghosts

At the winter solstice, Scandinavians worshipped Frey, god of fertility; further south, the Angli celebrated December 24 as New Year’s Eve, called modranecht (mother night), a vigil also connected with fertility rites. In general, the traditional Yule (from the Norse Iul, meaning wheel) was a feast devoted to fertility and the ancestors, which passed on to Christmas fecund and ghostly traditions.

The Christmas roast pig is kissing cousin to julgalti, the pig offered to Frey for fertility in the coming year, according to Funk and Wagnall’s. Hence the apple in its mouth. Similarly, Yule was a time to charm grain and fruit to grow thick. Traditional Scots kept the Corn Maiden from harvest till Yule and then distributed her to the cattle, according to the Farrars. The Germans scattered the ashes of the Yule log on the fields for fertility, or kept its last charred pieces to bind in the last sheaf of the coming harvest. The French retained a piece of Yule log through the year to protect the house against fire and lightning, to ensure bountiful crops and the easy birth of calves.

The solstice was also a weather predictor, according to Funk and Wagnall’s. In more recent tradition, a white Christmas is said to mean a prosperous New Year, while a green, cloudy or hot Christmas fills the churchyard.

Yule is a time for spirits. European tradition, transferred to the Christian holiday, held that each house should be clean and prepared for Christmas before the household went to church, so the spirits could inspect it. Spirits likewise stayed for Christmas dinner. In Sweden, householders set a special table for them.

European folk beliefs say that someone who sits under a pine tree on Christmas Eve can hear the sound of angels — but death will soon follow. Death also awaits one who hears farm animals converse in the barn that night. A person born on Christmas can see spirits. Dreams on the Northern modranecht were believed to foretell the coming year, according to Nigel Pennick in The Pagan Book of Days.

We tree kings

In the British Isles, Celtic Yule traditions survive with amazing resilience. The fight of the Oak and Holly Kings, representatives of the waxing and waning year, is recalled in the still-current hunting of the wren — a custom also found in ancient Greece and Rome.

In the myth behind the practice, the robin redbreast, identified with the Oak King, caught and killed the wren, representative of the waning year and the Holly King. The robin traditionally trapped the wren in an ivy bush, in Ireland a holly bush, the Farrars write. The robin’s tree was the birch, the tree associated with the after-solstice period in the Celtic tree calendar.

In the wren hunt, according to Pennick, a group of droluns (Wren Boys) captured the wren, which during the rest of the year was sacrosanct. The droluns ensconced the bird in a lantern and trooped it around the village on a holly branch on its way to death. Alternatively, men with birch rods chased the wren and killed it. Wren Boys still tour County Clare in west Ireland on December 26, now a group of adult musicians who go door to door with a wren effigy on a holly branch. In County Mayo, Wren Boys are holly-bearing children, including girls, who knock on doors repeating a traditional verse that asks for money to bury the wren. In Scotland and the North of England, in a possibly related custom, masked and caroling children formerly celebrated Hogmany on New Year’s Eve, traveling the neighborhood soliciting oat cakes.

The wren’s rival, the robin of the waxing year, was linked to Robin Hood, according to Robert Graves in The White Goddess. Robin was a god of the witches; Graves writes that a London tract of 1693 named Robin Goodfellow an ithyphallic witch-god. In Cornwall, he notes, “robin” means phallus. Robin “Hood,” or “Hod,” was thought to exist in the hod, the log at the back of the fire, in other words the Yule log. Woodlice who ran from the burning Yule log were called “Robin Hood’s steeds,” and Robin was said to escape up the chimney as a robin. The Yule log is traditionally of oak, again connecting it with the Oak King; in some places it’s burnt bit by bit through the twelve days of Christmas, but elsewhere celebrants retain a chunk to light the next Yule log.

Another British Christmas custom recalling the kings’ fight was traditional mummery, in which the brilliantly armored St. George fought and defeated a dark Turkish knight. But, as Valiente notes, the victorious St. George immediately cried out he had killed his brother, showing that “darkness and light, winter and summer, are complementary.” A mysterious doctor revived the Turk, and all rejoiced.

Too often, as the Farrars write, this understanding of light and dark’s balance turns to a contest of good vs. evil. In Dewsbury, Yorkshire, for nearly seven centuries, church bells knelled “the Old Lad’s Passing” or “the Devil’s Knell” at Christmas Eve’s eleventh hour, warning the Devil that Christ was coming. Other connections link the Holly King and the Devil. The Farrars tie the Devil’s nickname, Old Nick, to Nik, a name for Woden, “very much a Holly King.” Santa Claus — St. Nicholas — is likewise a disguised Holly King. Not only do households put up holly garlands in his honor, in early tales he rode a horse, as Woden does, rather than driving reindeer.

More solstice tree traditions

Another Celtic Yuletide custom was wassailing, in which a group of people carried a bowl of wassail (cider) into an orchard. The celebrants chose one tree to represent the whole grove and dipped its branch tips in wassail, stuck bits of wassail-soaked cake among its twigs and sprinkled wassail on its roots, according to Pauline Campanelli in Wheel of the Year. Morris dancers might mime the abundant harvests they hoped the orchard would produce in the following year. Similarly, traditional British believed that Christmas sun shining through fruit trees foretold a big harvest, according to Funk and Wagnall’s.

It’s not surprising a culture that named its letters and months for trees had many tree customs. Only one day of the Celtic calendar lacks a ruling tree and ogham letter. The Celts called this day, December 23, the Secret of the Unhewn Stone.

Like apples, evergreens also connect with the solstice, as a symbol of eternal life. Christmas Eve mystery plays of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries combined evergreens and apples, the fruit tied to the trees’ branches. Seasonal celebrants decked interiors with holly, fir, pine, bayberry, rosemary, branches of the evergreen box shrub and also ivy and mistletoe.

Ivy is sacred both to Osiris, the Egyptian god of death and rebirth, and to the Greek wine-god Dionysos — both gods traditionally resurrected at this time of year. In the England of previous centuries, Campanelli writes, harvesters bound the last sheaf of grain with ivy and called it the Ivy Girl, a figure considered to combat the Holly Boy. This combat marks an older competition between Goddess and God, from before the Oak King’s entrance on the scene. Such a scenario also appears in the tradi- tional carol “The Holly and the Ivy.”

Mistletoe in contrast connects with the Oak King, found suspended as it is on the Celtic magick oak. The Druids collected mistletoe at the winter solstice, their ritual Alban Arthuan, as well as at the summer solstice; in winter, the mistletoe has white berries, representing the semen of the God and bringing fertility. Traditionally, a girl who stands under mistletoe tacked up indoors may be kissed by any boy who comes up.

Traditions of tree trimming and evergreen decoration may have combined to engender the Christmas tree. Campanelli writes that the first Christmas tree was decorated in Riga in Latvia, in 1510, when a local merchants’ guild carried an evergreen festooned with fake flowers to market and burned it there, a sort of combination Christmas tree and Yule log.

The Christmas tree has become popular only in the last 150 years, migrating to the United States from Germany. However, its German name, Tannenbaum, may reflect older roots; Campanelli relates the word to tinne or glastin, the sacred trees of the ancient Celts. More distantly, Funk and Wagnall’s connects the Christmas tree to flower-decorated May trees and May poles. Campanelli draws in the cult of Cybele and Attis, in which ritualists dragged a fir tree into the temple and adorned with it violets, mourning the dead Attis, soon miraculously to rise. A fir cone tips Dionysos’s thrysus, and the pine is sacred to Pan and Sylvanus. Whatever their provenance and meaning, seasonal evergreens shouldn’t hang too long. Funk and Wagnall’s says you must throw them out of doors by Epiphany; Valiente gives you till Candlemas but says if you’ve not done it then, hobgoblins will haunt you.

The Yule’s for you

Given that the Christmas we know comes from the Celtic and Northern Yules and from Saturnalia, using parts of one, several or all of these rites in your rite is only appropriate. Create a Yule of the spirits, or a ritual for garden or personal fertility. Choose a Lord or Lady of Misrule, Holly and Oak Kings or an Ivy Girl and Holly Boy.

Or turn to other traditions. Ancient Athenians at the winter solstice held the Lenaea, the Feast of Wild Women. The nine Wild Women of the ritual reenacted the death and rebirth of Dionysos. Once probably a human sacrifice, the god’s representative by classical times had become a goat kid, which the Wild Women killed, then mourned. Then Dionysos was reborn in ritual, and the Wild Women rejoiced.

The winter solstice similarly commemorated the rebirth of Egyptian Osiris, who after a mummification beginning November 3 was buried on the solstice. Two days later, his sister and wife Isis gave birth to his son and second self, the sun-god Horus — the return of light to the world.

In this hemisphere, the Hopi and Pueblo Indians of the American Southwest hold solstice rituals over several days, including kachina dances, corn and meal rites and war society ceremonies. The Hopi also perform phallic rites and hawk dances. Their neighbors the Zuni relight their sacred fire for the solstice.

You can look for inspiration to nonpagan religions. Though Judaism is a monotheistic tradition, it has roots in an ancient pagan past. Hanukkah, the Feast of Lights, most recently celebrates the dedication of a new altar in the Temple after the old had been destroyed, but the feast falls during a much more ancient Jewish solstice observance. The lighting of the lamps parallels the celebrations worldwide in which a lit fire hails the returning sun.

Work with any of these traditions, or find one of your own, perhaps connected with your heritage or travels. The solstice holiday comes woven of many strands; choose one that feels right, learn all you can about it and do what speaks to you, honoring the places and peoples your ritual comes from. Reclaim this Sabbat, and let the reborn sun fill your life with light.

Copyright © 2005 by the article’s author

******

motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Slow Down

One day a policeman stopped a motorist who had just gone through a four way stop sign and was about to give him a ticket when the motorist said. “Officer you can’t give me a ticket for that!’
“Why not” said the officer.
“Because although I did not stop I slowed right down and its almost the same.”
“But you did not stop” replied the officer, “and the sign says STOP.”
“But the way was clear and it was safe” replied the motorist.
The officer then pulls out his baton and starts hitting the motorist.
“What are you doing!” yells the motorist in surprise.
“Do you want me to slow down or stop?” says the officer.

Posted in Daily Stuff, Newsletter, Pagan, Wiccan | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Stuff 12-4-17 St. Barbara

Hi, folks!

 Featured photo by Ken Gagne. Minus Tide at 7:12 PM of -1.8 feet. Wicca 102 at 7pm.

The sky is pretty clear this morning. There are some scattered white puffs over the Coast Range and some high cloud, mostly cirrus, over the ocean, that’s even more scattered. It’s not as chilly as last night, being 48F. The water level is high enough in the hind-dunes lakes that the water lily leaves are all below the surface and various plants are yellowed and wilting down from the cold night-time temps. There’s very little wind and pretty much no chance of rain for the next ten days or so.

Tempus had found a solution while I was out, to the stretched screen problem and that got fixed right away. yesterday morning. Apparently there are a lot of folks with the same problem. https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-hardware/stretched-screen-horizontally-in-windows-10/4f209958-6e51-42c3-b0cf-5f955a323368?auth=1

I worked on newsletters for several hours, refilling files and setting up for the week. Normally, I wouldn’t have kept at it that long, but getting yesterday’s out and setting up for today and tomorrow just took that amount of time!

Tempus and I took a break in the early afternoon and talked about the videos that we’ve been wanting to make on various re-creation topics. It’s kind pie-in-the-sky since we don’t have a camera, but its fun to contemplate.

After I got a couple of day’s worth of newsletters ready to roll, I headed into the back to do some sewing. That took finding pieces that get scattered every single time I have to put things away. <sigh> I got 3 pouches finished and then my back quit. …and later went back and did 4 more.

…and we had supper, which was good, but very late, and I was totally out of spoons, so I kinda crashed at my desk.

The supermoon was surrounded by a colored corona at the shop and we got rained on during the drive home. At home though, She was just beautiful and bright! Since it was 38F we brought a bunch of the tender plants indoors and shoved a few more farther back under the trees.

Today I have more sewing to do, and I should get back to work on those herbs that I was working on last week. We also have class/esbat tonight, so I need to track down the Yule rituals, so we can figure out which will work best.

Yaquina Bay Bridge From 12/3/12 by Ken Gagne.

book orn 113A  few years ago, as a Yule Gift to all of you, I wrote up a description of how I make ornaments out of small books. These are a fun craft. If you start with a small book that suits the person you’re making it for (try bookstores, but the pharmacy across the street from us has ’em in the gift section!) or one with special nostalgic significance, you can have an inexpensive gift (or 6!)  in an afternoon. Go to this page: http://wp.me/P2xgQ8-H8 Look for this picture and click on the link below the picture (clicking the title will do nothing, clicking the pic will take you only to the pic!) …and there are a lot more tutorials on the page! Or go straight to the PDF https://ancientlightshop.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/yule-gift-2012-book-ornaments2.pdf

220px-Delphinium_pavonaceumThe local larkspursdelphinium trollifolium, and delphinium pavonaceum (which the Wiki article says is confined to the Valley, but I’ve collected out here….) are pretty flowers in shade of white, blue and purple. They’re called delphiniums after the shape of the nectary. More here  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delphinium_trolliifolium and here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delphinium_pavonaceum Other names are Larksheal and Staggerweed – Feminine, Venus, Water – The flowers frighten away venomous creatures and ghosts. Sprinkle between your eyes and a Litha fire to keep your sight clear. Use in rituals to call upon Dolphin energy.

St-barbaraToday is the feast of St. Barbara. This Virgin, & Martyr was Born in the mid third century somewhere in the Roman Empire and died in early fourth century to late third century, executed by her father for becoming a Christian. Her feast, on December 4 is no longer on Roman Catholic calendar, because they can’t prove she existed. Her symbols are  a three-windowed tower, a palm branch,  a chalice, or lightning. She is the Patron Saint of prisoners, architects, artillerymen and mathematicians. At various points in history her stories have probably been confused with pagan deities. In many of the Central European countries today, each family member will cut a twig from a tree that blooms and/or fruits. (My grandparents did this every year.) These are put in water in a warm place and the number of blossoms foretell the winter’s weather. The person whose twig blooms the most is said to be the favorite of the Goddess (usually listed as Mary….) More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Barbara

The shop is open 11-7pm Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Holiday Hours. We will be closing early on 12/24 and 12/31 and closed 12/25 and 1/1. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

******

Today’s Astro & Calendar

Full Moon – The day of the day before and day after the true Full Moon. “And better it be when the moon is full!”! Prime time for rituals for prophecy, for spells to come to fruition, infusing health and wholeness, etc. A good time for invoking deity. FRUITION Manifesting goals, nurturing, passion, healing, strength, power. Workings on this day are for protection, divination. “extra power”, job hunting, healing serious conditions Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. God/dess Aspect: Mother/Abundance/Kingship – – Associated God/desses: Danu, Cerridwen, Gaia, Aphrodite, Isis, Jupiter, Amon-Ra. Phase ends on 12/3 at 7:47pm. Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 12/17 at 10:30pm. Waning Gibbous Moon – Best time for draining the energy behind illness, habits or addictions. Magicks of this sort, started now, should be ended before the phase change to the New Moon. – Associated God/dess: Hera/Hero, Cybele, Zeus the Conqueror, Mars/Martius, Anansi, Prometheus. Phase ends at the Quarter on 12/9 at 11:51pm. 

Mars and Spica look down at Jupiter in the dawn. And, can you get a last glimpse of Venus barely above the pre-sunrise horizon?
Once the Moon is well up in the east, look to its right or lower right for Betelgeuse. The rest of Orion extends farther right or lower right.
Venus is getting lost very deep in the glare of sunrise.

Goddess Month of Astrea runs from 11/28 – 12/25
Celtic tree month of Ruis/Elder Nov 25 – Dec 22 
Runic half-month of Isa/ Is November 28-12 Literally, ‘ice’: a static period. The time of waiting before birth. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Sun in Sagittarius
Moon in Gemini enters Cancer at 12:37pm.
Chiron (12/5), Pallas (12/17), Mercury (12/22), Uranus (1/2/18)  Retrograde
Color – Silver

Harvest 12/3-4

******

©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

******

Celtic tree month of Ruis/Elder Nov 25 – Dec 22 – Ruis – (RWEESH), elder – Celtic tree month of Ruis (Elder) commences (Nov 25 – Dec 22) – Like other Iron Age Europeans, the Celts were a polytheistic people prior to their conversion to (Celtic) Christianity. The Celts divided the year into 13 lunar cycles (months or moons). These were linked to specific sacred trees which gave each moon its name. Today commences the Celtic tree month of Elder.
Elder or Elderberry (Sambucus) is a genus of fast-growing shrubs or small trees in the family Caprifoliaceae. They bear bunches of small white or cream coloured flowers in the Spring, that are followed by bunches of small red, bluish or black berries. The berries are a very valuable food resource for many birds.
Common North American species include American Elder, Sambucus canadensis, in the east, and Blueberry Elder, Sambucus glauca, in the west; both have blue-black berries.
The common European species is the Common or Black Elder, Sambucus nigra, with black berries. The common elder (Sambucus nigra L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (33 feet) in damp clearings, along the edge of woods, and especially near habitations. Elders are grown for their blackish berries, which are used for preserves and wine. The leaf scars have the shape of a crescent moon. Elder branches have a broad spongy pith in their centers, much like the marrow of long bones, and an elder branch stripped of its bark is very bone-like. The red elder (S. racemosa L.) is a similar plant at higher elevations; it grows to 5 m (15 feet). Red elder extends its native range to northern North America, and it is cultivated along with other native species, but common elders are seldom seen in cultivation. Elders are in the Honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae).

Ruis – Elder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: Makeup days of the thirteenth Moon
Color: Red
Class: Shrub
Letter: R
Meaning: End of a cycle or problem.

to study this month Straif – Blackthorn Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Purple
Class: Chieftain
Letter: SS, Z, ST
Meaning: Resentment; Confusion; Refusing to see the truth

******

Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
M    4     High  12:51 AM     7.5   7:36 AM     Set  8:30 AM      99
~     4      Low   6:17 AM     2.4   4:37 PM    Rise  6:12 PM
~     4     High  12:11 PM     9.7
~     4      Low   7:12 PM    -1.8

******

Affirmation/Thought for the Day – The people who make a difference in your life are not the ones with the most credentials, the most money, or the most awards. They are the ones that care.

******

Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What does this quote say to you? – Choose your socks by their color and your friends by their character. Choosing your socks by their character makes no sense. Choosing your friends by their color is unthinkable. – Unknown

******

Quotes  

~  I have faith in myself and believe what I say, and I personally intend to make the best of each day! – Unknown
~  I have found that among its other benefits, giving liberates the soul of the giver. – Maya Angelou
~  I have never started a poem yet whose end I knew. Writing a poem is discovering. – Robert Frost
~  I work on keeping a mind set that there are no problems…just solutions! – David Chadwick

The hills look gaunt in russet garb:
Against the sky the leafless woods
Are dark, and in their solitudes
The chill wind pierces like a barb. – Clinton Scollard (1860–1932)

******

Yule Magick – Pagan Friendly Decorations for Yule – grannysage by grannysage Last updated: 11/13/2011

Celebrating the Winter Solstice

When I decided to walk a pagan path some years ago, I still enjoyed decorating for the season. Instead of celebrating Christmas, I began to celebrate Yule or the Winter Solstice.

The Winter Solstice is the longest night of the year. In years past, when people were more in tune with the turn of the seasons, particularly in the Nordic countries, the Winter Solstice was a time of celebration that the days would once again become longer and the return of the warm season would come again.

In modern times, Yule has been attached to Christmas, which is a celebration of the birth of Jesus (except in the Southern Hemisphere where Christmas is in July and the winter solstice is in the winter, which I find to be rather odd). Finding decorations that did not have a Christmas theme became quite a challenge. It became a quest for me to find ornaments that reflected the spirit of the Yule season, not the religious celebration of Jesus’ birth.

I’ve searched the web to find those elusive Yule decorations and will attempt to explain the reasons behind some of the customs of the season.

A Symbolic Mythology

Paganism, including Wicca, is based on a symbolic mythology. The stories of the gods and goddesses from legends of old are aspects of the One Spirit, stories which humans developed to explain forces that to them were often unexplainable. The goddess giving birth to the Sun at Yule symbolizes the cycle of life, both in nature and in the lives of humans. As the earth repeats the process of death to rebirth and renewal, so do people pass through the seasons of life.

Joseph Campbell said, “Myth must be kept alive. The people who can keep it alive are the artists of one kind or another.” He also stated, “Every myth is psychologically symbolic. Its narratives and images are to be read, therefore, not literally, but as metaphors.”

The symbols associated with the Winter Solstice/Yule are therefore important to our inner consciousness, to keep us in touch with our spiritual selves. At some deep level, as we gaze and think upon these tangible representations of older traditions, we re-connect with a world filled with mystery, wonder, and infinite possibilities.

Tradition of the Yule Log

There are many stories of the history of the Yule Log, depending on what culture is being discussed. We do know that in the Nordic countries, the people would drag in a big log to celebrate the Winter Solstice. The fire symbolized the return of the light as the wheel turned from darkness of winter to the light of spring. A piece of the unburned part of the previous year’s Yule log was used to kindle the new flame. It would then be allowed to burn or smolder for 12 days and was believed to bring prosperity and protection to the household.

Many pagans today continue this tradition and if they don’t have a fireplace, they may use a smaller log with holes to hold three candles.

Mistletoe Customs

Mistletoe was considered sacred by the Druids, particularly when found on oak trees. It was considered to be the soul of the tree. It was cut using a golden sickle and caught in a white cloth, as it could not touch the ground. They used it as a remedy for many diseases.

The custom of kissing under the mistletoe comes from Scandinavian myth. The god Baldur, son of Frigga who was the goddess of Love, was killed by a spear of mistletoe. Frigga wept for her son and her tears turned to white berries on the mistletoe plant. Baldur is restored to life and Frigga, in her joy, decreed that the plant was sacred and a symbol of peace and love. Anyone who passed under it would receive a kiss.

Holly Folklore

There are many folklore beliefs surrounding holly. It has long been associated with midwinter because of its evergreen leaves. It was consider to provide strong protection; wearing a sprig of holly could protect one from mischievous fairy folk.

Bringing holly leaves into the home brings luck by allowing the friendly fairies a place to play. One should never cut a holly branch without asking the tree for permission, and then an already broken branch should be gently removed.

Holly is a symbol to remind us that even though the ground is barren at midwinter, the seasons turn and soon the earth will be green and fertile once again.

You Can Never Have Too Many Fairies

As a former fairy collector, I always said “you can never have too many fairies.” Of course that changed when we transitioned to living in an RV full time. But I still find fairies beautiful.

Why Put Antlers On a Tree?

Antlers can symbolize several things. If your animal totem is a deer or an elk, you might want to connect with its energy with an antler ornament.

Antlers are also symbolic of the Horned God, the Forest Lord (no it is not the devil, don’t worry). The Horned God is an archetype of nature and of the hunt and is the male consort of the Goddess. He gives of his energy so all may have life. The Horned God is reborn into this life at the Winter Solstice. It is difficult to describe all of his aspects in such a small space, so I shall let pagan author, Starhawk, describe him for me.

“For men, the Horned God is the image of inner power and potency that is more than merely sexual. He is the undivided Self, in which mind is not split from body, nor spirit from flesh. United, both can function at the peak of emotional and creative power….

The God embodies the power of feeling. His animal horns represent the truth of undisguised emotion, which seeks to please no master. He is untamed. But untamed feelings are very different from enacted violence. The God is the life force, the life cycle. He remains within the orbit of the Goddess; his power is always directed towards the service of life. (Starhawk, THE SPIRAL DANCE)

Prosperity Ornament

You can add decorations to your Yule tree as visualizations for dreams or goals you wish to manifest in the next year.

Prosperity can mean many different things; wealth, happiness or good fortune. A tree is prosperous when it is full of leaves, bearing fruit or providing shelter. The tree of prosperity reminds us that not only wealth is the path to prosperity. By finding our true happiness or helping others, we may grow and prosper.

Bring Back the Light

The Winter Solstice is all about bringing back the light to a darkened world. The sun, which appeared to ancient people as being dead, is reborn to return again to warm the earth. Pagans love to celebrate with lights, both indoors and out. My husband is the king of lights in this house, so I asked him to pick out what he would choose for a Yule tree.

He chose white lights because white is the combination of all the colors of light and appears often in nature. In symbolic terms, white embodies peace, tranquility, purification; truth, spirituality, and sincerity.

Bring Back the Light by Gypsy

This is a classic pagan Winter Solstice song and one of my favorites. Sing along if you like….here are a few of the words.

Bring back the Light
Light never ending
Through dark of night
this call we are sending
With all our might
Bring back the Light
Bring back the Light
Our hearts are open
On Solstice night
We are invoking
The Lord of Light
Bring back the Light

Animal Totems

Many pagans feel a connection with their animal totems. One of mine is the wolf. Place a symbol on your Yule tree to help draw the energy of your personal animal totem.

Joulupukki and JulTomte, Who are they?

Because of my Finnish ancestry, I have become interested the the Finnish version of Santa, Joulupukki. The Joulupukki translated means “Yule Goat” The traditions have evolved over the years, as the Yule Goat used to be a ugly creature that scared children and demanded gifts. Today he resembles the American Santa Claus although he lives in Lapland and his reindeer don’t fly.

A tomte (or tontuu in Finnish) is a Scandinavian mythical creature, much like a brownie. He is said to be a small elderly man with a full beard and dressed as a farmer. The tomte was originally believed to be the soul of the original owner of the farm. He would take care of the farm and its animals, but could also be easily angered. Thus the custom of putting out a bowl of porridge for the tomte is a form of ancestral worship. – Sources: Juoluupukki and Tomte

More Ideas for Yule Decorations

Day 10 of Yule – Trimming a Pagan Tree – More ideas about trimming a pagan tree on the blog One Witch’s Way

Welcome Yule

“May all things Well and good Come to you and yours at this season of Yule.” – This is the greeting that my husband and I have been using to both greet and say farewell to folks. The word “welcome” comes from Old English wilcuma, meaning literally “well + come” (“May you have fared well in coming here!”).

I hope you have enjoyed looking at some alternative decorations for your Yule tree and learned more about their symbolism. I would also enjoy hearing about any other customs or traditions, or special ornaments you use on your tree. Please feel free to comment.

List of Original Illustrations to the article

******

motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Mad Cows

Two cows are chatting in a field. One says to the other, “Are you worried by this mad cow disease?”
The second cow says, “Why would I worry? It doesn’t affect me – I’m a helicopter!”

Posted in Daily Stuff, Newsletter, Pagan, Wiccan | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Stuff 12-3-17 Bogatir

Hi, folks!

Featured Photo by Ken Gagne. Minus Tide at 6:26 PM of -1.5 feet. House Capuchin Project Day from Noon to 5pm.

The sky has lovely blue patches with white fluffies in them, but also lumpy grey sections with slate-colored sky between. When we were driving here Tempus and I were both joking about “melting” and “sparkles” because the sunlight was so bright! It’s 49F. We’ve had a little under 1/10 of an inch of rain this morning, after 1 1/10 yesterday. There’s no wind. Tempus says it was down to 39F when he left the shop last night. There’s almost no chance of rain in the forecast over the next week, so it sounds like a good time to finish up putting things away for the stormy season and cleaning up your gardens. I know Tempus and I were talking about that this morning.

Yesterday was another sick day for me, but I finally started feeling better after the fever broke (I thought it had, Friday night, but it didn’t…) Still dunno what had hold of me and I feel like a limp, used dish-rag, but I made it to the shop today, at least.

We’re going to try to get some projects worked on today, and I have a ton of mail to catch up on!

Yachats sunset on 11/30/15 by Ken Gagne

113015 Ken Gagne Sunset

Today’s Plant is Cascade penstemon, or coast penstemon, Penstemon serrulatus. A member of the plantain family, this was used by the 1st nations peoples as a medicinal remedy for toothache. It’s common name, “Beardtongue” is because the flower appears to be sticking out it’s hairy tongue! It has a lovely flower, and is a semi-deciduous shrub, which usually is very short, unlike many shrubs. Penstemon_serrulatus1The tender shoots that the flowers grow on often get frost-nipped so only survive for a year or so, with the rest of the plant surviving below the level of surrounding plants, acting as a perennial ground-cover. – Feminine, Venus, Earth – Use for headaches, particularly headaches coming from tooth pain or infection by binding the herb with red wool and/or putting it into a red cloth pouch and bind to the head, or even put into your pillowcase at bedtime. You can put a leaf in your shoes to help with the effects of standing on them too long. Roots protect from snakebite and a bunch of the flowers will chase negativity away, particularly that coming from outside. Iow, it won’t do much for a bad mood…. More on Penstemon here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penstemon

Bona Dea Feast Tellus_-_Ara_PacisToday’s feast is to Bona Dea, the Good Goddess! This was an exclusively women’s religious festival. Men could be punished with blindness for profaning the rites. Bona Dea’s true name and face, due to her modesty, were unknown to men. She was the goddess of virtuous womanhood, venerated by everyone from emperors to slaves, but mostly by women, children and plebs. More here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bona_Dea

magick motif slav Kolovrat RodnoverDay of Remembrance for Bogatir Svatogor – Studen (December) 3 – The date refers back to the time of the Great Barrow Gulbishe and the first fight with Pechenegs. Awesome were the honors at the funeral for this great noble warrior. His implements and armor were gigantic, twice as large as the ordinary in size. Today, say a toast to this great warrior. (Bogatir: “Greatest Hero” in Old Russian )

The shop is open 11-7pm Thursday through Monday, although we’re there a lot later most nights. Holiday Hours. We will be closing early on 12/24 and 12/31 and closed 12/25 and 1/1. Need something off hours? Give us a call at 541-563-7154 or Facebook or email at ancientlight@peak.org If we’re supposed to be closed, but it looks like we’re there, try the door. If it’s open, the shop’s open! In case of bad weather, check here at the blog for updates, on our Facebook as Ancient Light, or call the shop.

Love & Light,
Anja

******

Today’s Astro & Calendar

Waxing Moon Magick – The waxing moon is for constructive magick, such as love, wealth, success, courage, friendship, luck or healthy, protection, divination. Any working that needs extra power, such as help finding a new job or healings for serious conditions, can be done now. Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 12/2 at 7:47am. Full Moon – The day of the day before and day after the true Full Moon. “And better it be when the moon is full!”! Prime time for rituals for prophecy, for spells to come to fruition, infusing health and wholeness, etc. A good time for invoking deity. FRUITION Manifesting goals, nurturing, passion, healing, strength, power. Workings on this day are for protection, divination. “extra power”, job hunting, healing serious conditions Also, love, knowledge, legal undertakings, money and dreams. God/dess Aspect: Mother/Abundance/Kingship – – Associated God/desses: Danu, Cerridwen, Gaia, Aphrodite, Isis, Jupiter, Amon-Ra. Phase ends on 12/3 at 7:47pm. Waning Moon Magick – From the Full Moon to the New is a time for study, meditation, and magic designed to banish harmful energies and habits, for ridding oneself of addictions, illness or negativity. Remember: what goes up must come down. Phase ends at the Tide Change on 12/17 at 10:30pm. 

On Friday December 1st, Mercury and Saturn are 3° apart very low after sunset. Their visibility in bright twilight is exaggerated here. (The blue 10deg scale is about the width of your fist held at arm’s length.)
Full Moon (exactly full at 10:47 a.m. EST). This is a “supermoon”; the Moon is near perigee. In fact this is the closest full Moon of 2017. But the difference from average is slight. Can you really detect that this full Moon is a little larger than usual? With enough careful practice moonwatching, yes you can.
The Moon is in Taurus, with orange Aldebaran now to its upper right in the evening. The Pleiades are above Aldebaran. Orange Betelgeuse rises below the Moon not long after dark.
Now that the Pleiades and Aldebaran are up due east, can Orion be far behind? Orion’s entire iconic figure, formed by its brightest seven stars, takes about an hour and a quarter to cross the horizon below Aldebaran. By 10 p.m. Orion is well up in fine pre-winter view.
Mercury and Saturn are disappearing deep down in the afterglow of sunset.

Goddess Month of Astrea runs from 11/28 – 12/25
Celtic tree month of Ruis/Elder Nov 25 – Dec 22 
Runic half-month of Isa/ Is November 28-12 Literally, ‘ice’: a static period. The time of waiting before birth. Nigel Pennick, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont, USA, 1992, 1992

Sun in Sagittarius
Full Moon at 7:47am
Moon in Gemini
Mercury Retrograde 11:34pm last night…. (12/22)
Chiron (12/5), Pallas (12/17), Uranus (1/2/18)  Retrograde
Color – Amber

Harvest 12/3-4

******

©2017 M. Bartlett, Some parts separately copyright

******

Celtic tree month of Ruis/Elder Nov 25 – Dec 22 – Ruis – (RWEESH), elder – Celtic tree month of Ruis (Elder) commences (Nov 25 – Dec 22) – Like other Iron Age Europeans, the Celts were a polytheistic people prior to their conversion to (Celtic) Christianity. The Celts divided the year into 13 lunar cycles (months or moons). These were linked to specific sacred trees which gave each moon its name. Today commences the Celtic tree month of Elder.
Elder or Elderberry (Sambucus) is a genus of fast-growing shrubs or small trees in the family Caprifoliaceae. They bear bunches of small white or cream coloured flowers in the Spring, that are followed by bunches of small red, bluish or black berries. The berries are a very valuable food resource for many birds.
Common North American species include American Elder, Sambucus canadensis, in the east, and Blueberry Elder, Sambucus glauca, in the west; both have blue-black berries.
The common European species is the Common or Black Elder, Sambucus nigra, with black berries. The common elder (Sambucus nigra L.) is a shrub growing to 10 m (33 feet) in damp clearings, along the edge of woods, and especially near habitations. Elders are grown for their blackish berries, which are used for preserves and wine. The leaf scars have the shape of a crescent moon. Elder branches have a broad spongy pith in their centers, much like the marrow of long bones, and an elder branch stripped of its bark is very bone-like. The red elder (S. racemosa L.) is a similar plant at higher elevations; it grows to 5 m (15 feet). Red elder extends its native range to northern North America, and it is cultivated along with other native species, but common elders are seldom seen in cultivation. Elders are in the Honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae).

Ruis – Elder Ogam letter correspondences
Month: Makeup days of the thirteenth Moon
Color: Red
Class: Shrub
Letter: R
Meaning: End of a cycle or problem.

to study this month Straif – Blackthorn Ogam letter correspondences
Month: None
Color: Purple
Class: Chieftain
Letter: SS, Z, ST
Meaning: Resentment; Confusion; Refusing to see the truth

******

Waves tide

Tides for Alsea Bay

*
Day        High      Tide  Height   Sunrise    Moon  Time      % Moon
~            /Low      Time    Feet     Sunset                                    Visible
Su   3     High  12:00 AM     7.3   7:35 AM     Set  7:18 AM      98
~     3      Low   5:29 AM     2.3   4:37 PM    Rise  5:16 PM
~     3     High  11:26 AM     9.6
~     3      Low   6:26 PM    -1.5

******

Affirmation/Thought for the Day – Take the time to notice the little things.

******

Newsletter Journal PromptJournal Prompt – What do you think? – Why do you think the rules you must follow are good or bad?

******

Quotes  

~  If I mayn’t tell you what I feel, what is the use of a friend? – William Makepeace Thackeray
~  Habits and routines in your life may leave you vulnerable. – Kerr Cuhulain
~  If you judge people, you have no time to love them. – Mother Teresa
~  If you treat every situation as a life and death matter, you’ll die a lot of times. – Dean Smith

Listen . . .
With faint dry sound,
Like steps of passing ghosts,
The leaves, frost-crisp’d, break from the trees
And fall. – Adellaide Crapsey (1878–1914)

******

Yule Magick – Crafts

Wheel of the Year Candle – You will need candlewax from each Sabbat candle you use througout the year, a candle mold, and a new wick. This takes a whole year to make. You have to save some of the wax from the candles you used on each Sabbat and keep them in a special place for the whole year. As each Sabbat passes, add the next piece of wax. Since you used them for the Sabbat rituals, they have more power. Once the wheel of the year has made a complete cycle, melt the wax from the eight Sabbats together. Pour the melted wax into a candle mold, or cut a plastic cup in half; add a wick to the bottom of the cup and pour in the wax. Place it in the freezer to harden quickly. Keep it in your sacred space to bring a wonderful coming year. You could also do this with wax from the 13 Full Moons in a year.

Ten Magical Gifts to Share for Yule – about.com By Patti Wigington, About.com Guide http://paganwiccan.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=paganwiccan&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dreamcatcher.net%2Fmoonwise%2Fcrafts.html 

See More About:

Want to give your friends and family a magical gift? Why not make something for them that shows you really care? Here are some of the simplest magical items to make — you can put these together ahead of the Yule season, and give them out to those you care about.

Tarot BoxIf you’ve got a set of Tarot cards that you’d like to keep safe, one of the best ways you can store them is in a special box. This easy craft project is one you can make either for yourself, or as a gift for a friend. If you like, make a bunch of them, choosing a personalized card for each of your coven-mates. Perhaps your HPS would enjoy a box with the High Priestess on it, or someone new to the path might relate to the symbolism of the Fool. Be creative – you can even fill the box with a new Tarot deck, or stock it with crystals, herbs, and other magical items.

IncenseFor thousands of years, people have used fragrant flowers, plants, and herbs as incense. Using smoke to send prayers out to the gods is one of the oldest known forms of ceremony. From the censers of the Catholic church to the Pagan bonfire rituals, incense is a powerful way to let your intent be known. You can make your own quite easily, using a blend of herbs, flowers, wood bark, resins, and berries. Most of these are items you can grow yourself, find in the woods, or purchase inexpensively. Make a selection of different scents and blends, bottle or bag them up, and give them to friends in a decorative basket, along with an incense burner or some charcoal discs.

Magical OilsOur ancestors used oils in ceremony and ritual hundreds and even thousands of years ago. Because many essential oils are still available, we can continue making our own blends today. In the past, oils were created by placing oil or fat over a heat source, and then adding fragrant herbs and flowers to the oil. Many companies today offer synthetic oils at a fraction of the cost of essential oils (essential oils are the ones actually extracted from a plant). However, for magical purposes it’s best to use authentic, essential oils — these contain the magical properties of the plant, which synthetic oils do not have. Put together a few vials of different oils, such as Blessing Oil or Money Oil, and include them in a spell basket for a friend.

Herb CollectionHerbs have been used for thousands of years, both medicinally and ritually. Every herb has its own unique characteristics, and these properties are what makes the plant special. Subsequently, many Wiccans and Pagans use herbs as part of their regular ritual practice. Why not put some together for a friend? You can pot fresh ones in a planter, or dry a selection and put them in pretty bags and bottles. To figure out which herbs you want to use, for which purpose, be sure to read about Magical Herb Use.

Portable Altar KitGot a friend or coven-mate who travels a lot? Put together a portable altar kit. You can include anything you like in it — find a nice box or bag, and fill it with magical goodies. It’s easy to do, and it makes it a snap to just grab-and-go on your way out the door!

CandlesCandle magic is one of the simplest forms of spell casting. Considered sympathetic magic, it’s a method which doesn’t require a lot of fancy ritual or expensive ceremonial artifacts. In other words, anyone with a candle can cast a spell. So why not make some candles to give as gifts? It’s not hard to do, if you’ve got a little bit of free time. You can make spell-specific candles, such as a Prosperity Candle, or you can create a candle for a Moon Ritual. If you’re not sure which one you like, why not try just some simple poured candles with different scents and colors?

Besoms and BroomsThe besom is the traditional witch’s broom. It’s associated with all kinds of legend and folklore, including the popular notion that witches fly around in the night on a broomstick. The besom is a great addition to your collection of magical tools — it’s used in many traditions as a method of cleansing or purifying a space. Why not make one to give to someone who means a lot to you?

Altar ClothsMany Pagans and Wiccans choose to use an altar cloth. It tends to serve multiple purposes — first of all, it protects your work surface from scratches and wax dropples during ritual. It also is a great way to decorate seasonally — perhaps a green cloth for the spring, or a brown one in the fall. You can make a simple altar cloth by cutting a three- to five-foot square of material and hemming all four sides. Or, if you’re feeling really adventurous, create our Elemental Altar Cloth so the people on your gift list can celebrate the four natural elements!

Yule OrnamentsOrnaments make a great gift for your Pagan or Wiccan friends, because there are so few commercially-made ornaments with a Pagan flair. Mix up a batch of Salt Dough, use your cookie cutters, and create your own ornaments that your friends can bake and hang. For a quick and kid-friendly idea, make a bundle of Pipecleaner Pentacles to share, or go out in the woods and gather up some of earth’s goodies to make Pinecone Ornaments. Put them all in a pretty tin, tie a ribbon around the top, and share with the people on your gift list.

Coven BannerIf you’d like to give a gift to your entire group instead of (or in addition to) individual people, why not make a coven banner? If your group or coven attends public events, it’s not a bad idea to have your own banner. You can hang this up so people know who you are, and it also helps to make you look a bit more organized — groups with a logo or banner appear more “official” to some folks. Anyway, making your own banner is a great magical project — think of the energy you can put into a creation like this! If you’re not part of an established tradition, don’t worry – you can still make one of these — select a logo for yourself, or for the deities you honor, or for your family’s heritage.

More Magical Gifts to MakeLooking for more magical gifts to make and share? Check out our additional list which includes baked goods, hand-sewn projects, clay creations, and more! More Magical Yule Gifts

******

motif Silliness SmilieSilliness – Hello Krampus

Posted in Daily Stuff, Newsletter, Pagan, Wiccan | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Stuff 12-3-17 update

Hi, folks!

There should actually be a real newsletter today, once I’m at the shop. My fever is finally gone, although I’m still kinda wobbly. I have to get things re-set for the newsletters, and then today’s will be first up. Kinda excited! I’ve missed being at the shop.

Love and Light,
Anja

Posted in Newsletter | Leave a comment

Daily Stuff 12-2-17

Hi, folks!

Best-laid plans and all that…. well, I’m still home, although I’m actually starting to feel human. Only starting…. Tempus is at the shop again today. No workshops. <sigh> I’m not quite well enough to feel stir crazy, but I feel as though I ought to be. So, that’s progress.

He’s says that’s it’s been fairly quiet so far, while I’ve been out.

I’m completely out of templates and such, so I’m just going to leave some pix in here and hope you’ll forgive me for not having more.

Love & Light
Anja

Posted in Daily Stuff | Leave a comment

Daily Stuff 12-1-17 update

Hi, folks!

It’s been awhile since I’ve been this kind of ill, but I’m hoping to be able to be at the shop for at least part of tomorrow. Tempus will have the shop open, in any case. Thanks for your good wishes. I am getting better. I don’t think we’re going to have workshops tomorrow. Safer if I hide by my computer…..

Love and Light,
Anja

A lovely photo by Ken Gagne of Yachats ornaments and lights and tree tonight.

Posted in Daily Stuff, Update | Leave a comment